Fieldnotes: Digital Resources

A permanent list of digital resources in archaeology and related fields.

See also: Directory of Graduate Programs in the United States and Canada

The Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies - The Roman Society - was founded in 1910 as the sister society to the Society for the Promotion of Hellenic Studies. The Roman Society is the leading organisation in the United Kingdom for those interested in the study of Rome and the Roman Empire. Its scope is wide, covering Roman history, archaeology, literature and art down to about A.D. 700. It has a broadly based membership, drawn from over forty countries and from all ages and walks of life.
The department of History Archaeology and Social Anthropology (IAKA) of the University of Thessaly excavations of the Archaic-Classical period sanctuary at Soros within the the municipality of Iolkos.
The Archaeology Center at Stanford provides a forum for interaction amongst faculty and students in different parts of the University. It promotes theoretical, methodological and ethical innovation and encourages visiting scholars, post-doctoral researchers, faculty and students to work side-by-side on a daily basis. There is a strong global range of interests, with student and faculty researchers working from Southeast Asia to Europe, Africa and the Americas.
The American Schools of Oriental Research supports and encourages the study of the peoples and cultures of the Near East, from the earliest times to the present. Founded in 1900, ASOR is a not-for-profit 501(c)3 organization. It is apolitical and has no religious affiliation.
The Curriculum in Archaeology brings together archaeology faculty located in five units of the College of Arts and Sciences. These units are the Departments of Anthropology, Art, Classics, Religious Studies, the Research Laboratories of Archaeology. The Curriculum offers an undergraduate major and a minor in archaeology. It also offers courses and research opportunities for students in many parts of the world, particularly in the Americas, Europe, and the Middle East. Laboratories, computer facilities, and extensive research collections are maintained by the Research Laboratories of Archaeology. Additional archaeological collections are housed in the Department of Classics and Ackland Art Museum.
The Digital Archaeological Record (tDAR) is an international digital archive and repository that houses data about archaeological investigations, research, resources, and scholarship. tDAR provides researchers new avenues to discover and integrate information relevant to topics they are studying. Users can search tDAR for digital documents, data sets, images, GIS files, and other data resources from archaeological projects spanning the globe. For data sets, users also can use data integration tools in tDAR to simplify and illuminate comparative research. ACCESS is a core feature of tDAR. tDAR supports broadening the access to a wide variety of archaeological data. Browsing or searching the tDAR repository enables users to identify digital documents, data sets, images, and other kinds of archaeological data for research, learning, and teaching. tDAR enables users to download data files while maintaining the confidentiality of legally protected information and the privacy of digital resources on which a researcher is still working. PRESERVATION is the other key part of tDAR’s mission. tDAR and its parent organization, Digital Antiquity, are dedicated to ensuring the long-term preservation of digital archaeological data. These data document the archaeological record, the efforts of the archaeological and scientific community, and the material and social characteristics of the cultures studied. GROWTH and IMPROVEMENT are part of Digital Antiquity’s strategy for tDAR. Regular enhancements and improvements that incorporate advances in research methods, digital preservation, and technology are planned in cooperation with an advisory team that includes archaeologists, supporting agencies, preservation experts, and Digital Antiquity staff.
The Gabii Project was launched in 2007 with the objective of studying and excavating the ancient Latin city of Gabii, a city-state that was both a neighbor of, and a rival to, Rome in the first millennium BC.
The Gabii Project is an international archaeological initiative under the direction of Nicola Terrenato of the University of Michigan. The field research of the Gabii Project began with a geophysical survey of ca. 40 hectares of Gabii's urban center in 2007 and 2008.  After the 2007 season, initial findings encouraged a full-scale magnetometry survey of the urban area and this was completed by autumn 2008.  The initial findings presented evidence of a previously unknown urban grid within the line of Gabii's ancient walls, and it was on this basis that major excavations commenced in June 2009.  A second campaign of fieldwork was carried out during the summer of 2010. The initial phase of excavations will continue through 2013.