Meet Our Lecturers

After receiving his Ph.D. from Princeton University, Nassos Papalexandrou taught at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor for two years. Since 2001 he has been teaching Greek and Near Eastern Art and Archaeology at the University of Texas at Austin. His research interests focus on Early Greece and its cultural interconnections with its eastern and western neighbors. He has excavated on Crete, Naxos, and Cyprus and he is currently finishing a book on monsters and vision in the Archaic Mediterranean.  Another project deals with the agency of antiquities as diplomatic gifts in the Post WWII period.  Along with Amy Papalexandrou (Stockton College), Dr. Papalexandrou will be holding an ASCSA Gertrude Smith professorship in the Summer of 2014.

S. Thomas Parker is Professor with the Department of History, North Carolina State University.  He received degrees from Trinity University (TX) and UCLA (M.A. and Ph.D.), and his areas of specialization are the history and  archaeology of the Roman Empire, the Roman army and frontiers, Roman Arabia, pottery, and economy.  He has conducted fieldwork in Jordan, Israel and Cyprus, and since 1994 has been Director of the Roman Aqaba Project, Jordan.  He has received numerous grants and fellowships for his work, and, among other publications, is a contributor to the Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World (ed. R.J.A. Talbert, Princeton University, 2000).

Dr. William A. Parkinson (Curator of Eurasian Anthropology, The Field Museum; Adjunct Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of Illinois at Chicago) is a specialist in European and Eastern Mediterranean Prehistory.  His anthropological research explores the social dynamics of early village societies and the emergence of early states. He is American co-director of the Körös Regional Archaeological Project in Hungary and The Diros Project on the Mani Peninsula in southern Greece. 

Tim Pauketat is an archaeologist and professor of Anthropology and Medieval Studies at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign. He previously taught at the State University of New York in Buffalo and the University of Oklahoma. Professor Pauketat is interested in the study of ancient religion and urbanism, and has been excavating the pre-Columbian colonies and pilgrimage sites of the Cahokian civilization around St. Louis north into Wisconsin. The author or editor of a dozen scholarly books, Tim also writes for nonprofessional audiences, recently including a book entitled Cahokia: Ancient America's Great City on the Mississippi (Penguin, 2010).

J. Theodore Peña is with the University of California, Berkeley, and holds his degrees from the University of Michigan (Ph.D.) and Wesleyan University.  His research interests include the archaeology of Roman and pre-Roman Italy, ancient economy and economic archaeology, and ceramic studies.  Forthcoming publications include the Cambridge Handbook of Roman Pottery in the Mediterranean Basin (Cambridge University Press).

Featured Lecturer

Professor Stephen Harvey attended Yale University for his undergraduate degree and the University of Philadelphia for his PhD in Egyptian Archaeology. He currently works in the Department of... Read More

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