Meet Our Lecturers

Elspeth Dusinberre (A.B. summa cum laude Harvard 1991, Ph.D. Michigan 1997) is interested in cultural interactions in Anatolia, particularly in the ways in which the Achaemenid Empire affected local social structures and in the give-and-take between Achaemenid and other cultures. Her first book, Aspects of Empire in Achaemenid Sardis (Cambridge 2003), examines such issues from the vantage of the Lydian capital, while her third book, Empire, Authority, and Autonomy in Achaemenid Anatolia (Cambridge 2013) considers all of Anatolia and proposes a wholly new model for understanding imperialism in general. Her second book is a diachronic excavation monograph, Gordion Seals and Sealings: Individuals and Society (Philadelphia 2005). She is currently studying the seal impressions on the Aramaic tablets of the Persepolis Fortification Archive (dating ca. 500 BCE), and the cremation burials from Gordion. She has worked at Sardis, Gordion, and Kerkenes Dağ in Turkey, as well as at sites elsewhere in the eastern Mediterranean.

Professor Dusinberre teaches primarily Greek and Near Eastern archaeology, with a little Egyptian and Roman archaeology plus Greek and Latin language thrown in. She has been awarded six University of Colorado teaching awards, the system-wide President's Teaching Scholar Award, the Chancellor's Faculty Recognition Award, and the Faculty Graduate Advisor Award.

Steven Ellis is with the Department of Classics at the University of Cincinnati, and holds his Ph.D. from the University of Sydney.  His areas of specialization include Roman urbanism and social history, ancient architecture, Greek and Roman art and archaeology, and the excavation of complex urban sites; his is the project director for the Pompeii Archaeological Research Project at Porta Stabia, and the East Isthmia Archaeological Project.  Professor Ellis has published widely, and has several recent forthcoming works on aspects of his work in Pompeii.

Professor Garrett G. Fagan has taught at Pennsylvania State University since 1996. He was born in Dublin, Ireland, and educated at Trinity College Dublin. He received his Ph.D. from McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, and has an extensive research record in Roman history, Latin epigraphy, and method in archaeology, and has held a prestigious Killam Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and an Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellowship at the University of Cologne. He has published numerous articles in international journals, and his first monograph, Bathing in Public in the Roman World, was published by the University of Michigan Press in 1999. He has also edited a volume on the phenomenon of pseudoarchaeology (2006), and has a number of forthcoming works on Roman baths and water use, and the Roman arena.

William Fitzhugh is with the Department of Anthropology at the Smithsonian Institution, and holds his degrees from Harvard (Ph.D. and M.A.) and Dartmouth (B.A.).  Dr. Fitzhugh’s areas of specialization are arctic archaeology, circumpolar cultures, Mongolia, and Vikings (especially in the Western Atlantic).  He has done fieldwork in the North Atlantic regions and arctic Russia, and in Mongolia, and has been recognized for his work in exhibits, documentaries, and research.

Dr. Scott M. Fitzpatrick (Ph.D. Anthropology, 2003, University of Oregon) is an archaeologist who specializes in the archaeology of island and coastal regions, particularly in the Pacific and Caribbean. Much of his research focuses on colonization events, seafaring strategies, adaptive strategies on smaller islands, exchange systems, chronometric techniques, and human impacts on ancient environments. He has active field projects in Palau (western Micronesia) and several islands in the Caribbean, including the Grenadines and Nevis. Dr. Fitzpatrick is the founder and Co-Editor of the Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology (Routledge/Taylor & Francis), Associate Editor for Archaeology in Oceania, and serves on the editorial boards of three other journals. Recent publications have appeared in the Caribbean Journal of Science, Geoarchaeology, Journal of Archaeological Science, Journal of Biogeography, Latin American Antiquity, Human Ecology, and Radiocarbon. He also has edited several special issues of journals and volumes, including Voyages of Discovery: the Archaeology of Islands (Praeger, 2004) and Island Shores, Distant Pasts: Archaeological and Biological Perspectives on the Pre-Columbian Settlement of the Caribbean (University Press of Florida, 2010). His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of the Interior, and the Sasakawa Peace Foundation (Japan), among others.

Featured Lecturer

Professor Andrea M. Berlin is the James R. Wiseman Chair in Classical Archaeology at Boston University. She received an MA in Syro-Palestinian Archaeology from the University of Chicago’s... Read More

Upcoming Events

List an Event

Dig Deeper

Email the AIA
Subscribe to the AIA e-Update

Sign Up!