Meet Our Lecturers

Annette Giesecke is Professor of Classics, Chair of Ancient Greek and Roman Studies, and Center for Material Culture Studies faculty at the University of Delaware. Her research interests include the history and meaning of gardens in ancient Greece and Rome, urbanism and ethics of land use in classical antiquity, as well as expressions of the utopian impulse in classical art, literature, and architecture. Her publications include The Mythology of Plants (Getty Publications, forthcoming 2014); EARTH PERFECT? Nature, Utopia, and the Garden (contrib. and ed.; Black Dog Publishing, London; 2012), and The Epic City: Urbanism, Utopia, and the Garden in Ancient Greece and Rome (Harvard University Press, 2007). She holds degrees from Harvard (Ph.D. and M.A.) and UCLA (B.A.).

Andrew Goldman is Associate Professor of History with Gonzaga University.  He received his degrees from Wesleyan University and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (M.A. and Ph.D. in Classical Archaeology), and his research interests include Roman Anatolia, the Roman military, and Roman pottery.  Professor Goldman has worked at many sites throughout Turkey, including Çatal Höyük, and since 1992 he has been working at the ancient site of Gordion.  The finds at Gordion are some of the earliest Roman military equipment excavated in the Roman East, and the site is the only Roman military base of its period to ever have been explored in Turkey.

Hilary Gopnik is with Ancient Mediterranean Studies at Emory University, and holds her degrees from the University of Toronto (Ph.D. and M.A.) and McGill University (B.A.).  Her fields of research are Near Eastern and Greek archaeology, particularly Iran and the Caucasus, and the Medes and Persians.

Susanne Grieve is Director of Conservation at East Carolina University, Lead Conservator for the Antarctic Heritage Trust, and has been a senior conservator with Global Artifact Preservation Services and the Mariners’ Museum.  She holds her degrees from University College, London, Flinders University, and the University of West Florida.  Her fields of specialization include conservation of 20th century materials, preservation in extreme environments, and organic residue analysis.

John R. Hale is the Director of Liberal Studies for the College of Arts and Sciences, and Adjunct Professor of Archaeology, at the University of Louisville, Kentucky.  He earned his B.A. at Yale University and his Ph.D. at Cambridge University. Professor Hale teaches introductory courses on archaeology, as well as more specialized courses on the Bronze Age, the ancient Greeks, the Roman world, Celtic cultures, Vikings, and on nautical and underwater archaeology.  He has received many awards for distinguished teaching, including the Panhellenic Teacher of the Year Award and the Delphi Center Award.  He has been published in the journal Antiquity, The Classical Bulletin, The Journal of Roman Archaeology, and Scientific American, and is also the author of Lords of the Sea (2009), a volume about the ancient Athenian navy.  Professor Hale has more than 30 years of fieldwork experience, including at the Romano-British site of Dragonby in Lincolnshire, and at the Roman Villa of Torre de Palma, Portugal. He has also carried out interdisciplinary studies of ancient oracle sites in Greece and Turkey, including the famous Delphic Oracle, and participated in an undersea search in Greek waters for lost fleets from the time of the Persian Wars.  He was an AIA  Norton Lecturer for 2009/2010.

Featured Lecturer

Sarah Milledge Nelson is the John Evans Distinguished Professor with the University of Denver’s Department of Anthropology.  She received her degrees from Wellesley College, and the... Read More

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