Abstract: Mayapan, the last Maya capital in Mexico

Lecturer: Susan Milbrath

This lecture focuses on Mayapan, the Postclassic capital of the Maya world. This city dominated the Maya area between AD 1100-1450, serving as a source of cultural influence over a wide area of the Maya world and also a center for widespread trade. Evidence for this cultural dominance is best seen in the spread of certain forms of architecture and ceramics, especially effigy censers representing deities important to the Postclassic Maya. The revival of earlier architectural forms is one of the hallmarks of Mayapan around AD 1300, a time that different political factions reasserted the cultural heritage in Yucatan. During the last century of the site’s occupation there is evidence of a transformation at the site with inspiration coming from distant sites in Central Mexico and the East Coast of Yucatan. This foreign influence eventually contributed to the demise of the city more than 100 years before the Spanish conquest.

 

Related Bibliography published by Susan Milbrath:

The Legacy of the Classic and Terminal Classic Periods at Postclassic Mayapán. Latin American Antiquity 20(4):581-606, 2009. (first author with Carlos Peraza Lope).

Clash of Worldviews in Late Mayapan.  In Maya Worldviews at Conquest, Leslie Cecil and Timothy W. Pugh (editors), University Press of Colorado, Boulder, 183-204, 2009. (first author with Carlos Peraza Lope).

Effigy Censers of the Chen Mul Modeled Ceramic System and their Implications for Late Postclassic Maya Interregional Interaction. Mexicon XXX(5):93-96, 2008 (first author with Jim Aimers, Carlos Peraza Lope, Lynda Florey Folan).

Mayapan’s Effigy Censers: Iconography, Context, and External Connections. Final Report to the Foundation for Mesoamerican Studies, 2007. http://www.famsi.org/reports/05025/index.html.

Revisiting Mayapan: Revisiting Mayapan: Mexico's Last Maya Capital. Ancient Mesoamerica, vol. 14(2): 1-47, 2003. (first author, with Carlos Peraza Lope).

The Last Great Capital of the Maya. Archaeology 58(2): 27-30, 2005.

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Dr. Bridget Buxton is Assistant Professor in the Department of History, University of Rhode Island. She holds her degrees from Victoria University of Wellington (M.A.) and University of California,... Read More

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