AIA Supports Designation of Five New National Monuments
April 5, 2013

San Juan Islands National Monument (Photo: Bureau of Land Management)
San Juan Islands National Monument (Photo: Bureau of Land Management)
Petroglyphs at the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument (Photo: Bureau of Land Management)New Castle Court House Assembly Room, part of the First State National Monument (Photo: Delaware Department of State - Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs)Youngsholm, part of the Charles Young Buffalo Soldiers National Monument (Photo: National Park Service and National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center)Stewart's Canal, part of the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Monument (Photo: National Park Service)
Petroglyphs at the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument (Photo: Bureau of Land Management) New Castle Court House Assembly Room, part of the First State National Monument (Photo: Delaware Department of State - Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs) Youngsholm, part of the Charles Young Buffalo Soldiers National Monument (Photo: National Park Service and National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center) Stewart's Canal, part of the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Monument (Photo: National Park Service)
Select a thumbnail to view more in the gallery.

On March 25, 2013, President Obama designated five new national monuments in the United States: the Rio Grande del Norte in northern New Mexico; the San Juan Islands off the coast of Washington State; the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad site in Maryland; the Charles Young Buffalo Soldiers home in Ohio; and the First State monument in Delaware. This official designation will ensure the protection of these historic places, allowing them to educate and excite for generations to come.

AIA President Elizabeth Bartman recently joined dozens of national organizations dedicated to the preservation of American history, including the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the Society for Historical Archaeology, and the National Parks Conservation Association, in expressing deepest appreciation to the President for his recent designation of the five new national monuments.  

Throughout its history, the Archaeological Institute of America has been a strong advocate for the preservation of the world’s cultural heritage. In fact, the AIA received its congressional charter in 1906 in recognition of its role in the development and passage of the Antiquities Act, the very act which gave President Obama the power to designate the five new monuments in March 2013.

 

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