International Archaeology Day Celebration at Pueblo Grande Museum
November 6, 2013

AIA Volunteers mudslinging on the platform mound
AIA Volunteers mudslinging on the platform mound
Happy Girl Scouts excited to get their Archaeology Badge at International Archaeology DayPueblo Grande Museum Docent Roberto out by the pithouses, led AIA volunteers on tour of the siteAIA volunteers in action slinging the mudHuhugam Ki Museum staff Gary with girl scouts at the Traditional Kitchen along the ruin trail
Happy Girl Scouts excited to get their Archaeology Badge at International Archaeology Day Pueblo Grande Museum Docent Roberto out by the pithouses, led AIA volunteers on tour of the site AIA volunteers in action slinging the mud Huhugam Ki Museum staff Gary with girl scouts at the Traditional Kitchen along the ruin trail
Select a thumbnail to view more in the gallery.

Pueblo Grande Museum in collaboration with the Phoenix Chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America celebrated International Archaeology Day on Saturday, October 19, 2013 with free admission, demonstrations, classes and tours!

Pueblo Grande Museum had over 150 people visit to celebrate IAD 2013. There was free museum admission all day, guided tours of the museum and archaeological site, as well as demonstrations along the trail. The Phoenix Chapter of AIA worked with the volunteer platform mound preservation team, the Mudslingers, to help to repairs and maintenance on the over 800 year old hohokam platform mound on the Pueblo Grande site.

36 children took part in thefree Archaeology for Kids program, where children learned about the science of archaeology and excavation by participating in a simulated dig of a hohokam pithouse. Many of the children were girl scouts visiting that day to complete their Archaeology bagdes.

The Huhugam Ki Museum on the Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian Reservation also sent out staff to do demontrations of traditional native cooking along the archaeological trail at Pueblo Grande. They brought out traditional desert plants to show how the hohokam of 1000 years ago and the native peoples of today still use the plants of the desert for food and medicinal purposes.

 

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