AIA Excavation Outreach Contest 2011

Thank you for voting for your favorite archaeological public outreach program. Congratulations to the Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project! Read more

     
American Indian Arts Celebration
Big Cypress Reservation

Every year in early November, the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum hosts the annual American Indian Arts Celebration (AIAC) on the Museum festival grounds in the Seminole Indian Big Cypress Reservation. This event focuses on the traditional and contemporary arts, dance and music of the Seminole Tribe of Florida as well as other tribes from across the country. The festival has become widely regarded as an indigenous cultural explosion in the Everglades and grows in attendance annually. The Archaeology tent affords visitors keen insight into the role of archaeology and the Tribal Historic Preservation Office. 

Submitted by: Julie Labate, Seminole Tribe of Florida
Audience:
K-12
general public

Estimated number of people reached: 3500

Blue Creek
Belize

The Maya Research Program (MRP) is a U.S.-based non-profit organization (501C-3) that sponsors archaeological and ethnographic research in Middle America. Each summer since 1992, MRP has sponsored archaeological fieldwork at the Maya site of Blue Creek in Belize and has been instrumental in documenting and protecting many Maya sites in the region through public outreach and education. Over 2000 students and volunteers from around the world have participated in the project in the past 19 years. MRP's work at Blue Creek has produced an academic book, dozens of published papers, five doctoral dissertations and more than ten master's theses.

Submitted by: Colleen Hanratty, Maya Research Program
Audience:
K-12
college/university
general public
tourists
educators
archaeological professionals
other
Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site
Charleston, South Carolina

Charles Towne Landing, founded in 1670, is home to the first permanent European settlement in the Carolinas. Many residents of Charleston hold our site dear to their hearts since it preserves the very roots of their city. Visitors love chatting with archaeologists in the field or taking behind-the-scenes tours of our archaeology lab. We try to engage the public further through our biannual archaeology festivals with kid-friendly activities, our quarterly archaeology e-newsletter ArchNews, and an annual archaeology conference. When we faced budget cuts, the community stepped in and kept our project going by volunteering in every capacity possible.

Submitted by: Cicek Beeby, South Carolina Parks, Recreation & Tourism
Audience:
K-12
college/university
general public
tourists
educators
archaeological professionals
other
Fort St. Joseph
Niles, Michigan

You are invited to witness and practice archaeology at the site of Fort St. Joseph, an 18th century French mission, garrison, and trading post discovered by Western Michigan University archaeologists in 1998. Join one of our summer camps in which middle and high school students, teachers, and lifelong learners work alongside members of the archaeological field school, now in its 36th year.  Plan to attend our open house event which features living history re-enactors, informational panels and displays, and ongoing excavations, enjoyed by over 10,000 visitors since 2006. For more information visit our website or see us on Facebook.

Submitted by: Michael S. Nassaney, Western Michigan University
Audience:
K-12
college/university
general public
tourists
educators
archaeological professionals
Poggio Colla
In the Mugello Valley of Tuscany, in Italy

In the Mugello Valley, our Etruscan excavation reaches local communities through public lectures; exhibitions in libraries, supermarkets and museums; an Etruscan cooking workshop; and weekly excavation site tours for senior citizens, school children, and interest groups. Italian high school students excavate with us annually--150 to date. Since 1995, Poggio Colla Field School has maintained an extensive website: smu.edu/poggio. We blog on SMU Adventures; staff lecture internationally. We’ve shared discoveries in symposia; annual reports; a show in conjunction with a major exhibition of Etruscan art at the Meadows Museum; our FaceBook page, YouTube video, and a major documentary: Etruscan Odyssey.

Submitted by: Kathy Windrow, Mugello Valley Archaeological Project and Poggio Colla Field School
Audience:
K-12
college/university
general public
tourists
educators
archaeological professionals
Torre d'en Galmés
Menorca, Spain

Last summer, we made a special effort to create an exhibit that was particularly child-friendly, as the most important bearers of culture are often the children who inherit it. The exhibit features original artifacts found in a house that collapsed in the 13th century, when the Muslim medieval family who lived there was forced out. The exhibit also includes panels, videos, and a reproduction of the medieval kitchen, a perfect setting to talk about food-processing, new products, and family chores. Did you know eggplants, cotton, rice, and coffee arrived in Europe thanks to the Muslim population that lived in Spain?

Submitted by: Amalia Perez-Juez, Boston University
Audience:
K-12
general public
educators

Estimated number of people reached: 4500

 

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