AIA Online Excavation Outreach Contest 2012 Entries

Congratulations to the Maya Research Program! Read more

"The Dry:" an African American homesteading community

University of Denver

Archaeology at “The Dry,” an early 20th century African American homesteading community in southeastern Colorado, investigates the daily lives of settlers, but above all the meaning of archaeological sites for descendants and local communities. A blog, archaeology day games for children and an open-house has brought archaeologists, descendants and community together to discuss the harshness of life at “The Dry” and personal remembrances. For descendants it is important to present a different history of Colorado, one that addresses the Diaspora of African American farmers to the West, while the local community is eager to preserve a meaningful heritage.

Submitted by: M. Dores Cruz

Audience:
K-12
general public
educators

Estimated number of people reached:+300

Bamburgh Castle and Environs

Bamburgh Research Project (BRP)

The BRP is a not-for-profit organisation designed to explore the environs of Bamburgh Castle. It was established in 1996 with the motto ‘bringing the past to life for everyone’.

Over the past 15 years we have been teaching volunteers the skill of practical archaeology through our annual excavations and we have created community projects with local schools and inhabitants. We are also actively reaching out on the internet, via social media, to communicate with those people who cannot physically visit the site for financial, travel or health reasons.

The BRP is firmly committed to making the past accessible to everyone

Submitted by:Joanne Kirton

Audience:
K-12
college/university
general public
tourists
educators
archaeological professionals

Estimated number of people reached:5000+

Blue Creek, Belize

Maya Research Program 

The Maya Research Program is a non-profit organization (501C3) that sponsors archaeological research in Middle America. Each summer since 1992, we have sponsored archaeological fieldwork in Belize. For the past 21 years, MRP has encouraged public participation in our excavation projects and each summer 120 students and volunteers join our excavations to learn more about the ancient Maya and archaeological methodology. MRP is dedicated to educating the public about the importance of archaeological conservation and stewardship thorough active participation in our research projects. For instance, in 2011, our participants raised sufficient funds to purchase the site of Grey Fox and prevent its destruction.

Submitted by:Colleen Hanratty

Audience:
K-12
college/university
general public
tourists
educators
archaeological professionals

Estimated number of people reached:7500-10000

Fornholt Site and Environs

Archaeology Southwest - Mule Creek Underground blog

What happened to Southwestern peoples in the centuries just before the Spaniards arrived? Archaeology Southwest's work at a thirteenth-century site in western New Mexico is part of a larger investigation into this question. We’re exploring migration and interaction within and among multiethnic settlements across the southern Southwest. Written with our students, our Mule Creek Underground blog shares why this work is important and how we know what we know. By going beyond “finds” and giving a perspective from settlements, cultural landscapes, and broader scales that link modern Native American communities to our research, we create meaningful connections to the past.

Submitted by:Kate Sarther Gann

Audience:
college/university
general public
educators
archaeological professionals
other

Estimated number of people reached:15,000

Magdalen College School

Archaeo-schools

Archaeo-schools provided an opportunity for students age 11 to 18 years to explore the medieval site of Magdalen College School, which dates to c.1150. We enjoyed visits from community members in their 80s, who had attended the school in the past!  Students learned many transferable skills like journalism and film making while they explored their heritage through research and excavation. As a result Archaeo-schools now has permission to set up a Heritage Activity centre on the site. Through in-house and outreach activities, all members of the community will have an opportunity to become stakeholders in their local heritage.

Submitted by:Tiffany Brownell

Audience:
K-12
college/university
general public
educators
archaeological professionals

Estimated number of people reached:1000+

Michigan State University Campus Archaeology Program

Michigan State University Campus Archaeology Program

Michigan State University’s Campus Archaeology Program works to mitigate and protect the archaeological resources on MSU’s beautiful and historic campus. The program is unique in that it conducts survey and excavation prior to any form of construction on campus. Throughout the year, research and survey is conducted by all levels of students, under the supervision of Dr. Lynne Goldstein. Campus Archaeology consistently engages the students, staff, faculty and wider community through the summer field schools for students, various talks and presentations on campus and local museums, and particularly through various social media throughout the entire year.

Submitted by:Katy Meyers and Lynne Goldstein

Audience:
K-12
college/university
general public
tourists
educators
archaeological professionals

Estimated number of people reached:15,000+

Quebrada de La Cueva, Departamento de Humahuaca, Jujuy, Argentina

CONICET - Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (Argentina)

Our project studies the prehispanic social processes in La Cueva gorge, Norwestern Argentina, from a multivocal perspective which includes the participation of local aboriginal communities and the archaeological team. This cooperation results from mutual agreements, the organization of archaeological workshops for adult community members and the elaboration of didactic units of archaeological content and visits to one of the archaeological sites for the students from the three local rural schools, as well as the publication of a book about the archaeology of the gorge and the importance of heritage stewardship for local teachers and students.

Submitted by:Paola Silvia Ramundo

Audience:
general public
educators
archaeological professionals

Estimated number of people reached:150

Santa Maria Zapotitlan

University of Calgary/ Zapotitlan Communitary Museum

The ‘Chontalpa Historical Archaeology Project’ (CHAP) collaborates closely with the highland Chontal people of Zapotitlan, an economically and socially marginalized community in southern Mexico. Our excavations have opened a deep window into the last 1500 years of this community’s past, and gave the local schoolchildren a firsthand opportunity to engage and learn about archaeology, archaeologists, and most importantly about themselves. This collaborative effort has materialized in the first ‘Communitary Museum and Educational Center’ for the region, where the local committee members currently document their own tangible and intangible heritage and further co-present it in professional conferences together with CHAP members.

Submitted by:The Chontalpa Historical Archaeology Project

Audience:
K-12
general public
tourists
educators
archaeological professionals

Estimated number of people reached:1500

 

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