The Parilia: Celebrating Rome's Birthday

Sponsored by Central Carolinas Society of the AIA and Davidson College

AIA Society Event: Central Carolinas (Charlotte)

Saturday, April 21, 2012 - 3:00pm - 5:00pm

Location:
Erwin Lodge
1345 Grey Road
Davidson, NC 28036
United States

On April 21 the Central Carolinas Society of the Archaeological Institute of America and the Department of Classics at Davidson College will celebrate the ancient Roman festival of Parilia in Davidson NC! This annual festival honored both the 'birthday' of the city Rome and Pales, an agricultural goddess.

Thanks to a grant from the Archaeological Institute of America, there will be an epic celebration of the Parilia.  This celebration will include Roman rituals, fresco painting according to the ancient Roman methods, and good food.

Please follow this link to reserve your spot at the Parilia! Reserving your spot allows us to make sure that we have the right amount of food and painting materials for all.

Website: https://sites.google.com/site/hilarybecker/home/parilia_2012

Contact:
Hilary Becker
hibecker@davidson.edu

Building Pharaoh’s Ships

AIA Society Event: Central Carolinas (Charlotte)

Wednesday, February 15, 2012 - 7:30pm - 9:00pm

Location:
Davidson College Visual Arts Center, room 117
Main Street
Davidson, NC 28036
United States

A lecture by Dr. Cheryl Ward of Coastal Carolina University. A reception will follow the lecture.

Website: https://www.facebook.com/AIA.Central.Carolinas

Contact:
Hilary Becker
hibecker@davidson.edu
704-894-2318

Exploring Joara: Native American Chiefs and Spanish Armies in the 16th century North Carolina Piedmont

AIA Society Event: Central Carolinas (Charlotte)

Tuesday, March 13, 2012 - 7:30pm - 9:00pm

Location:
Davidson College Visual Arts Center, room 117
Main Street
Davidson, NC 28036
United States

A lecture by Dr. David Moore (Warren Wilson College) “Exploring Joara: Native American Chiefs and Spanish Armies in the 16th century North Carolina Piedmont”. The lecture will be followed by a reception.

Website: https://www.facebook.com/AIA.Central.Carolinas

Contact:
Hilary Becker
hibecker@davidson.edu
704-894-2318

Roman Rainbow: a Chemical and Archaeological Investigation of an Ancient Pigment Shop

AIA Society Event: Central Carolinas (Charlotte)

Tuesday, November 15, 2011 - 7:30pm - 9:00pm

Location:
Davidson College Belk Visual Arts Center
315 N. Main St
Davidson, NC 28036
United States

Hilary Becker and Ruth Beeston, both of Davidson College, will present a lecture entitled  “Roman Rainbow: a Chemical and Archaeological Investigation of an Ancient Pigment Shop” in which they will discuss ongoing archaeological and chemical research on pigments recovered from the Area Sacra di Sant'Omobono in Rome, Italy. Becker is visiting assistant professor of Classics at Davidson and Beeston is professor of Chemistry. The lecture will be held in the Davidson College Belk Visual Arts Center, Room 117 (315 N. Main Street Davidson NC 28035).

Website: https://www.facebook.com/AIA.Central.Carolinas

Contact:
Hilary Becker
hibecker@davidson.edu
704-894-2318

“Tales from the Trenches” Local students report on their summer 2011 fieldwork experiences

AIA Society Event: Central Carolinas (Charlotte)

Wednesday, October 19, 2011 - 7:15pm - 9:00pm

Location:
The Pines at Davidson
400 Avinger Lane
Davidson, NC 28036
United States

“Tales from the Trenches” Local students from the Davidson-Charlotte area will report on their 2011 summer fieldwork experiences. The meeting will be an excellent opportunity for sharing ideas and experiences relevant to archaeological fieldwork. Hosted by the Pines at Davidson (400 Avinger Lane • Davidson NC 28036) in the ‘Davidson Room’.

Contact:
Hilary Becker
hibecker@davidson.edu
704-894-2318

The Lure of the Relic: Collecting the Holy Land

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America

AIA Society Event: Central Carolinas (Charlotte)

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - 7:30pm

Location:
Davidson College Visual Arts Center, Room 117
315 N Main St
Davidson, NC
United States

Lecturer: Morag Kersel

Abstract: The Lure of the Relic: Collecting the Holy Land

Contact:
AIA

Dr. Nancy Wilkie: "The World's Cultural Heritage at Risk"

Sponsored by Davidson College

AIA Society Event: Central Carolinas (Charlotte)

Tuesday, April 12, 2011 - 7:30pm - 9:00pm

Location:
Alzarez College Union
Davidson College
Davidson, NC 28035
United States

Nancy Wilkie is the William H. Laird Professor of Classics, Anthropology and the Liberal Arts at Carleton College and president emerita of the Archaeological Institute of America. She also worked as a member of the Department of State's Cultural Property Advisory Committee. Dr. Wilkie will be speaking on the ethics of ownership. Who should own certain artifacts and how does that affect the stories we tell?

This event is sponsored by the Dean Rusk International Studies Program at Davidson College. The event is Free and Open to the public. If you would like more information, please contact Sarah Bennett (704-894-2170).

Website: http://www3.davidson.edu/cms/x42076.xml

Contact:
Hilary Becker
hibecker@davidson.edu

“Divination: It’s Not Just Sheep Livers Anymore!”

Sponsored by Sponsored by the Central Carolinas Society of the Archaeological Institute of America and the Departments of Classics and Religion at Davidson College and the McGaw Lecture Fund.

AIA Society Event: Central Carolinas (Charlotte)

Wednesday, March 9, 2011 - 7:00pm - 8:00pm

Location:
Davidson College: Visual Arts Center 117 (Semans Auditorium). 7:00-8:00 PM.
▼ Van Every/Smith GalleriesAddress:Station is accessible‎ Not true? Show all edits Not true? Write a review - - more info » Placement on map is approximate 315 North Main Street
Davidson, NC 28036-9404
United States

Jean Turfa (Research Associate, University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology “Etruscan). “Divination: It’s Not Just Sheep Livers Anymore!”

Archaeological finds and rediscovered manuscripts have led to a new examination of haruspicy, the divination by sheep liver taught by Etruscan priests to their Roman counterparts. Etruscans also observed thunder for messages from the gods and Dr. Jean Turfa will share some new insights from the first English translation of The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, a book in press for Cambridge University Press (2011).

Contact:
Professor Hilary Becker
hibecker@davidson.edu
704-894-2318

The Art of War: Murals of the Upper Temple of the Jaguars, Chichen Itza

Sponsored by Davidson College

AIA Society Event: Central Carolinas (Charlotte)

Tuesday, February 22, 2011 - 7:00pm - 8:30pm

Location:
Belk Visual Arts Center room 117
Main Street
Davidson, NC 28036
United States

Davidson College Professor Bill Ringle will present a lecture, "The Art of War: Murals of the Upper Temple of the Jaguars, Chichen Itza," on Tuesday, February 22, 2011 at 7:00 pm in Belk Visual Arts Center, Room 117 (Semans Auditorium). This event is free and open to the public.

Website: http://www3.davidson.edu/cms/x41954.xml

Contact:
Hilary Becker
hibecker@davidson.edu
704-894-2318

Rome If You Want To: How Skeletons Reveal Immigrants in the Empire

Sponsored by Departments of Anthropology, Chemistry, and Classics, the Central Carolinas chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America, and the McGaw Lecture Fund, Davidson College

AIA Society Event: Central Carolinas (Charlotte)

Wednesday, January 26, 2011 - 7:00pm - 8:00pm

Location:
Belk Visual Arts Center room 117
Main Street
Davidson, NC 28036
United States

Dr. Kristina Killgrove, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will deliver a lecture entitled, "Rome If You Want To: How Skeletons Reveal Immigrants In The Empire," at 7:00 pm on Wednesday, January 26, 2011, Belk Visual Arts Center 117. A reception will follow the lecture which is sponsored by the Central Carolinas Society of the Archaeological Institute of America and the Davidson College Departments of Classics and Anthropology.

Dr. Killgrove will discuss how throughout Roman history millions of people came to the capital city. Some voluntarily sought out new experiences, but many were brought by force. The lives of the vast majority of immigrants are basically unknown, since historical and epigraphic records tend towards the wealthy, literate elite. This talk details the relatively new technique of strontium and oxygen isotope analyses, carried out on over one hundred human skeletons recovered from two Imperial-era cemeteries in the Roman suburbium. Integrating isotope data with osteological and historical information can illuminate the lives of slaves and foreigners at Rome, adding valuable information about the ancient Romans.

Website: http://www3.davidson.edu/cms/x41225.xml

Contact:
Hilary Becker
hibecker@davidson.edu
704-894-2318

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