The Greeks in Sicily

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America

AIA Society Event: Cleveland

Wednesday, November 13, 2013 - 7:30pm

Location:
Cleveland Museum of Natural History
1 Wade Oval Drive
Cleveland, OH 44106
United States

Lecturer: Barbara Barletta

Abstract: The Greeks in Sicily

Laing Lecture

Contact:
Dede Moore
dede@logan.com
216-932-8132

Ancient Mustang: the Origins of a High Himalayan Kingdom in Nepal

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America

AIA Society Event: Columbus

Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 8:00pm

Location:
OSU Campus, University Hall, Room 014 (Basement)
230 N Oval Mall
Columbus, OH
United States

Lecturer: Mark Aldenderfer

Abstract: Ancient Mustang: the Origins of a High Himalayan Kingdom in Nepal

Norton Lecture

Contact:
Timothy McNiven
mcniven.1@osu.edu
614-299-3140

Genghis Khan and the Mongol Empire

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America

AIA Society Event: Akron-Kent

Thursday, October 24, 2013 - 7:00pm

Location:
Folk Hall Auditorium
153 E Exchange St
Akron , OH 44304
United States

Lecturer: William Fitzhugh

Abstract: Genghis Kahn and the Mongol Empire

Reception precedes lecture at 6:30 PM

Contact:
Evi Gorogianni
eg20@uakron.edu

A Tale of Two Peoples: Phoenicians and Jews in the Land Beyond the River

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America

AIA Society Event: Cleveland

Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 7:30pm

Location:
Cleveland Museum of Natural History
1 Wade Oval Drive
Cleveland, OH 44106
United States

Lecturer: Andrea Berlin

Abstract: A Tale of Two Peoples: Phoenicians and Jews in the Land Beyond the River

Kershaw Lecture

Contact:
Dede Moore
dede@logan.com
216-932-8132

Sex Sells, But Who's Buying? Erotic Imagery on Athenian Vases

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America

AIA Society Event: Akron-Kent

Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 7:00pm

Location:
Kent State University, Satterfield Hall 121
475 Janik Drive
Kent, OH 44240
United States

Lecturer: Kathleen Lynch

Abstract: Sex Sells, But Who’s Buying? Erotic Imagery on Athenian Vases

Receptiom precedes lecture at 6:30 PM

Contact:
Evi Gorogianni
eg20@uakron.edu

DaVinci Code, Templars, and Archaeology

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America

AIA Society Event: Dayton

Saturday, January 11, 2014 - 10:30am

Location:
SunWatch Indian Village/Archaeological Park
2301 W River Rd
Dayton, OH 45417
United States

Lecturer: Michael Fuller

Abstract: DaVinci Code, Templars, and Archaeology

Quigley Lecture

Contact:
Curt Gwaltney
ibkert@yahoo.com

Ossuaries and the Burials of Jesus and James

Sponsored by Cleveland Archaeological Society

AIA Society Event: Cleveland

Wednesday, May 1, 2013 - 7:30pm - 9:00pm

Location:
Cleveland Museum of Natural History
1 Wade Oval
Cleveland, OH 44106
United States

Lecture by Dr. Jodi Magness (University of North Carolina) in the Murch Auditorium of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History (1 Wade Oval, Cleveland, OH 44106) at 7:30 pm.  Lecture is free and open to the public.  Reception follows lecture.

 

Abstract:

How did the Jews of Jerusalem dispose of their dead in the time of Jesus? In this slide-illustrated lecture, we consider the Gospel accounts of Jesus' death and burial in light of archaeological evidence, ending with a discussion of the so-called "Talpiyot tomb" (recently claimed to be the tomb of Jesus and his family) and the "James ossuary" (a stone box claimed to contain the remains of James the Just, the brother of Jesus).

Website: http://www.case.edu/artsci/clsc/casmain.html

Contact:
Dr. John R. Spencer
spencer@jcu.edu

Petra: An Urban Oasis in the Arabian Desert

Sponsored by Cleveland Archaeological Society

AIA Society Event: Cleveland

Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - 7:30pm - 9:00pm

Location:
Cleveland Museum of Natural History
1 Wade Oval
Cleveland, OH 44106
United States

Lecture by Dr. Leigh-Ann Bedal (Pennsylvania State University, Erie) in the Murch Auditorium of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History (1 Wade Oval, Cleveland, OH 44106), at 7:30 pm.  Lecture is free and open to the public.  Reception follows lecture

 

Abstract:

During the 1st century BCE, a small settlement of Arab pastoralists located in a remote valley on the edge of the Arabian Desert, was transformed into one of the great ceremonial and economic centers of the ancient Near East. Petra was the capital of the Nabataean Kingdom and hub of the caravan routes that supplied the Mediterranean World with incense and exotic goods. Known for the many magnificent rock-cut tombs and temple facades etched into the encircling rose red sandstone cliffs, Petra's true wonder may be the infrastructure that allowed this desert metropolis to flourish. Masters of hydraulics, Nabataean engineers constructed a network of channels, dams, cisterns and tunnels to transport and store water for practical uses as well as recreation and ornamental display. This presentation explores technological achievements of the Nabataeans and some of the recent discoveries that reveal Petra's splendor.

 

Website: http://www.case.edu/artsci/clsc/casmain.html

Contact:
Dr. John R. Spencer
spencer@jcu.edu

New Discoveries in the Deep-Water Archaeology of the Black Sea

Sponsored by Cleveland Archaeological Society

AIA Society Event: Cleveland

Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 7:30pm

Location:
Cleveland Museum of Natural History
1 Wade Oval
Cleveland, OH 44106
United States

Lecture by Dr. Dan Davis (Luther College), in the Murch Auditorium of  the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, (1 Wade Oval, Cleveland, OH  44106) at 7:30 pm.  Lecture is free and open to the public.  Reception follows lecture.

 

Abstract: Read more »

Contact:
Dr. John R. Spencer
spencer@jcu.edu

The Newark “Holy Stones”: Science, Politics, and Religion in 19th Century Ohio

Sponsored by SunWatch Indian Village/Archaeological Park

AIA Society Event: Dayton

Saturday, February 16, 2013 - 10:30am - 12:00pm

Location:
SunWatch Indian Village/Archaeological Park
2301 West River Road
Dayton, OH
United States

The “Holy Stones” are a series of carved and polished stones bearing Hebrew inscriptions, said to have been found in the ancient mounds near Newark, Ohio in the 1860s. They were seized upon by those who believed “savage” Indians could not have built Ohio’s mounds, but have been considered frauds since the late 1800s. However, some enthusiasts have recently claimed they might be authentic. What are the “Holy Stones?” Are they evidence of pre-Columbian visitations by ancient Hebrews? If they are clever frauds, what were the perpetrators’ motives?

Contact:
Andrew Sawyer
aia@sunwatch.org
937-268-8199

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