Animate Objects in Mesoamerican Art and Archaeology

Sponsored by SWTAS & Trinity University

AIA Society Event: Southwest TX (San Antonio)

Wednesday, October 12, 2011 - 7:30pm - 9:00pm

Location:
Fiest Room, Trinity University
San Antonio, TX 78212
United States

Dr. Rex Koontz, University of Houston School of Art

Contact:
Jennifer Mathews
jmathews@trinity.edu
210 999-8507

Military Pageantry and Monumental Architecture at El Tajin, Veracruz c. A.D. 1000

Sponsored by SWTAS & University of Texas San Antonio

AIA Society Event: Southwest TX (San Antonio)

Tuesday, October 11, 2011 - 7:30pm - 9:00pm

Location:
University of Texas San Antonio -- room TBA
San Antonio, TX 78249
United States

Dr. Rex Koontz, University of Houston School of Art

Contact:
Jason Yaeger
jason.yaeger@utsa.edu
210 458-7966

Sustainable Living in Bronze Age Crete

Sponsored by College Station Society - AIA

AIA Society Event: College Station

Thursday, February 10, 2011 - 7:00pm - 8:00pm

Location:
Texas A&M University, Architecture C105
College Station, TX 77843
United States

"Sustainable Living in Bronze Age Crete," a lecture by Jennifer Moody of the University of Texas at Austin, is slated for 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 10 in Langford C105 (Texas A&M University, College Station, TX). Moody will discuss the different climates of the Early, Middle and Late Bronze Ages on Crete (ca. 3000-1000 BCE) and the ways in which the ancient Minoans adapted both their architecture and agricultural strategies to reflect the changing environment. A native Texan, Moody has a doctorate in ancient studies. She specializes in the archaeology and environmental history of the Aegean, especially the island of Crete and is author of numerous scholarly publications, including "The Making of the Cretan Landscape" (Manchester University press 1996), which she co-authored with Oliver Rackham. In 1989 she was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship "for extraordinary accomplishments in prehistoric archaeology." The lecture is sponsored the College Station Society of the Archaeological Institute of America and by the Glasscock Humanities Center's Working Group in the History of Art, Architecture and Visual Culture at Texas A&M. For more information, contact: Kevin Glowacki at kglowacki@tamu.edu or Nancy Klein at nklein@tamu.edu.

Contact:
Kevin Glowacki
kglowacki@tamu.edu
979-845-8194

The Magic of Art and Writing in Ancient Egypt

Sponsored by Southwest Texas Archaeological Society (AIA - San Antonio)

AIA Society Event: Southwest TX (San Antonio)

Wednesday, April 6, 2011 - 7:30pm

Location:
Fiesta Room, Trinity University
One Trinity Place
San Antonio, TX 78212
United States

Dr. Lanny Bell, Brown University Read more »

Website: http://www.trinity.edu/swtas/

Contact:
Nicolle Hirschfeld
nhirschf@trinity.edu
210.999.7125

The Land of Cypriot Aphrodite and the Kingdom of Ancient Paphos: The Palaepaphos Urban Landscape Project

Sponsored by Southwest Texas Archaeological Society (AIA - San Antonio)

AIA Society Event: Southwest TX (San Antonio)

Monday, March 28, 2011 - 7:30pm

Location:
Chapman Auditorium, Trinity University
One Trinity Place
San Antonio, TX 78212
United States

Dr. Maria Iacovou, Department of History and Archaeology, University of Cyprus

The University Seminars Program of the Alexander S. Onassis Public Benefit Foundation (USA) sponsors eminent scholars in the area of Hellenic history and cultureto offer lectures, seminars and courses at universities.  We are honored to be included in Dr. Iacovou’s itinerary.

Website: http://www.trinity.edu/swtas/

Contact:
Nicolle Hirschfeld
nhirschf@trinity.edu
210.999.7125

Late Bronze Anchorages of the Carmel Coast and Their Mediterranean Trade Networks

Sponsored by Southwest Texas Archaeological Society (AIA - San Antonio)

AIA Society Event: Southwest TX (San Antonio)

Tuesday, March 1, 2011 - 7:30pm

Location:
Ruth Taylor Recital Hall, Trinity University
One Trinity Place
San Antonio, TX 78212
United States

Michal Artzy, Head, Hatter Laboratory, Recanati Institute for Maritime Studies, University of Haifa

The Carmel Ridge and its environs had at least three active anchorages sited on river outlets during the latter half of the Late Bronze Age (approximately the 14th century to the first years of the 12th century BCE).  Tel Akko and Tel Abu-Hawam are situated on the Bay of Akko/Haifa, on the northern confines of the Carmel Ridge, while Tel Nami is located on its western shadow.  These anchorages were well-positioned at junctions of the north-south maritime and the east-west ‘sea to desert’ terrestrial routes, and imported material goods were found at all three. Read more »

Contact:
Nicolle Hirschfeld
nhirschf@trinity.edu
210.999.7125

Putting Petra in Landscape Mode: Alternative Archaeologies at a World Wonder

Sponsored by Classics Department, University of Texas

AIA Society Event: Central Texas (Austin)

Friday, January 21, 2011 - 4:00pm - 5:00pm

Location:
University of Texas at Austin
1.306 Mezes
Austin, TX 78712
United States

The William J. Battle Lecture Series, hosted by the graduate students of the Department of Classics at the University of Texas at Austin, is pleased to announce its Fourth Annual Public Lecture.  Dr. Susan Alcock, Director of the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Joukowsky Family Professor in Archaeology, and Professor of Classics at Brown University, will be speaking on her recent work at Petra, Jordan.  The lecture is open to the public and a short reception will be held after the talk.  The lecture will take place in 1.306 Mezes on the University of Texas campus.

Contact:
Ann Morgan
morgan.ann@gmail.com
512-471-7890

Remnants from “A World In Miniature”: Life Aboard The Steamboat Heroine, 1832 - 1838

Sponsored by Southwest Texas Archaeological Society (AIA-San Antonio)

AIA Society Event: Southwest TX (San Antonio)

Thursday, April 28, 2011 - 7:30pm

Location:
Chapman Auditorium, Trinity University
San Antonio, TX 78212
United States

Popular perception of life on board 19th century steamboats is often an idyllic one, based on works such as Mark Twain’s view from a pilot house. Such narratives contribute to the status of steamboats as an American icon, but current historical research and an increasing number of archaeological examples provides a more complex view of steamboat life. One of the most recent examples is Heroine (1832-38), excavated from 2003-2008 near Fort Towson, Oklahoma on the Red River. One of the aspects of the wreck is the collection of personal possessions recovered during excavation. These artifacts provide unique insight into steamboat life, but also highlight larger challenges in archaeological interpretation due to active site formation processes of the river, a long history of salvage and variable exposure. Despite these challenges the findings touch on a wide range of topics, including commercialism, economic expansion, slavery, and social division during the 19th century when combined with the historical record. Heroine serves as a litmus test for modern perceptions of life on board a 19th century steamboat through this utilization of both the material remains and the historical record. The lecturer, Heather Jones, is a Trinity alumna ('07) and now a Masters' student in the Nautical Archaeology Program, Texas A&M University.

Website: http://www.trinity.edu/swtas/

Contact:
Nicolle Hirschfeld
nhirschf@trinity.edu
(210) 999-7125

Herodotus, Aristotle, and Sounding Weights: The Deep Sea as a Frontier in the Classical World

Sponsored by Southwest Texas Archaeological Society (AIA-San Antonio)

AIA Society Event: Southwest TX (San Antonio)

Tuesday, February 22, 2011 - 7:30pm

Location:
Fiesta Room, Trinity University
San Antonio, TX 78212
United States

Lecturer: John Peter Oleson

Abstract: Herodotus, Aristotle, and Sounding Weights: The Deep Sea as a Frontier in the Classical World

Norton Lecture

Website: http://www.trinity.edu/swtas/

Contact:
Nicolle Hirschfeld
nhirschf@trinity.edu
(210) 999-7125

Learning the Ropes: Archaeology, Ancient Technology, and Apprenticeship (in Ancient Egypt)

Sponsored by Southwest Texas Archaeological Society (AIA-San Antonio)

AIA Society Event: Southwest TX (San Antonio)

Monday, February 7, 2011 - 7:30pm

Location:
Fiesta Room, Trinity University
San Antonio, TX 78212
United States

The ancient Egyptians had a rich crafts tradition, which we can trace in the lively representations in tombs, and in a broad range of archaeological evidence. Studying ancient Egyptian technology brings to the fore that these crafts are rooted in a system of apprenticeship which enabled both tradition and innovation.

Website: http://www.trinity.edu/swtas/

Contact:
Nicolle Hirschfeld
nhirschf@trinity.edu
(210) 999-7125

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