New Thoughts on Egyptian Pot Burials

Archaeology News - January 5, 2017

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA—Science News reports that bioarchaeologist Ronika Power and Egyptologist Yann Tristant of Macquarie University reviewed studies of burials in ceramic pots at 46 archaeological sites, most of which were found near the Nile River and dated to between 3300 and 1650 B.C. It had been thought that such pot burials were a make-do effort for poor children, but the researchers found that more than half of the sites in the study contained adult remains in pot burials. And of 746 children’s burials in the study, 338 employed wooden coffins, while 329 used pots. The rest of the children were buried in baskets or limestone containers. One pot held an infant along with beads covered in gold foil. Other pots held offerings of gold, ivory, clothing, and ceramics. Power and Tristant suggest that rather than a necessity, a pot may have been chosen as a burial vessel to represent the womb, and symbolize rebirth into the afterlife. For more, go to “A Pharaoh’s Last Fleet.”

Categories: Blog

Scientists Look For New Sources of Ancient DNA

Archaeology News - January 5, 2017

LEIPZIG, GERMANY—NPR reports that Matthias Meyer of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology led a team of scientists searching for new sources of ancient human DNA for study. Since the fossil record is limited, the researchers have begun to analyze the dirt from floors of caves to look for the dust of degraded bones. Those samples could yield tiny DNA fragments, once DNA from recent cave visitors has been excluded. These additional DNA samples could help scientists learn about the lives of Neanderthals over time, and how often they may have interbred with modern humans. “Can we understand what happened to them in the end?” asked Janet Kelso, also of the Max Planck Institute. “That may not be something you can tell from the sequence, but it would be interesting to try.” For more, go to “Early Man Cave.”

Categories: Blog

Colonial-Era Cannon Recovered in North Carolina

Archaeology News - January 5, 2017

BRUNSWICK COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA—According to a report in Port City Daily, a Colonial-era cannon was recovered from the Cape Fear River near the Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson State Historic Site by a dredging company. The 93-inch-long cannon has been wrapped in burlap and is under a light spray of water to keep it wet until conservation can begin at Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson. Site Manager Jim McKee said that the cannon has no visible markings, but it appears to have burst, perhaps as the result of a casting flaw. McKee added that he thinks the cannon was in use before 1756, and that it was found empty. For more on archaeology in the vicinity of North Carolina, go to “Medicine on the High Seas.”

Categories: Blog

900-Year-Old Murals Discovered in Northern China

Archaeology News - January 5, 2017

SHANXI PROVINCE, CHINA—Xinhua News reports that a 900-year-old tomb adorned with murals has been found in northern China. The tomb was robbed, and lacks any artifacts or human remains, but archaeologists suspect that the tomb was constructed for aristocrats. The upper part of the murals, which are painted on a white background, depict acts of filial piety, according to Zhang Guanghui of the Shanxi Provincial Archaeological Research Institute. Images of people working and cooking make up the lower parts of the murals. Pictures of herdsmen and cattle were found at the gate of the tomb. Zhang added that all of the murals also have floral, animal, and cloud motifs. “We have seen several tombs with murals from the Jin Dynasty [A.D. 1115–1234], but such well-preserved ones are a rarity,” he said. For more, go to “China’s Legendary Flood.”

Categories: Blog

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