2,000-Year-Old Illustration Depicts Village in Japan

Archaeology News - March 27, 2018

IBARAKI, JAPAN—According to a report in The Asahi Shimbun, nine pieces of unglazed earthenware dating to the Yayoi Pottery Culture period (300 B.C.–A.D. 300) were uncovered at the Nakagawara site on the island of Honshu. When the pieces were fitted together, researchers from the Ibaraki Municipal Education Board found images of five wooden structures built on stilts with ridge roofs and ornamental cornices. The center building is smaller than the others, while another has a ladder leading to a raised platform, and yet another has munamochi-bashira, or pillars to support a shrine’s gables. “The structure with munamochi-bashira must be a key structure,” said Tadashi Kurosaki, director of the Museum of Yayoi Culture in Osaka Prefecture. “The etchings were clearly meant to portray in detail a daily scene in the settlement.” For more, go to “Japan’s Early Anglers.”

Categories: Blog

Rare, Ancient Egyptian Relief Identified in England

Archaeology News - March 24, 2018

SWANSEA, WALES—BBC News reports that a rare image of Hatshepsut, one of five women to have ruled Egypt as pharaoh, has been found in the collections at Swansea University. The front side of the sculpted relief fragment shows the head of a figure whose face is missing, and a fan. A cobra on the figure’s forehead marks her as a pharaoh. Egyptology lecturer Ken Griffin and his students spotted the image of Hatshepsut in an old photograph while reviewing the contents of Sir Henry Wellcome’s collection, which came to the university in 1971. Griffin has contacted the researchers of the Polish Archaeological Mission to Egypt, who are excavating, recording, and restoring the temple of Hatshepsut at Deir el-Bahri. They may be able to find the spot where the relief was once attached to a wall. For more, go to “Dawn of Egyptian Writing.”

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New Thoughts on Anatolia’s First Farmers

Archaeology News - March 24, 2018

LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND—A new study suggests that hunter-gatherers living on the Anatolian plateau some 10,000 years ago may have invented farming on their own, or learned to farm through their relationships with their neighbors, according to a Haaretz report. At the hunter-gatherer village known as Boncuklu, Douglas Baird of the University of Liverpool and his colleagues discovered stone tools, burned seeds, wheat chaff, and weeds known to have grown in early farmers’ fields. An abundance of pests also suggests the residents of Boncuklu farmed. Bones from the site suggest they kept sheep and goats. But the tools at Boncuklu and other sites in central Anatolia are unlike those found at other early farming sites in the Fertile Crescent, suggesting the Levantine farmers did not replace the Anatolians. “In addition, the ancient DNA evidence now clearly shows that there is a distinctive local gene pool in the early Neolithic at places like Boncuklu, different from the genetics of Levantine Neolithic populations,” Baird said. Anatolians who picked up farming survived to pass their genes on to later Neolithic populations in central and western Anatolia. To read about studies suggesting Europe's first farmers were also its first carpenters, go to “The Neolithic Toolkit.”

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Repair Work at Pompeii Reveals Garden, Frescoes

Archaeology News - March 24, 2018

NAPLES, ITALY—Massimo Osanna, superintendent for Pompeii, announced the discovery of public and private buildings that have not been seen since the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79. ANSA reports the excavations were undertaken to improve the stability and prevent collapses in the Regio V area of the ancient city. The discovery of the buildings, gardens, and porticoes was a surprise, Osanna said. “And, for the first time as academics,” he added, “we have come across objects, plasterwork, and frescoes that have never been restored, that are in their original shape and color without having been tampered with in past restoration.” The soil from an area thought to have been a garden in antiquity will be analyzed as well as the contents of amphoras recovered from its southeastern corner. For more on Pompeii, go to “Food and Wine Gardens: Pompeii, Italy.”

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Medieval Settlement Unearthed in Dublin

Archaeology News - March 24, 2018

DUBLIN, IRELAND—According to a report in The Journal a well-preserved settlement dating to the twelfth century has been found at a construction site in Dublin by archaeologists from Aisling Collins Archaeology Services. The site consists of dwellings, complete with gardens, cobbled stones, and smaller outbuildings where animals were probably housed. The excavation team recovered leather shoes, a wooden spoon and bowl, a copper alloy key, and a piece of slate inscribed with two birds and a picture of a figure riding a horse and carrying a shield and sword. They also unearthed items dating to the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, including jug handles and evidence of a pit thought to have been used to tan hides. The artifacts will be housed in the National Museum of Ireland. To read about recent discoveries made in Cork, go to “Irish Vikings.”

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World War II Shipwreck Discovered Near the Solomon Islands

Archaeology News - March 23, 2018

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON—Live Science reports that the wreckage of USS Juneau, a light cruiser lost on November 3, 1942, during the Battle of Guadalcanal, has been found under more than 13,000 feet of water in the South Pacific by Vulcan, Inc., an exploration and conservation company led by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen. Allen and his team detected the wreckage with side-scan sonar, and identified it with video taken by a remotely operated underwater vehicle. More than 680 American sailors, including five brothers, were killed when the ship was cut in half by Japanese torpedoes and sank. Although the Navy usually prohibits family members from being assigned to the same ship, Joseph, Francis, Albert, Madison, and George Sullivan had received special permission to serve together. Naval historians say the brothers’ deaths became a rallying cry for allied forces. The U.S. Navy has since named two destroyers The Sullivans after the brothers. The current ship’s motto is “We Stick Together.” To read about another recent discovery of a World War II ship, go to “Finding Indianapolis.”

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Prehistoric Native American Sites Excavated in New Jersey

Archaeology News - March 23, 2018

CAMDEN, NEW JERSEY—According to a report in The Philadelphia Inquirer, a total of some 10,000 Native American artifacts have been uncovered from two archaeological sites in Camden. Almost 1,300 artifacts were recovered at the first site, which is thought to have been a short-term camp. Among those objects, archaeologist Ilene Grossman-Bailey found a rectangular ceramic cooking vessel and a hearth containing charcola that has been dated to 1400 B.C. The second, slightly older site may have started as a temporary camp, but then it likely became a year-round settlement. It yielded ceramics; grinding and hammer stones thought to have been used to grind maize, legumes, and barley; and the burned bones of deer and other mammals, turtles, and wild fowl. A tool bearing protein residue may have been used to process the meat. Many of the artifacts at this site were recovered from a 20-foot-long ditch. “We don’t really know what it is,” said Grossman-Bailey. “There really isn’t anything else like it in New Jersey, although similar features have been found near the Chesapeake and in New England.” She thinks it may have been part of a house.

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Five Additional Neanderthal Genomes Mapped

Archaeology News - March 23, 2018

LEIPZIG, GERMANY—Seeker reports that scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology have sequenced the genomes of five Neanderthals who lived between 39,000 and 47,000 years ago. The samples were obtained from the remains of male and female individuals, which were unearthed in Belgium, France, Croatia, and the Russian Caucasus. “The addition of the genome sequences of these five Neanderthals presented in this study doubles the number of genomes available,” explained Mateja Hajdinjak of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. The samples were taken from bones and teeth, ground into a fine powder, and treated with a mild hypochlorite solution to remove any contaminants. Analysis of the genomes revealed that these five Neanderthals shared a common ancestor some 150,000 years ago with another Neanderthal individual whose genome was sequenced from remains found in Siberia. Researcher Svante Paabo added that the new research supports previous findings suggesting that Neanderthals and Denisovans shared an unidentified common ancestor some 400,000 years ago. To read about a new method for recovering genetic material left behind by early humans, go to “Caveman Genetics.”

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Germany Repatriates Olmec Artifacts to Mexico

Archaeology News - March 21, 2018

MUNICH, GERMANY—According to a Deutsche Welle report, German officials handed over two 3,000-year-old Olmec busts to Mexico in a ceremony held earlier this week. German authorities seized the two wooden sculptures, and about 1,000 other artifacts, from an antiquities dealer in 2008. The sculptures were then stored in the Bavarian State Archaeological Collection. The repatriated sculptures are thought to have been looted in the 1980s from El Manati, an archaeological site in eastern Mexico, where they are believed to have been buried along with 13 other artifacts that were excavated from the site by archaeologists. These items included axes and stone knives. “The recovery is very significant, since Olmec culture represents one of the first civilizations in ancient Mexico and only 13 pieces exist with the same characteristics,” said Maria Villarreal of Mexico’s National Institute of History and Anthropology. The Olmec busts will eventually be exhibited in Mexico’s National Museum of Anthropology. To read in-depth about the Olmec, go to “Kings of Cooperation.”

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Seventeenth-Century Decorations Uncovered in English Castle

Archaeology News - March 21, 2018

NORTHUMBERLAND, ENGLAND—Wall paintings dating to the seventeenth century have been uncovered at Lindisfarne Castle, which was originally constructed as a fort in 1550 on Holy Island, off the coast of northeastern England. The Guardian reports that the images were found under layers of paint and plaster in the castle’s old kitchen and in one of the bedrooms by conservators. “They used charcoal to draw it, very simple carbon, and there are areas of red pigment so they might have been painted and colored,” said house steward Nick Lewis. “We know it was done professionally, so you didn’t just sit and do it yourself, and in those days there was a guild of wall painters who they would have used.” Lewis said the find surprised him, since the building was originally constructed for military use. And, because the decorations were found in two different parts of the structure, the entire building may have received similar treatment. The paintings will be stabilized and restored. To read in-depth about nearby Bamburgh Castle, go to “Letter From England: Stronghold of the Kings in the North.”

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Two Historic Ships Discovered in Virginia

Archaeology News - March 21, 2018

WASHINGTON, D.C.—According to a WTOP report, two shipwrecks have been unearthed at a construction site in Old Town Alexandria, Virginia. An eighteenth-century ship was found nearby in 2015. The three vessels are thought to have been used as landfill when the port was filled in. City archaeologist Eleanor Breen said additional evidence of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century wharves, piers, maritime vessels, and commercial industries may still be uncovered at the site. To read in-depth about shipwrecks in the Great Lakes, go to “Shipwreck Alley.”

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Isotope Analysis Offers Clues to Maya Diet

Archaeology News - March 21, 2018

PANAMA CITY, PANAMA—Science Magazine reports that chemical analysis of the isotopes in animal bones unearthed in the ancient Maya city of Seibal determined which of the animals ate a diet rich in forest plant material, and were therefore wild, and which animals ate maize, and were therefore kept by humans. Archaeologist Ashley Sharpe of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute said dozens of turkeys, dogs, and one large cat that may have been a jaguar had all been fed maize-based diets. The bones of those dogs have been radiocarbon dated to between 450 and 300 B.C., making them the earliest known animals to have been domesticated by the Maya. These small, Chihuahua-like dog bones bore no signs of butchery, although Sharpe notes that doesn’t mean they weren't consumed. One pair of dogs from this period had isotope levels that suggested they had lived in Guatemala’s volcanic highlands before they were buried near a pyramid in Seibal’s central plaza. The cats, whose remains date to between 450 and 350 B.C., may have served a similar ceremonial use. The maize-fed turkeys lived between A.D. 175 and 950, at a time when dog remains became extremely scarce, indicating they could have replaced dogs as the Maya’s primary food source. For more on domestication of animals as food sources, go to “The Rabbit Farms of Teotihuacán.”

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Iceland Ice Cores Date Medieval Volcano

Archaeology News - March 21, 2018

CAMBRIDGE, ENGLAND—According to a Live Science report, researchers led by volcanologist Clive Oppenheimer of the University of Cambridge examined ice cores and tree ring data from Iceland, in order to calculate precise dates for the medieval eruption of the Eldgjá volcano, and determine whether the massive lava flood and sulphurous gases emitted by the eruption could have been witnessed by the Viking and Celtic migrants who settled Iceland in A.D. 874. The study indicates the lava flowed from the spring of A.D. 939 through the autumn of 940. These dates also correspond with records of haze, cold summers, and food shortages in Europe. Oppenheimer says the dates indicate that some of Iceland’s first settlers, and perhaps two generations of their descendants, may have witnessed and survived the cataclysm, and eventually translated their experiences, including the ensuing devastation and famine, into the Voluspá, a poem written around A.D. 961. It describes a volcanic eruption and meteorological events signifying the end of the island’s pagan gods and is credited with paving the way for the Christianization of Iceland. To read more about archaeology in Iceland, go to “The Blackener’s Cave.”

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2,000-Year-Old Liquid Reportedly Recovered in China

Archaeology News - March 20, 2018

SHAANXI PROVINCE, CHINA—According to a Xinhua report, a Qin Dynasty (221–207 B.C.) cemetery in western China has yielded some 260 artifacts, including a bronze kettle sealed with natural fibers that still contained about ten ounces of milky white liquid. Xu Weihong of the Shaanxi Province Archaeological Institute said analysis of the liquid suggests it had been fermented. The kettle is thought to have been a sacrificial vessel used for worship rituals, like many of the objects in the tomb. Other artifacts include a bronze sword measuring about two feet long. Nicks on its blade indicate it had been used in battle. A five-inch-long turtle shell bearing punch marks on its inside and burn marks on its edge was also recovered. It may have been used by a fortune teller for divination purposes. To read about another recent discovery in China, go to "Underground Party."

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1,000-Year-Old Cathedral Foundations Uncovered in England

Archaeology News - March 20, 2018

HERTFORDSHIRE, ENGLAND—BBC News reports that the foundations of the original A.D. 1077 apse were uncovered at St. Albans Cathedral under just three feet of soil. “One of our major aims was to confirm its presence and confirm the abbey was one of the early Norman cathedrals,” said Ross Lane, director of the excavation for the Canterbury Archaeological Trust. The excavation also uncovered approximately 20 graves dating to the eleventh and twelfth centuries. “They are clustered close to the walls in tile-lined tombs,” Lane said. The people in the graves are thought to have either lived in the abbey or been its benefactors in order to have received such honored burial spots. A new visitor center will be built on the site. For more, go to “Letter From England: Writing on the Church Wall.”

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Nineteenth-Century Gold Mine Found in New Zealand

Archaeology News - March 20, 2018

WAIKAIA, NEW ZEALAND—The Southland Times reports that traces of a late nineteenth-century gold mine were found on New Zealand’s South Island by archaeology consultants engaged by the forestry company IFS Growth. The consultants first spotted the site, which is now covered over with heavy scrub, in historic aerial photographs. “To everyone’s surprise, we could see an extensive and largely intact gold mining complex consisting of water races, reservoirs, sluice workings, and sludge channels,” said Matthew Sole of Kopuwai Consulting. Miners’ huts were also part of the complex. Known as the Muddy Terraces site, the mine yielded as much as 42 ounces of gold during one five-week period, according to one newspaper account. Once the site’s boundaries have been determined, the forestry team will continue their harvest around it. To read about a discovery in Australia, go to “Death by Boomerang.”

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Horned-Eye Bead Found in Tomb in China

Archaeology News - March 17, 2018

CHANGSHA, CHINA—Xinhua reports that an unusual, horned eye-shaped bead was recovered from a tomb in southern China dating to the Warring States Period (475–221 B.C.). “It is in blue and white and incomplete, with only seven horns remaining around a base bead,” said Xi Peishen of the Hunan Institute of Archaeology. “It looks like the compound eye of a dragonfly.” The bead measures about an inch in diameter, weighs about an ounce, and may have been used as a decoration on clothes or furniture. Similar beads have been found in Egypt, Mesopotamia, Persia, and India, and are thought to have been introduced to China through contact with West Asian civilizations during the Spring and Autumn period (779–476 B.C.). The tomb in which the bead was found is one of about 200 dating to the Warring States Period at the site. To read about another recent discovery in China, go to “Underground Party.”

Categories: Blog

Tool Discovery Pushes Back Onset of Middle Stone Age

Archaeology News - March 17, 2018

WASHINGTON, D.C.—According to a Science News report, Rick Potts of the Smithsonian Institution and his colleagues suggest that early humans may have entered the Middle Stone Age tens of thousands of years earlier than previously thought. The researchers analyzed soil samples taken from the Olorgesailie Basin of Kenya’s Rift Valley, and noted that frequent changes in the climate and earthquakes transformed the resources available to human ancestors. Erosion has destroyed about 180,000 years of the geological record at the site, but Potts said that during that time, there must have been a rapid period of evolution because lumps of pigment and new types of tools appear when the geological record resumed some 320,000 years ago. The toolmakers had shifted from sharpening large hand axes to making smaller tools, such as sharp flakes mounted on spears to be used as projectiles, and blades and points made from obsidian. Obsidian is not available locally, which suggests the toolmakers had to travel and perhaps interact with other human groups to obtain it. No hominid fossils have been found at the site, however, so researchers cannot be sure that Homo sapiens made the artifacts. For more, go to “The First Toolkit.”

Categories: Blog

15,000-Year-Old African Genomes Analyzed

Archaeology News - March 16, 2018

JENA, GERMANY—Science Magazine reports that an international team of scientists has extracted DNA from the ear bones of human remains unearthed at Grotte des Pigeons, an undisturbed, 15,000-year-old cemetery in a cave in Morocco. Known as Iberomaurusians because they were thought to have come from the Iberian Peninsula, these hunter-gatherers made microliths similar to those of Europe’s Gravettian culture. But the genomic analysis suggests the people buried in the cave were related to Natufians, from the Middle East, with whom they probably shared a common group of ancestors who lived in North Africa or the Middle East more than 15,000 years ago. The team also detected DNA linked to sub-Saharan Africans in the bones from Grotte des Pigeons. This genetic material may have come from contemporaneous or ancestral migrants from the south. To read about another discovery of ancient human remains in Morocco, go to “Homo sapiens, Earlier Still.”

Categories: Blog

Waste From 1,700-Year-Old Feast Found in Scotland

Archaeology News - March 16, 2018

ORKNEY, SCOTLAND—The Scotsman reports that the site of an Iron Age feast has been found at The Cairns, on the island of South Ronaldsay. Martin Carruthers of the University of the Highlands and Islands said the bones of some 10,000 animals, including horses, cattle, red deer, and otters, have been found in a dump at the site, suggesting they had been cooked and eaten on the cliff overlooking Windwick Bay during a single event. Traces of metalworking have also been found at the site. Carruthers thinks the feast may have been held to celebrate the conclusion of making a big batch of brooches and pins, which may have been handed out to the members of the community during the party. A large building at the site may have been home to the people who organized the making of jewelry and the event. “These items are probably of such high value that people could never have the capacity to pay back the debt,” Carruthers surmised. “It holds you in your place. This whole event is about maintaining society.” To read in-depth about archaeology in the area, go to “Neolithic Europe's Remote Heart.”

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