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Shops Found Near Ancient City Center of Aspendos

August 28, 2017

ANKARA, TURKEY—The Daily Sabah reports that shops and warehouses have been discovered near the center of the ancient city of Aspendos, located on the southwestern coast of Turkey. Archaeologist Veli Köse of Haceteppe University said valuable materials may have been sold and stored at the site, which he thinks also housed offices. The excavation has also recovered Hellenistic and Roman coins, a glass amphora, perfume bottles, bronze belt buckles, bone hair pins, jewelry, and nails. For more on archaeology in Turkey, go to “Figure of Distinction.”

Categories: Blog

Ming Dynasty Playwright’s Tomb Identified in China

August 28, 2017

NANCHANG, CHINA—The tomb of sixteenth-century playwright Tang Xianzu has been identified in a cluster of Ming Dynasty (A.D. 1368‒1644) tombs in east China’s Jiangxi Province, according to a Xinhua report. Tang is remembered for four plays known as the Four Dreams, and his masterpiece, a romance called Peony Pavilion. The tomb is thought to hold the remains of Tang and his third wife, Fu. His second wife is also thought to have been buried in the cemetery. Several epitaphs found in the cemetery may have been written by Tang. “The epitaphs can help us learn more about the calligraphy, art, and literature in Tang’s time,” said Xu Changqing of the Jiangxi Provincial Cultural Relics and Archaeology Research Institute. In addition, the discovery has yielded information about Tang’s life, his family relationships, and his ancestry. A monument to the playwright is planned for the site. To read about another recent discovery in China, go to “Tomb Couture.”

Categories: Blog

Monumental Chamber Tombs Discovered in Greece

August 28, 2017

NEMEA, GREECE—Tornos News reports that two chamber tombs have been discovered at the Mycenaean cemetery at Aedonia by a team led by Konstantine Kissas of the Corinth Antiquities Ephory and Kim Shelton of the University of California, Berkeley. One of the tombs, which had been looted in the 1970s, has been dated to between 1350 and 1200 B.C. The other tomb is thought to be a few hundred years older. Burials were found in three pits and on the floor of the second chamber. One of the pits measured more than 12 feet long, and had been covered with large stone slabs. It contained the remains of three people. A second pit contained two more burials, copper arrows, and five knives, two of which had handles decorated with fine gold leaves. Fragments of two piers, and monumental vases decorated with flowers, were found in the third pit. The burials on the floor were accompanied by simple vases and stone buttons. For more on archaeology in Greece, go to “The Minoans of Crete.”

Categories: Blog

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