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Wood Henge Discovered in Northern England

January 3, 2018

EAST YORKSHIRE, ENGLAND—The Yorkshire Post reports that traces of a 4,000-year-old wooden henge have been unearthed at the Little Catwick Quarry, located near the North Sea coast. The wooden posts were encircled with a ditch and bank with entrances facing northwest and southeast. A pit in the middle of the circle contained heavily burned stones. Additional burned stones were found discarded in the entrances. “It is possible that bodies were brought there to be cremated and then the remains buried elsewhere,” said lead archaeologist John Tibbles. A cemetery dating to the late Neolithic and early Bronze Age periods has been found about a mile away from the henge site. Tibbles thinks the two sites could be linked. But the burned stones could also have been used to heat a sauna, he explained. Stones may have been heated at a fire and carried into a sauna building with a hearth surrounded by ledge-style seating. To read about another henge site in England, go to “The Square Inside Avebury’s Circles.”

Categories: Blog

Late Period Temple Unearthed in Egypt’s Nile Delta

January 3, 2018

CAIRO, EGYPT—Ahram Online reports that mudbrick walls, furnaces, the bases of limestone columns, pottery, and other artifacts dating to Egypt’s Late Period (664–332 B.C.) have been uncovered at the Tel Al-Pharaeen archaeological site in Lower Egypt. The walls and limestone columns are thought to have been part of a temple in the ancient city of Buto, while the furnaces may have been used to prepare offerings to the temple’s gods. Ayman Ashmawy of Egypt’s Ministry of Antiquities said the site yielded a limestone statue of King Psamtik I seated on a throne, and the base of a black granite statue that may have also depicted the ruler. It is missing its head, neck, base, and parts of its arms and legs, but the body is shown wearing a shendit, or royal kilt. Hossam Ghoneim, head of the excavation team, said part of a quartzite statue of the god Hur, a fragment of a hand sculpted from granite and bearing an inscription of the royal cartouche of King Psamtik I, and part of a menit necklace, the symbol of the goddess Hathor, were also recovered. For more, go to “Dawn of Egyptian Writing.”

Categories: Blog

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