Subscribe to Archaeology News feed
Updated: 2 hours 12 min ago

6,000-Year-Old Longhouses Uncovered in Scotland

February 16, 2019

ANGUS, SCOTLAND—The Scotsman reports that traces of two structures recently radiocarbon dated to 6,000 years ago have been uncovered in eastern Scotland, according to Ronan Toolis of GUARD Archaeology. The larger one, which was used for around 500 years, is thought to be the largest known Neolithic hall in Britain. Early farmers are believed to have used the buildings as living and food processing quarters, and may even have sheltered animals in them as well. The smaller of the two halls, Toolis said, was occupied for 1,000 years, and may eventually provide new insights into Scotland’s early farming communities. Smaller structures and pits in use during the same period were found around the two halls. Around 2,000 years after the smaller building went out of use, a village was built on the site. It yielded a bronze sword, a wooden sword sheath, and a bronze bangle, Toolis added. To read in-depth about other discoveries in Scotland dating to the same period as the longhouses, go to “Neolithic Europe's Remote Heart.”

Categories: Blog

2,000-Year-Old Village Spotted in Poland’s Tuchola Forest

February 15, 2019

WARSAW, POLAND—Science in Poland reports that a 2,000-year-old settlement, complete with surrounding fields, farms, and roads, has been discovered in northern Poland’s Tuchola Forest. Mateusz Sosnowski of Nicolaus Copernicus University and Jerzy Czerniec of the Polish Academy of Sciences spotted the untouched site, which covers about 420 acres, with airborne laser-scanning equipment and dated it with pottery recovered on the ground. Sosnowski said the layout of the fields suggests people may have been using a farming system thought to have been developed in the Middle Ages. Soil analysis indicates rye was grown in areas with fertile soil. Land less suitable for agriculture was avoided, Sosnowski added. To read about the use of airborne laser scanning in Cambodia, go to “Angkor Urban Sprawl.”

Categories: Blog

Possible Neanderthal Footprint Discovered in Gibraltar

February 15, 2019

SEVILLE, SPAIN—Yahoo! News reports that an international team of researchers studying a sand dune overlooking Gibraltar’s Catalan Bay has discovered a footprint thought to have been left by a teenaged hominin some 29,000 years ago. The individual who left the print is thought to have stood between about 42 and 50 inches tall, and may have been a young Neanderthal, since evidence of Neanderthal occupation of the island has been found in Gorham’s Cave, which overlooks the Alboran Sea. The footprint was found among prints made by red deer, ibex, aurochs, leopards, and straight-tusked elephants. To read about evidence of artwork produced by Neanderthals discovered in Gorham's Cave, go to “Symbolic Neanderthals.”

Categories: Blog

Well-Preserved Narcissus Fresco Found in Pompeii

February 15, 2019

ROME, ITALY—ANSA reports that a well-preserved fresco depicting Narcissus gazing at his own reflection has been uncovered in a house in Pompeii. According to Greek mythology, the beautiful hunter Narcissus, son of a river god and a nymph, was punished by the goddess Nemesis for his treatment of Echo, a mountain nymph who loved him. Nemesis lured Narcissus to a pool where he fell in love with his own reflection and was unable to leave it. Alfonsina Russo, director of the archaeological site, said the room where the Narcissus fresco was discovered had a staircase leading to a floor above it, and a storeroom containing glass containers, amphoras, and a bronze funnel. Massimo Osanna, superintendent of Pompeii Archaeological Park, said other paintings in the house, found in fragments on the floor, depict maenads and satyrs, delicate floral elements, griffins, cornucopia, flying cherubs, and fighting animals. These images were damaged when the building’s ceiling collapsed under the weight of volcanic stones from the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, but they will be reassembled. The excavators also uncovered a bronze bucket next to the home’s impluvium—a sunken area designed to collect rainwater from the roof. For more, go to “Return to Pompeii.”

Categories: Blog

Wreckage of World War II Aircraft Carrier Found in South Pacific

February 14, 2019

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON—CBS News reports that the wreckage of USS Hornet, sunk on October 26, 1942, during the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, has been found under more than 17,000 feet of water in the South Pacific Ocean. The vessel was detected near the Solomon Islands by the crew of Petrel, a research vessel established by Paul Allen, cofounder of Microsoft, who died last year. The expedition team began their search for Hornet with information from official deck logs and action reports from nine other U.S. warships that fought in the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, and subsequently came upon the aircraft carrier on their first search of the area with a deep-sea sonar drone. The warship’s identity was confirmed by its hull classification symbol CV-8, spotted with video footage taken by a remotely operated vehicle. Hornet played two key roles during World War II, including launching the first airborne attack on Tokyo in April 1942, and causing heavy damage to Japanese aircraft carriers and aircraft during the pivotal Battle of Midway in June of the same year. To read about the discovery of the wreckage of another World War II ship, go to “Finding Indianapolis.”

Categories: Blog

Archaeologists Investigate Florida’s Cape Canaveral

February 14, 2019

BREVARD COUNTY, FLORIDA—WFTV News reports that team members of the Cape Canaveral Archaeological Mitigation Project are recording sites and rescuing artifacts vulnerable to destruction by hurricanes and storm surge on central Florida’s west coast. “Due to climate change and sea level rise, a lot of these sites are going to be eroded in 20 to 25 years,” said Thomas Penders, cultural resources manager for the 45th Space Wing. The team members are creating a 3-D map of the historic spacecraft launch complexes at Cape Canaveral, and examining a Native American burial mound at the Air Force Station with ground-penetrating radar. A 1960s missile graveyard and a fish company are also located on the property. “The fact that you have all of these things on top of each other in time is really interesting, as an archaeologist, to explore,” explained Lori Collins of the University of South Florida. To read about another recent discovery in Florida, go to “Afterlife Under the Waves.”

Categories: Blog

London Auction House Repatriates Artifacts to Italy

February 14, 2019

LONDON, ENGLAND—CNN reports that a London auction house has handed over eight ancient artifacts to officials at the Italian embassy in London. The items, which lacked verifiable title and provenance, include an Etruscan terracotta mask dated to between the sixth and fifth centuries B.C., a fragment of a marble sarcophagus taken in 1966 from Rome’s Catacombs of St. Callixtus, a second century A.D. Roman marble relief thought to have been taken in 1985 from the Villa Borghese, Greek plates and vases, and a Roman limestone capital. Italy’s culture minister Alberto Bonisoli said Italy’s collaboration with auction houses and other institutions in order to verify the origins of the objects in their collections will help dismantle the traffic in ancient artifacts. For more, go to “Etruscan Code Uncracked.”

Categories: Blog

Ancient Shipyard Discovered in Egypt

February 14, 2019

CAIRO, EGYPT—According to an Ahram Online report, a shipyard that was in use as early as the fourth century B.C. has been uncovered at the Tel Abu Saifi archaeological site in the northern Sinai Peninsula. Equipped with two dry dockyards, the workshop was located on a branch of the Nile near the Roman fortress of Silla. Mostafa Waziri of the Supreme Council of Antiquities said blocks from the shipyard’s limestone building were reused in other structures when the branch of the Nile dried up. Wooden beams, shipwrecks, bronze and iron nails, fish bones, and pottery were also found. To read in-depth about excavations at the ancient Egyptian sacred site of Heliopolis, go to “Egypt's Eternal City.”

Categories: Blog

Model Tracks Spread of Megaliths Across Europe

February 13, 2019

GOTHENBURG, SWEDEN—A new statistical model developed by Bettina Schulz Paulsson of the University of Gothenburg suggests that huge stone structures were first built in what is now northwestern France some 6,800 years ago, and that megalithic construction styles spread across Europe in three waves, according to a Science News report. Paulsson processed 2,410 radiocarbon dates obtained from megalith sites and even older graves and earthen monuments to develop a timeline for when 154 different megalith sites were built. She said the model indicates the first structures, which consisted of two or more standing stones topped with a third stone or a mound of earth, spread from northwest France down the Atlantic coast and into the Mediterranean, perhaps by sailors who traveled long distances and shared their style of building with the people they met along the way. The construction of passage graves, which are now found along the coastlines of Portugal, Spain, Ireland, England, Scotland, France, and Scandinavia, are thought to have been spread by seafaring traders between 6,000 and 5,500 years ago. The final phase of the spread of megalithic structures included the construction of monuments such as Stonehenge with massive boulders some 4,400 years ago, Paulsson said. For more, go to “Quarrying Stonehenge.”

Categories: Blog

Human Remains Discovered Near Egypt’s Meidum Pyramid

February 13, 2019

CAIRO, EGYPT—According to a Live Science report, human remains have been uncovered in a cemetery near the 4,600-year-old Meidum pyramid by a team of archaeologists led by Omar Zaki of Egypt’s Ministry of Antiquities. Initially constructed as a step pyramid by the Pharaoh Huni, who ruled from around 2599 to 2575 B.C., the Meidum pyramid was later given smooth sides by the pharaoh Snefru, who reigned from around 2575 to 2551 B.C. The pyramid has since partially collapsed, but is thought to have once stood more than 300 feet tall. The body is thought to have belonged to a young girl who was about 13 years old when she died, although archaeologists say it is not clear when she was buried. She was placed in the grave without any grave goods. Traces of what may have been a brick wall surrounding the cemetery were also uncovered, along with the remains of what may be two bulls’ heads and three small ceramic vessels. The artifacts may have been funerary offerings, but the archaeologists have not been able to link them to a specific burial. To read in-depth about excavations at the ancient Egyptian sacred site of Heliopolis, go to “Egypt's Eternal City.”

Categories: Blog

Terracotta Fragment in Bulgaria May Depict Roman Emperor

February 13, 2019

VARNA, BULGARIA—The Sofia Globe reports that a piece of a terracotta sculpture dating to the sixth century A.D. has been unearthed at an early Christian monastery site near the Black Sea. The figure is thought to have been part of a mask or bust portraying a Roman emperor, according to Vassil Tenekedzhiev of the Varna Museum of Archaeology. Tenekedzhiev said researchers may attempt to reconstruct the entire face. Foundations of columns, parts of an archway, and fragments of water supply pipes were also uncovered at the site. To read about the discovery of a bronze index finger thought to belong to a sculpture of the Roman emperor Constantine, go to “Hand Picked.”

Categories: Blog

800-Year-Old Shipwreck Porcelain Analyzed

February 13, 2019

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS—Cosmos Magazine reports that a team of researchers from the University of Illinois and The Field Museum have used portable X-ray fluorescence technology to analyze the chemical compositions of 800-year-old porcelain vessels recovered from a shipwreck in the Java Sea in the 1990s. Based upon their style, the more than 100,000 pieces of porcelain were thought to have been made at four specific kiln-complexes in southeastern China. The scientists measured the glazes and pastes on 129 porcelain pieces for levels of 13 elements, including magnesium, phosphorus, lead, silver, and cadmium, and compared the results with data obtained from different types of pottery fragments at various kiln-complex sites. They found that the mix of elements in the glazes were enough to confirm that the pieces had indeed been crafted at the four kiln-complexes the archaeologists had identified based on their initial visual inspections. To read about a molded box found at the site of the same shipwreck, go to “Artifact.”

Categories: Blog

Did Carthage Fight With Captured Roman Warships?

February 12, 2019

TAMPA, FLORIDA—According to a Live Science report, members of the RPM Nautical Foundation recently conducted an underwater survey in the Mediterranean Sea at the site of a naval battle that took place some 2,200 years ago. Historical records indicate the Roman navy destroyed much of the Carthaginian fleet, which had been carrying supplies to its armies in Sicily, on March 10, 241 B.C. The researchers recovered helmets, pottery, and six bronze rams. Research team member William Murray of the University of South Florida thinks the Carthaginians may have been fighting with Roman ships captured during a previous battle, since most of the rams recovered from the sea floor over the course of the survey project have been Roman. “You would expect that the Carthaginians, who lost the battle, would have suffered the most casualties,” he explained. The helmets may have belonged to mercenaries from Gaul and Iberia hired to man the Carthaginian fleet, he added. The team members also recovered amphorae scattered around the shipwrecks. “It’s as if they were jettisoned out into the sea, and they separated one from another and then sank to the seafloor,” Murray said. Throwing the containers overboard may have been an attempt by the Carthaginians to make the ships lighter and faster, he said. To read more about Rome's mastery of the Mediterranean, go to "Rome's Imperial Port." 

Categories: Blog

Smuggled Ancient Egyptian Statue Recovered

February 12, 2019

AMSTERDAM, THE NETHERLANDS—Ahram Online reports that an ancient limestone statue confiscated by Dutch police has been handed over to the Egyptian embassy in Amsterdam. Shaaban Abdel Gawad of the Antiquities Repatriation Department of the Ministry of Antiquities said the statue was noticed by Egyptian authorities when it was put on display in Holland last year. Hieroglyphs carved on the sculpture identify it as an official named Nekaw-Ptah, who is shown standing and wearing a short wig. The inscription also indicates that Nekaw-Ptah lived during the First Intermediate Period, which spanned about 125 years beginning at the end of the Old Kingdom period, around 2181 B.C. Egyptian officials say the statue was looted from the Saqqara necropolis in the 1990s. To read in-depth about recent excavations in Egypt, go to "Egypt's Eternal City."  

Categories: Blog

Did Bone Marrow Fuel Hominin Brain Development?

February 12, 2019

NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT—According to a report in Cosmos Magazine, Jessica Thompson of Yale University and her colleagues suggest that brain growth in early hominins may have been fueled by nutrient-rich, fatty bone marrow scavenged from large-animal carcasses left behind by other predators. These early human ancestors living some four million years ago would have been able to access the marrow by smashing the bones with rocks, Thompson explains. She thinks once hominins developed a taste for marrow, they may have craved it and other fatty foods. In this scenario, the craving for more calories and fat could have driven hominins to develop tools and techniques to hunt large animals. Thompson suggests that paleoanthropologists look for evidence of bone-smashing behavior by our earliest ancestors. To read more about the evolution of early human ancestors, go to "No Changeups on the Savannah." 

Categories: Blog

Shell Jewelry Manufacturing Site Excavated in India

February 12, 2019

AHMEDABAD, INDIA—The Times of India reports that traces of the industrial production of conch shell bangles and beads have been unearthed in western India’s state of Gujarat. Abhijit Ambekar of the Archaeological Survey of India and his colleagues suggest people living in the region recovered Turbinella pyrum shells from the Gulf of Kutch and fashioned them into intricately carved bangles and beads, inlays, and rings as early as the first or second century A.D. The industry is thought to have peaked in the fifth century, and continued into the medieval period. The finished jewelry is thought to have been traded to the east and the south, where similar bangles have been found. The excavation also recovered a stone tablet engraved with a conch motif dating to about the fifth century A.D. To read about another recent discovery, go to "India's Anonymous Artists." 

Categories: Blog

Possible Source of Ancient Earthquake Examined

February 9, 2019

ROME, ITALY—According to a Nature report, Paolo Galli of Italy’s Department of Civil Protection led a team of researchers who searched the 18-mile-long Mount Vettore fault in the central Apennine Mountains for evidence of past earthquakes. They found soil disturbances suggesting that the fault generated six earthquakes measuring greater than magnitude 6.5 over the past 9,000 years. One of those events may have been an earthquake recorded by historians in A.D. 443, which damaged the Colosseum and other buildings in Rome. The most recent earthquakes caused by the fault occurred in 2016, killing some 300 people. To read about a theory of how an earthquake may have affected ancient Chinese history, go to “Seismic Shift.”

Categories: Blog

Human Remains Unearthed Near Fort William Henry

February 9, 2019

LAKE GEORGE, NEW YORK—WNYT.com reports that scattered human remains were uncovered at a construction site in the Adirondacks, near Fort William Henry, which was built by the British in 1755, during the French and Indian War. In 1757, the French laid siege to and destroyed the fort, which was situated on the southern edge of Lake George. Archaeologist David Starbuck of Plymouth State University said the bones are those of a European-American. “I suspect there could easily be hundreds of unmarked graves in this town,” Starbuck said. For more on archaeology in the area, go to “Lake George's Unfinished Fort.”

Categories: Blog

Turquoise Mines Excavated in Northern China

February 9, 2019

URUMQI, CHINA—Xinhua reports that a cluster of turquoise mining sites covering an area of about three square miles has been studied in northwest China, close to the route of the ancient Silk Road. Archaeologists from the Xinjiang Cultural Relics and Archaeology Institute, Northwest University in Xi’an City, Shaanxi Provincial Archaeology Institute, and Beijing Science and Technology University have uncovered industrial areas that were used for processing tools and separating minerals, and separate living areas. Pottery, bronze, stone, and bone artifacts have been found, in addition to textiles and animal products. Analysis of the artifacts indicates the mine was in use during the Spring and Autumn Period, from around 770 to 475 B.C., and the Warring States Period, from around 475 to 221 B.C. To read about another discovery in China, go to “Tomb Couture.”

Categories: Blog

Nabatean Carvings Returned to Jordan

February 8, 2019

OXFORD, ENGLAND—According to a report in The Art Newspaper, three carvings removed from a Nabatean temple at the site of Khirbet et-Tannur have been returned to Jordan. The carvings had been in the collection of a Spanish diplomat who served in Jerusalem and Amman, and were acquired by an art dealer sometime after the diplomat’s death in 2016. Judith McKenzie of the University of Oxford, who has led an international study of the archaeologist Nelson Glueck’s records of the excavation of Khirbet et-Tannur in the early twentieth century, confirmed the identification of the artifacts and arranged for their repatriation. “Securing their return was a collaborative effort involving myself, the art dealer, and various authorities in Spain and Jordan,” she explained. In addition, McKenzie’s study of pottery and inscriptions at Khirbet et-Tannur could assist archaeologists with the dating of the temples and tombs at the Nabatean site of Petra, located about 40 miles to the south. For more, go to “Mystery Buildings at Petra.”

Categories: Blog

Pages

Dig Deeper

Email the AIA Facebook Instagram YouTube Twitter
Subscribe to the AIA e-Update

Sign Up!