Subscribe to Archaeology News feed
Updated: 45 min 2 sec ago

World War II-Era Secret Road Found in Papua New Guinea

July 22, 2017

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA—According to a report in The Herald Sun, a team of Australian researchers is exploring an obscure road built by the Japanese army during World War II in Papua New Guinea. Archaeologist Matthew Kelly of Extent Heritage and his colleagues were investigating the battlefield of Etoa, which is located along the Kokoda Track—a 30-mile-long footpath across rugged mountain terrain from Owers Corner in Central Province to the village of Kokoda—when they found the hidden supply road. It ran parallel to the Kokoda Track, but was wider and could have been used by the Japanese army to move supplies on horseback while the Australians and Japanese fought along the Kokoda Track from July to November, 1942. “It would have changed things,” Kelly said of the secret road. “This one would have been unknown to Australian intelligence. They could strafe the Kokoda Track but they couldn’t see the Japanese moving back and forth along this one.” To read more, go to "The Archaeology of WWII."

Categories: Blog

4,000-Year-Old Tombs Discovered in Romania

July 22, 2017

CÂRLOMĂNEŞTI, ROMANIA—Romania Insider reports that nine Bronze Age tombs have been found in eastern Romania by researchers from the Buzău County Museums. Some of the tombs have been damaged by farming, but the tombs located deeper underground were found intact. “Each tomb usually has a minimum of three jugs,” said Mihai Constantinescu of the Anthropology Institute of the Bucharest Academy. One of the vessels, shaped like a dove, contained fragments of bone from the feet of pigs. Constantinescu thinks they may have been used as toys. Hair ornaments, bracelets, bronze collars, and spindles were also recovered. To read more about archaeology in Bulgaria, go to "Thracian Treasure Chest."

Categories: Blog

Yorkshire Yields a Glimpse of Britain’s 19th-Century Industry

July 21, 2017

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND—BBC News reports that excavations have recently been conducted at two early nineteenth-century steel-making sites in Yorkshire. The region was well suited to industry because iron, coal, and water power were readily available. The excavation at Hollis Croft uncovered an early cementation furnace, which was used to convert iron into blister steel. At the Titanic Works, crucible furnaces, which were developed in Sheffield, have been well preserved in three cellars. “You can see the driving force for Britain’s industrial revolution,” said archaeologist Milica Rajic of Wessex Archaeology. To read more about the archaeology of this period in English history, go to "Haunt of the Resurrection Man."

Categories: Blog

Medieval Graffiti Found in Egypt

July 21, 2017

CAIRO, EGYPT—Graffiti dating to the medieval period was discovered engraved on the walls of a cave in southeastern Egypt, according to a report in Ahram Online. Mohamed Abdellatif of Egypt’s Ministry of Antiquities said the cave was used as a rest stop by travelers passing through what is known as the Gold Triangle area, marked by the cities of Safaga and Quesseir at the base, and the city of Qena at the top. Some of the carvings have been damaged by erosion, but Mohamed Tuni of the Red Sea Governorate’s Islamic and Coptic Antiquities Department said two of the texts have been read. The first says “There is no God except Allah,” and the second reads, “God has returned the poor slave Youssef Bin Hatem Al-Shati to his family in 755 of Hegira. May God have mercy on him and his parents and all the Muslims. Amen.” The ministry may restore the graffiti and put the cave on the official list of protected heritage sites. To read about religious medieval graffiti in England, go to "Writing on the Church Wall."

Categories: Blog

Ancient Reservoir Unearthed in Israel

July 21, 2017

ROSH HA-AYIN, ISRAEL—According to a report in the Times of Israel, a 2,700-year-old reservoir has been unearthed in central Israel. The reservoir measures more than 60 feet long and 12 feet deep, and was found cut into the rock under a large building. Its walls had been decorated with engraved images of human figures, crosses, and vegetation. Archaeologist Gilad Itach of the Israel Antiquities Authority said the reservoir would have been filled with rain water during the winter rainy season. Itach thinks the large structure and its water system may have been an administrative center for the surrounding farmsteads. To read more about archaeology in the region, go to "Expanding the Story."

Categories: Blog

Volcanic Eruption Could Threaten Tanzania’s Hominin Trackways

July 20, 2017

 

ARUSHA, TANZANIA—Two sets of hominin footprints could be lost if the Ol Doinyo Lengai volcano erupts, according to a report in New Scientist. Scientists studying tremors in East Africa’s Rift Valley say the volcano, which has a widening crack on its west side, could erupt at any time. A set of 400 hominin prints dating back 19,000 years is located just ten miles away from the Ol Doinyo Lengai volcano at Engare Sero. The 3.7-million-year-old Laetoli hominin footprints are located a safer 70 miles away. Both sets of prints have been recorded with 3-D scans, but the prints are “not like fossilized bones that we can dig up and walk away with,” explained Kevin Hatala of Chatham Univeristy. 

For more on ancient footprints, go to “Proof in the Prints.”

Categories: Blog

Fishing Weir in Southern England Dated to Ninth Century A.D.

July 20, 2017

HAMPSHIRE, ENGLAND—BBC News reports that a 500-foot-long timber fishing trap found in a tidal estuary on the southern coast of England has been radiocarbon dated to the eighth or ninth centuries. At low tide in the salt marsh, fish trapped in the weir would have been easy to catch by hand or with a net. The discovery will help scientists map changes to the shoreline over the past 1,000 years. “It has highlighted the level of erosion in Southampton Water over the last few decades,” said marine archaeologist John Cooper of the University of Exeter. “There are factors like sea level rise and dredging carried out but it shows how dynamic coastal change is.” To read about the Anglo-Saxon period in southern England, go to "The Kings of Kent."

Categories: Blog

Neolithic Rock Art Appears at the Ness of Brogdar

July 20, 2017

ORKNEY, SCOTLAND—Incised “butterfly motifs” appeared in a wall at the Neolithic site of the Ness of Brogdar as sunlight hit the stone blocks at a certain angle, according to a report in BBC News. The markings are so faint they have not yet been caught in a photograph. Antonia Thomas of the University of the Highlands and Islands said the images may have appeared to move as the sunlight traveled over them during the day. The site, located near the standing stones known as the Ring of Brodgar, consists of Neolithic ritual and domestic buildings. Other stones will be examined to see if incised marks were overlooked. To read in-depth about the site, go to "Neolithic Europe's Remote Heart."

Categories: Blog

First Occupation of Australia Pushed Back 10,000 Years

July 20, 2017

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON—According to a report in The Sydney Morning Herald, humans first traveled to Australia at least 65,000 years ago, or about 10,000 years earlier than previously thought. An international team of scientists, including Ben Marwick of the University of Washington and Chris Clarkson of the University of Queensland, excavated Madjedbebe, an ancient campsite located beneath a sandstone rock shelter in Kakadu National Park in the Northern Territory. They found perfectly preserved stone axes with polished and sharpened edges up against the back wall of the shelter. “There was one on the surface, another further down that we dated at 10,000 years,” Clarkson said. “Then there were quite a few further down still which [we] were able to date at 35,000 to 40,000 years, and finally one at 65,000 years, surrounded by a whole bunch of stone flakes.” The layers were dated with single-grain optically-stimulated luminescence dating techniques. The team also recovered seed-grinding tools, a midden of sea shells and animal bones, and a large amount of ground ochre. The new dates also suggest that humans and megafauna such as the Diprotodon shared the environment for some 20,000 years. It had been thought that the arrival of humans in Australia triggered the extinction of the continent’s megafauna. To watch a video about Australian rock art, go to "The Rock Art of Djulirri." 

 

Categories: Blog

Roman Sarcophagus Uncovered in London

July 19, 2017

LONDON, ENGLAND—BBC News reports that a 1,600-year-old Roman sarcophagus with an opened lid was unearthed at a construction site on Swan Street in central London. An infant’s bones and a broken bracelet were found in the soil near the sarcophagus. Archaeologists think the coffin was opened in the eighteenth century, but they are not sure if the infant’s remains were removed at that time. “We always knew this site had the potential for a Roman cemetery, but we never knew there would be a sarcophagus,” said Gillian King of Southwark Council. The sarcophagus will be taken to the Museum of London and the bones will be analyzed. To read more about the archaeology the city's Roman past, go to "London's Earliest Writing."

Categories: Blog

Study of Dog Domestication Continues

July 19, 2017

STONY BROOK, NEW YORK—A new study of the dog genome suggests the animals were domesticated from wolves just once, according to a report in Science News. Last year, another study indicated that dogs had been domesticated separately in Europe and in East Asia. An international team of scientists led by evolutionary geneticist Krishna R. Veeramah of Stony Brook University analyzed DNA obtained from the remains of two ancient dogs. The first dog lived some 7,000 years ago. Its remains were recovered in Herxheim, Germany. The second dog, whose remains were recovered from Germany’s Cherry Tree Cave, lived about 4,700 years ago. The team also used the DNA data of a 4,800-year-old dog from Newgrange, Ireland. The researchers suggests that dogs were domesticated between 20,000 and 40,000 years ago, perhaps in Asia, and then split into genetically distinct eastern and western groups between 17,000 and 24,000 years ago. The study also reveals that the two ancient dogs unearthed in Germany had the same genes for digesting starches as wolves do. It had been suggested that early dogs may have been better able to digest starch, and therefore eat the food grown by early farmers, in contrast to their wild counterparts. To read in-depth about the archaeology of dogs, go to "More Than Man's Best Friend."

Categories: Blog

French and Indian War Cannonball Uncovered in Quebec

July 18, 2017

MONTRÉAL, CANADA—A cannonball fired in 1759 by the British during the Battle of the Plains of Abraham was unearthed by construction workers in Old Québec. CBC News reports that archaeologist Serge Rouleau alerted the authorities after he realized the 200-pound ball still contained a charge of gunpowder. “With time, humidity got into its interior and reduced its potential for exploding, but there’s still a danger,” said Master Warrant Officer Sylvain Trudel. Such large cannonballs were used to set fire to buildings. This ball is thought to have been fired at Quebec City from Lévis, which is located on the opposite side of the St. Lawrence River. If Trudel’s team can neutralize the weapon without destroying it, it will be preserved and sent to a museum. To read about a fort built in New York during the French and Indian War, go to "Off the Grid: Roger's Island, New York."

Categories: Blog

Roman Coin Unearthed on Orkney Island

July 18, 2017

ORKNEY, SCOTLAND—A Roman coin dating to the fourth century A.D. has been found in a small roundhouse at the Knowe of Swandro on the island of Rousay, according to a report in BBC News. “The bust on the coin is clearly visible although much of the lettering isn’t at present clear,” said Steve Dockerill, co-director of the project. “The reverse contains a standing figure, possibly representing the emperor with what might be an image of Victory at the side.” The coin is one of just seven Roman coins to have been found on the Orkney Islands. To read in-depth about Roman archaeology in Britain, go to "The Wall at the End of the Empire."

Categories: Blog

Archaeologists Will Study the International Space Station

July 18, 2017

ORANGE, CALIFORNIA—Space.com reports that archaeologists Justin Walsh of Chapman University and Alice Gorman of Flinders University will study astronaut culture aboard the International Space Station (ISS), which has been continuously occupied by rotating crews of scientists since 2000. Walsh and Gorman will use databases storing information on all of the objects sent to the ISS, and photographs taken on board, to create a 4-D digital model of the vessel. They will then use the virtual ISS to try to recreate patterns of life in space. The researchers think this archaeological approach could help space agency managers improve the design of the vessel’s furnishings and how the international team of astronauts shares them. The ISS is scheduled to be decommissioned in 2024. To read an interview with Alice Gorman, go to "Saving Space Junk."

Categories: Blog

Trade Silver Unearthed at Colonial Fort in Michigan

July 15, 2017

MACKINAW CITY, MICHIGAN—Michigan Live reports that a 250-year-old piece of trade silver was discovered at the site of a fur-trader’s home in Colonial Michilimackinac, which is located on an island in the straits connecting Lake Huron and Lake Michigan. The triangle-shaped piece of silver has a small hole in one corner, so it may have been worn as a pendant or an earring. Lynn Evans, curator of archaeology at Mackinac State Historic Parks, said that only one other piece of British trade silver has been recovered at Fort Michilimackinac to date. To read about the nautical archaeology of Lake Huron, go to "Shipwreck Alley."

Categories: Blog

Pictish Man’s Face Reconstructed

July 15, 2017

GLASGOW, SCOTLAND—According to a report in The Daily Record, the face of a Pictish man, whose remains were discovered in a cist burial in Highland Perthshire in the 1980s, has been recreated by forensic artist Hayley Fisher and Bob Will of GUARD Archaeology. The man is thought to have lived between A.D. 340 and 615, and to have died in his 40s. Additional study of the skeletal remains could reveal information on his diet and where he lived. The scientists will also try to recover a DNA sample. To read about another facial reconstruction, go to "Neolithic Facetime."

Categories: Blog

The Search for an Ornamental Garden in Colonial Williamsburg

July 14, 2017

WILLIAMSBURG, VIRGINIA—The Daily Press reports that Colonial Williamsburg and the College of William and Mary are conducting a joint excavation in the unusual, terraced backyard of the Robert Carter House, which is located off the outdoor living history museum's Palace Green. Built in the early eighteenth century for his daughter by Robert “King” Carter, the colonial governor and the wealthiest man in Virginia, the property’s outbuildings are located to the sides of the main two-story building, rather than directly behind it. Additionally, the house's dining room is located in the rear— when in most houses in Williamsburg, the dining room was located in the front— prompting speculation about the importance of the house's back yard. “We think there was an ornamental garden here, but we want to know for sure,” explained teaching assistant Alexis Ohman. The team, led by Colonial Williamsburg archaeologist Mark Kostro, is looking for ephemeral garden features under the landfill dumped on the site in the early twentieth century. So far, the excavators have found a long, dark stain in the soil that could be evidence of a planting bed, and a six-foot stretch of crumbled white shell that may have been a path. To read about archaeology at nearby Jamestown, go to "Colonial Cannibalism."

Categories: Blog

5,600-Year-Old Burial Mound Found in England

July 14, 2017

WILTSHIRE, ENGLAND—According to report in Live Science, a Neolithic burial mound was spotted in a farmer’s field located halfway between the Neolithic stone monuments of Avebury and Stonehenge with aerial photographs. The top soil has been removed from what is now known as the Cat’s Brain site to reveal what looks like a central building that may have been covered by a mound, and long barrow ditches. At other long barrow sites, archaeologists have found that some of the dead would have been buried in the ditches. A few would have been left on platforms until their bones had been picked clean by birds. The skeletons were then placed in structures that looked like houses, sometimes with cow skulls. “These are the very first people to have domestic cows, and they seem quite an important species to them,” said Jim Leary of the University of Reading. The discovery offers scientists a rare opportunity to investigate a long barrow site with modern archaeological techniques. To read in-depth about Neolithic Britain, go to "Neolithic Europe's Remote Heart."

Categories: Blog

Stone Tombs Studied in Jordan’s Desolate Desert

July 14, 2017

LEIDEN, THE NETHERLANDS—Live Science reports that hundreds of looted tombs marked by cairns and taller stone towers, located on the high plateaus and the summits of basalt hills in Jordan’s Jebel Qurma desert, are being surveyed by a team led by Peter Akkermans and Merel Brüning of Leiden University. Some of the stones used to construct the tower tombs, which can stand five feet tall and measure 16 feet in diameter, weigh an estimated 660 pounds. The oldest structures date back 8,000 years. The people buried in the tombs are thought to have lived nearby in valleys and on lower ground. Evidence of human occupation disappears for the period beginning about 4,000 years ago, an absence that lasted for about 1,000 years. Akkermans said it may be that the members of the Jebel Qurma Archaeological Landscape Project just haven’t found the remains of the people and their settlements for that time frame, or the people may have left the area and returned 1,000 years later, due to conditions in the region. “Research into local environmental and climatic conditions is certainly one of my aims for further research in the desert of Jebel Qurma,” Akkermans said. To read more about archaeology in the region, go to "Neolithic Face Time."

Categories: Blog

Archaeologists Return to Cornwall’s Tintagel Castle

July 13, 2017

CORNWALL, ENGLAND—In the fifth and sixth centuries, the Cornish kings who lived at Tintagel Castle feasted on oysters, cod, beef, pork, and lamb served on red slipware bowls imported from Turkey, and drank fine wine imported from southern Turkey or Cyprus in glass goblets imported from Spain, according to a report in The Guardian. Recent excavations, conducted by the Cornwall Archaeological Unit, also uncovered structures with stone walls and slate floors and steps. “All indications to date could suggest that they are residential buildings perhaps lived in by important members of the community that lived and traded at Tintagel over 800 years ago,” said project director Jacky Nowakowski. To read about the discovery of a royal Anglo-Saxon feasting hall dating to this period, go to "The Kings of Kent."

Categories: Blog

Pages

Dig Deeper

Email the AIA
Subscribe to the AIA e-Update

Sign Up!