Fieldnotes: Digital Resources

A permanent list of digital resources in archaeology and related fields.

See also: Directory of Graduate Programs in the United States and Canada

Labraunda is the home of the Sanctuary of Zeus Labraundos and is located 14 km from the modern town of Milas, in southwestern Turkey.
The Arthur and Janet C. Ross Library of the American Academy in Rome contains over 135,000 volumes in the fields of of classical studies and the history of art and architecture. Especially strong are the collections in ancient Mediterranean archaeology and art, Greek and Latin literature, ancient topography (including the history of the city of Rome), ancient religions, and related fields such as epigraphy, numismatics and papyrology. There is a good working collection in the history of art and architecture, especially Italian. The rare book collection comprises chiefly 16th-18th century imprints in classical studies, archaeology, art and architecture, including sizeable collections of Roman guidebooks and early art treatises. The Library also houses small but noteworthy collections in contemporary art and architecture, landscape architecture, Italian history and literature, American literature, historical travel books and music. The Library acquires ca. 2,000 volumes per year and subscribes to approximately 600 current periodicals. Preference is given to scholarly publications in the core subjects listed above. A special priority is given to publications from the United States, in the conviction that the Academy has a responsibility to represent the best of American scholarship to Rome's multinational community.
Limyra ist eine Stadt des lykischen Bundes, die neben den üblichen Ruinen - Theater, Agora, Stadtmauer, byzantinische Kirche - vor allem mehrere Nekropolen aufzuweisen hat, von denen vor allem die westliche wirklich bemerkenswert ist. Der komplette Berghang ist übersät mit Felsgräbern, die auch bestens ausgestattet sein sollen. Da der Hang aber recht steil ist und auf Grund seiner Lage praktisch den ganzen Tag in der prallen Sonne liegt und außer den Grabkammern keinerlei schattige Stellen aufzuweisen hat, haben wir es trotz zweier Besuche (1988 und 2002) nicht weiter als bis zu den ersten Gräbern geschafft. Auf der Höhe des Berges liegt noch eine Akropolis mit den Grundmauern eines Heroons, über die ich mir aber aus dem gleichen Grund kein Urteil erlauben kann. Der Aufstieg soll laut Reiseführer ohne Pause ca. 45 Minuten beanspruchen
Discussion of the archaeological ethics surrounding the collecting of antiquities. A trove of information, run by David Gill (Swansea).
This program involves a two-month study period at Ca' Foscari University in Venice. This interdisciplinary program combines maritime and nautical archaeology with the economic history of maritime trade. Students enrolled in the program will have the opportunity to take part in one of the underwater excavations of Ca' Foscari university.
An excavation of Magnesia carried out by Ankara University. 
The Manar al-Athar open-access photo-archive http://www.manar-al-athar.ox.ac.uk (based at the University of Oxford) aims to provide high resolution, searchable images, freely-downloadable for teaching, research, heritage projects, and publication. It covers buildings and art in the areas of the former Roman empire which later came under Islamic rule (e.g. Syro-Palestine/the Levant, Arabia, Egypt, and North Africa), from ca. 300 BC to the present, but especially Roman, late antique, and early Islamic art, architecture, and sacred sites. Many of the monuments are now inaccessible to the West making this archive an important long-term resource for research, with downloadable high resolution images which are not watermarked. The records of monuments which are damaged or destroyed will also play a vital role in future restoration. Low resolution copies of these photographs for Powerpoint make them readily suitable for classroom use and demonstrating the shared heritage of the regions covered and the West. The images download with the caption, etc. and credit line in the metadata. The archive has over 17,000 images already online, as of September 2015. Material is labelled in both English and Arabic to facilitate regional use, with the main instructions also available in some other languages.  
This program in museum administration provides opportunities for research and professional training in the history and preservation of cultural artifacts.
The Maya Research Program is a U.S.-based non-profit organization (501C3) that sponsors archaeological and ethnographic research in Middle America. Each summer since 1992, we have sponsored archaeological fieldwork at the ancient Maya site of Blue Creek in northwestern Belize and ethnographic research in the village of Yaxunah, Mexico. The Maya Research Program is affiliated with the University of Texas at Tyler. A key MRP goal is to encourage the participation of students and volunteers -- anyone who wants to experience the real world of archaeological or anthropological research and understand how we learn about other cultures may join us. We see this as a critical educational component of MRP's work, and it helps us accomplish our research goals as well! The ages of our participants range from 18 to over 80. So many of our participants return year after year that MRP has become an extended family. About half of our participants are university students under 30 years old and the other half are professionals and retirees. While the majority of participants come from the United States and Canada, we have students from Australian, European, Latin American, and Japanese institutions as well. For students, academic credit can usually be arranged. While many students go on to careers in other fields, many go on to become successful graduate students in archaeology or a related field and return to focus on MRP projects for their theses and dissertations.
The Maya Research Program is a U.S.-based non-profit organization (501C3) that sponsors archaeological and ethnographic research in Middle America. Each summer since 1992, we have sponsored archaeological fieldwork at the ancient Maya site of Blue Creek in northwestern Belize and ethnographic research in the village of Yaxunah, Mexico. The Maya Research Program is affiliated with the University of Texas at Tyler. A key MRP goal is to encourage the participation of students and volunteers -- anyone who wants to experience the real world of archaeological or anthropological research and understand how we learn about other cultures may join us. We see this as a critical educational component of MRP's work, and it helps us accomplish our research goals as well! The ages of our participants range from 18 to over 80. So many of our participants return year after year that MRP has become an extended family. About half of our participants are university students under 30 years old and the other half are professionals and retirees. While the majority of participants come from the United States and Canada, we have students from Australian, European, Latin American, and Japanese institutions as well. For students, academic credit can usually be arranged. While many students go on to careers in other fields, many go on to become successful graduate students in archaeology or a related field and return to focus on MRP projects for their theses and dissertations.

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