Research Institutes and Working Groups

The mission of the American Academy in Rome, founded in 1894, is to foster the pursuit of advanced research and independent study in the fine arts and humanities.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The ANS is the preeminent national institution advancing the study and appreciation of coins, medals and related objects of all cultures as historical and artistic documents. It maintains the foremost numismatic collection and library, and supports scholarly research and publications, and sponsors educational and interpretive programs for diverse audiences.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The American Research Institute in Turkey (ARIT) is a non-profit educational institution dedicated to promoting North American and Turkish research and exchanges related to Turkey in all fields of the humanities and social sciences. ARIT provides support for these scholarly endeavors by maintaining research centers in Istanbul and Ankara, and by administering programs of fellowships to support research in Turkey at doctoral and advanced research levels. The range of research encompassed by American research in Turkey reflects the cultural richness of Turkey itself. From the Old Stone Age to the present, Turkey presents numerous opportunities for research in archaeology, architecture and art history, historical, textual, and archival studies, linguistics, literature, musicology, religion, anthropology, political science, sociology, and interdisciplinary studies.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The American Research Institute of the South Caucasus (ARISC), a non-profit American Overseas Research Center,  encourages and supports scholarly study of the South Caucasus states (Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia) across all disciplines of the Humanities, Sciences, and Social Sciences, including archaeological and cultural heritage projects.   ARISC promotes and encourages American research in the region and fosters intellectual inquiry across boundaries within the South Caucasus as well as between the South Caucasus and its neighbors. ARISC supports conferences, fellowships, publications, and teaching resources for use both in the United States and in the host countries where the Institute is located, and encourages other forms of cooperation.  ARISC  has local representatives in Yerevan, Baku and Tbilisi, who serve to facilitate research and nurture scholarly ties between institutions and individuals.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

Founded in 1881, The American School of Classical Studies provides graduate students and scholars from affiliated North American college and universities a base for the advanced study of all aspects of Greek culture, from antiquity to the present day. It also contributes considerably to the dissemination of information about Greek history and archaeology to the Greek public, as well as to the international and Greek scholarly communities.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The mission of the Archaeological Research Facility (ARF) is to encourage and carry out archaeological field and laboratory research conducted by U.C. Berkeley archaeologists and related specialists. As a field of research, archaeology is inherently interdisciplinary and collaborative; not only are there intimate research collaborations among natural scientists, social scientists and/or humanities scholars, but archaeology is practiced by scholars who expectedly hold faculty and/or research positions in a variety of departments, ranging from Classics to Earth and Planetary Science.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

An independent learned society, the Archaeological Society assists the Greek State in its work of protecting, improving and studying Greek antiquities. Whenever necessary, it undertakes the management and execution of large projects: this has happened with the excavations in Macedonia and Thrace in recent years and with the large-scale restoration projects in the past. An important part of the Society's work is its publishing. It brings out three annual titles: Praktika tes Archaiologikes Hetairias (Proceedings of the Archaeological Society), since 1837, containing detailed reports on the excavations and researches carried out in all parts of Greece; Archaiologike Ephemeris (since 1837), containing papers on subjects to do with Greek antiquities, including excavation reports; and Ergon tes Archaiologikes Hetairias (The Work of the Archaeological Society), since 1955, published every May, with brief reports on its excavations.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The British School at Athens is an educational charity founded in 1886. It now forms part of the British Academy's network of Sponsored Institutes and Societies (BASIS) which sustains and supports British research overseas. The School exists to promote research of international excellence in all disciplines pertaining to Greek lands, from fine art to archaeometry and in all periods to modern times.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The BSR is a centre for research on the archaeology, history, and culture of Italy, and for contemporary art and architecture. It serves the needs of scholars and fine artists from the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth. The BSR is one of the research institutes sponsored by the British Academy, and is one of a large group of international academies in Rome.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, located in the East Building at the National Gallery of Art, is a research institute that fosters study of the production, use, and cultural meaning of art, artifacts, architecture, and urbanism, from prehistoric times to the present. Founded in 1979, the Center encourages a variety of approaches by historians, critics, and theorists of art, as well as by scholars in related disciplines of the humanities and social sciences.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The Center for Ancient Studies at the University of Pennsylvania strives to bring together students and faculty, as well as members of the greater Philadelphia community, who share a passion for the ancient world, through the promotion and support of events pertaining to pre-modern societies.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The newly formed Center for Comparative Archaeology at the University of Pittsburgh aims to help accomplish that goal by fostering the broad comparative study of social change in trajectories of such time depth that their earlier periods, at least, are knowable only through archaeological research.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The Columbia Center for Archaeology fosters links between all faculty and students concerned with the study of the past, materiality, and the relationship between the past and the present. We are located on the 9th floor of Schermerhorn Extension, where you will find computer facilities, the CCA lab, lecture/seminar room, faculty offices, and information noticeboards. The Center holds regular events, such as conferences, guest lectures and research seminars, student presentations, and informal social gatherings. We also coordinate information on Columbia archaeology courses, fieldwork opportunities and the New York Archaeological Consortium.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA is a premier research organization dedicated to the creation, dissemination, and conservation of archaeological knowledge and heritage. The Cotsen Institute is home to both the Interdepartmental Archaeology Program and the UCLA/Getty Program in Archaeological and Ethnographic Conservation. It provides a forum for innovative faculty research, graduate education, and public programs at UCLA in an effort to positively impact the academic, local and global communities. The Cotsen Institute is at the forefront of archaeological research, education, conservation and publication and is an active contributor to interdisciplinary research at UCLA.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The members of the Council of American Overseas Research Centers serve as a base for virtually every American scholar undertaking research in the host countries. They have bases in Afghanistan, Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia, Bangladesh, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Cyprus, Egypt, Greece, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Italy, Jordan, Mexico, Mongolia, Nepal, Pakistan, Palestine, Senegal, Sri Lanka, Turkey, and Yemen.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

Affiliated with the American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR) and the Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC), CAARI offers world-class resources through our comprehensive library of materials relating to Cyprus and adjacent geographic regions. Visiting students and scholars can find living quarters as well as technical and logistical support facilities. The Center hosts lectures, seminars and symposia for professional and lay audiences. We also offer fellowship opportunities for students and established senior scholars. The mission of CAARI is to promote studies of Cypriot archaeology and related humanistic disciplines. Historically, Cyprus has been a meeting place and crossroad of civilizations. The Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute serves a similar role today.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The Rome Department of the German Archeological Institute developed out of the Instituto di Corrispondenza Archeologica founded in 1829. The oldest European research institution, the Rome Department became a public institution supported by the Prussian state in 1871. Today the library's holdings are of international significance, a result of the Institute's long history and the many generous private donations it has received. Its holdings include one of the largest specialized photo collections in Italy, an extensive reference collection for academic research, including the well-established archive and the archeological bibliography (Realkatalog) that allows for the search of relevant publications. In particular, the collection focuses on Italian and North African Archeology from the pre-historical to the medieval periods.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The INSTAP Study Center for East Crete is a unique facility for archaeological research, especially in the area of Aegean Prehistory. The Center is committed to stimulating and facilitating publication in the broader field of Cretan studies, with a focus on archaeology and ethnology. The Center provides storage space for artifacts from American and Greek-American excavations in eastern Crete and offers services for the primary study of excavated material to both member projects and individual scholars. On a broader level, the Center also functions as a base of operations for individuals engaged in a wide range of Cretan research topics unrelated to the member projects. The numerous facilities and services at the Center are available to both individuals and projects. For information about availability, contact Thomas M. Brogan, Director of the INSTAP Study Center for East Crete.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The Institute for Mediterranean Studies (IMS) based in Rethymno, Crete, was founded in 1985 and belongs to the research units of the Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas (FORTH). The IMS is the only FORTH centre which deals with the human and social sciences. The other Institutes based at Heraklion, Patras and Ioannina, cover the fields of computer science and the natural and biomedical sciences.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

ISAW is a center for advanced scholarly research and graduate education, which aims to encourage particularly the study of the economic, religious, political and cultural connections between ancient civilizations. It offers both doctoral and postdoctoral programs, with the aim of training a new generation of scholars who will enter the global academic community and become intellectual leaders. In an effort to embrace a truly inclusive geographical scope while maintaining continuity and coherence, the Institute focuses on the shared and overlapping periods in the development of cultures and civilizations around the Mediterranean basin, and across central Asia to the Pacific Ocean. The approaches of anthropology, archaeology, geography, geology, history, economics, sociology, art history, and the history of science and technology are as integral to the enterprise as the study of texts, philosophy, and the analysis of artifacts. The Institute's Director and permanent faculty determine particular directions of research, but both historical connections and patterns, as well as socially illuminating comparisons, will always be central to its mission.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The Institute of Classical Archaeology (ICA) carries out multi-disciplinary archaeological research, conservation, and cultural resource management projects in the territory of ancient Greek colonies in southern Italy and on the Black Sea coast of Ukraine. ICA was established as a research unit in the College of Liberal Arts at the University of Texas, Austin, in 1974. Over the past 30 years, with major support from public and private sources, ICA has developed long-term projects to explore the agricultural hinterlands of ancient Metapontum and Croton in Italy and the territory and urban area of ancient Chersonesos in Crimea, Ukraine. Principal collaborators include the Archaeological Superintendencies of Calabria and Basilicata and the National Preserve of Tauric Chersonesos at Sevastopol. ICA's publications and research have brought it international recognition as a leader in the study of rural populations in the Greek and Roman world.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World is dedicated to the academic study and public promotion of the archaeology and art of the ancient Mediterranean, Egypt, and Western Asia (the latter broadly construed as extending from Anatolia and the Levant to the Caucasus, and including the territories of the ancient Near East); our principal research interests lie in the complex societies of the pre-modern era. Although the core efforts of the Joukowsky Institute are archaeological in nature and are located within this broadly defined zone, close ties with all individuals interested in the ancient world, and with archaeologists of all parts of the globe, are welcome and actively encouraged. The goal of the Institute is to foster an interdisciplinary community of interest in the archaeology of the ancient world, and in the discipline of archaeology more generally. Its mandate is to promote research, fieldwork, teaching, and public outreach, with the Institute’s associated faculty, students, and facilities serving as a hub for this activity.

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Research Institutes and Working Groups

The Maya Research Program is a U.S.-based non-profit organization (501C3) that sponsors archaeological and ethnographic research in Middle America. Each summer since 1992, we have sponsored archaeological fieldwork at the ancient Maya site of Blue Creek in northwestern Belize and ethnographic research in the village of Yaxunah, Mexico. The Maya Research Program is affiliated with the University of Texas at Tyler.

A key MRP goal is to encourage the participation of students and volunteers -- anyone who wants to experience the real world of archaeological or anthropological research and understand how we learn about other cultures may join us. We see this as a critical educational component of MRP's work, and it helps us accomplish our research goals as well! The ages of our participants range from 18 to over 80. So many of our participants return year after year that MRP has become an extended family. About half of our participants are university students under 30 years old and the other half are professionals and retirees. While the majority of participants come from the United States and Canada, we have students from Australian, European, Latin American, and Japanese institutions as well. For students, academic credit can usually be arranged. While many students go on to careers in other fields, many go on to become successful graduate students in archaeology or a related field and return to focus on MRP projects for their theses and dissertations.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

Early Mediterranean Societies brings together various disciplines to promote an integrated study of these societies through presentations by group members of their own research, discussion of common readings, and lectures by outside speakers. The focus of this group is cultural diffusion and societal interconnections, but any interdisciplinary subject falls within the group's purview. (Donald Haggis, Classics, 962-7640)

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The Program in Aegean Scripts and Prehistory (PASP) was founded in 1986 by Thomas G. Palaima as a research center pertaining to the use of writing in Minoan Crete (Cretan Hieroglyphic and Linear A ca. 1850-1450 BCE), Mycenaean Greece and Mycenaeanized Crete (Linear B ca. 1450-1200 BCE) and the island of Cyprus (Cypro-Minoan in the Bronze Age and Cypriote Syllabic script in the historical period ca. 1500-1200 BCE and 750-225 BCE respectivley). PASP was supported by the Comité International pour les Études Myceniennes, the governing international body for work on these writing systems, their texts and their cultures.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

Founded in 1939, the Research Laboratories of Archaeology (RLA) was the first center for the study of North Carolina archaeology. Serving the interests of students, scholars, and the general public, it is currently one of the leading institutes for archaeological teaching and research in the South. Located within the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's College of Arts and Sciences, it provides support for faculty and students working not only in North Carolina, but also throughout the Americas and overseas.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

Aegean archaeology has had a prominent role at Sheffield for almost thirty years. This concentration led to the establishment in 1995 of the Sheffield Centre for Aegean Archaeology with the support of the University. Since then, the Centre has gone from strength to strength, and its identity was enhanced by the establishment of a Chair in Aegean Archaeology in January 2004. Never before has there been such a concentration of both staff and postgraduate researchers as there is today, and never before have we been able to offer staff, students and academic visitors alike such excellent and wide-ranging facilities for research. The Centre remains dedicated to providing an inter-disciplinary environment for research in to all aspects of the archaeology of the Aegean.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The 5-year project is directed by Dr. Sofia Voutsaki, Groningen Institute of Archaeology. It is financed by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) and the University of Groningen. Additional grants have been received by the Institute of Aegean Prehistory, Philadelphia. The aim of the project is to interpret the important social, political and cultural changes that took place in the southern Greek mainland during the Middle Helladic period and the transition to the Late Helladic (approx. 2000 - 1500 BC). No satisfactory explanation of these changes has ever been given, and they remain one of the most pressing questions of Greek archaeology. The central question, the redefinition of personal, ethnic and cultural identities within wider processes of socio-political change, has a wider relevance and is one of the most debated question in current theoretical debates in archaeology. The task is undertaken by means of an integrated analysis of settlement, funerary, skeletal and iconographic data from the Argolid, northeastern Peloponnese.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The Archaeology Center at Stanford provides a forum for interaction amongst faculty and students in different parts of the University. It promotes theoretical, methodological and ethical innovation and encourages visiting scholars, post-doctoral researchers, faculty and students to work side-by-side on a daily basis. There is a strong global range of interests, with student and faculty researchers working from Southeast Asia to Europe, Africa and the Americas.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The Wiener Laboratory is an active research department, within the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, dedicated to archaeological science in Greece. The laboratory was created through the vision of Malcolm H. Wiener and it remains sustained by his generosity. The Lab has grown since its inauguration on June 2, 1992, to offer a variety of fellowship opportunities, a library, and comparative reference collections, as well as a range of the specialist equipment and tools required by scholars exploring the past through scientific means. Research conducted at the Wiener Laboratory includes biological anthropology (the study of human skeletal remains), zooarchaeology (the study of animal bones), geoarchaeology (the study of soils and rocks, including metallurgy), and environmental studies (including the study of organic residues and botanical remains). Annual fellowships are offered in each of these areas.

Research Institutes and Working Groups
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