Fieldnotes: Digital Resources

A permanent list of digital resources in archaeology and related fields.

See also: Directory of Graduate Programs in the United States and Canada

The Graduate Group in the Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World trains students for careers in the art and archaeology of Classical and Near Eastern Civilizations. Drawing on the vast resources of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, AAMW incorporates fieldwork, museum internships, and university instruction into a flexible interdisciplinary program leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. All students accepted into the program are fully funded for a period of at least five years.
The interdepartmental Council on Archaeological Studies is composed of faculty from a broad range of disciplines, including Anthropology, Classics, Geology and Geophysics, and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations. Undergraduate and graduate programs are offered, the former awarding a BA and the latter an MA. Both programs are designed to expose students to numerous facets of the field of archaeology, including anthopology, art history, and history; studies often examine the material culture or transformation of various cultures in both the Old and New Worlds. Students in each program are, additionally, required to take an Archaeology Laboratory course which provides hands-on excavation experience at the Dye Works at Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.
The Johns Hopkins Undergraduate Program in Archaeology is an interdepartmental program that introduces students to archaeological theory, the analysis of archaeological materials, and the results of archaeological research in prehistoric and early historic periods in the Old and New Worlds. Archaeology studies human societies through examination of their material culture (physical remains), considering such issues as human subsistence, interaction with climate and physical environment, patterns of settlement, political and economic organization, and religious activity and thought. The field allows for the study of the entirety of human experience from its beginnings to the present day, in every region of the world and across all social strata.
 The Kenchreai Cemetery Project (2002-2006) was an interdisciplinary study of burial grounds at the eastern port of Corinth during the Roman Empire. This website summarizes the findings of the Kenchreai Cemetery Project. 
Mitrou is a tidal islet in the bay of Atalanti in East Lokris, Greece. For most, if not all, of the Bronze Age, Mitrou was the largest and most important settlement of East Lokris, and it is in an excellent state of preservation.
  The National Archaeological Museum is the largest museum in Greece and one of the world's great museums. Although its original purpose was to secure all the finds from the nineteenth century excavations in and around Athens, it gradually became the central National Archaeological Museum and was enriched with finds from all over Greece. Its abundant collections, with more than 11,000 exhibits, provide a panorama of Greek civilization from the beginnings of Prehistory to Late Antiquity.        
The Nemea Valley Archaeological Project (NVAP) is sponsored by Bryn Mawr College and conducted fieldwork under the auspices of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens with permissions from the Ministry of Culture and Sciences of Greece.
The Pylos Regional Archaeological Project (PRAP) is a multi-disciplinary, diachronic archaeological expedition formally organized in 1990 to investigate the history of prehistoric and historic settlement and land use in western Messenia in Greece, in an area centered on the Bronze Age administrative center known as the Palace of Nestor.
The Sikyon survey project (University of Thessaly in collaboration with the 37th Ephoreia of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities) is a fully integrated multidisciplinary research program to study the human presence and activity on the plateau of ancient Sikyon, a city in northeastern Peloponnese between Corinth and Achaia.

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