Fieldwork

Archaeological Field School at Oberlin Village

Location: Raleigh, NC, US

Season: May 30, 2018 to June 20, 2018

Deadline Type: Contact for details

Website: https://friendsofoberlinvillage.org/

Program Type:
Field school

RPA Certified:
no

Affiliation:
William Peace Univeristy

Project Director:
Vincent H. Melomo, Ph.D., Tom Beaman, M.A., R.P.A.

Project Description:

William Peace University is offering a field school in historical archaeology at Oberlin Village in Raleigh from May 30-June 20, 2018. Oberlin Village is one of Raleigh’s first Freedmen’s settlements founded just after the Civil War.  This African American community prospered into the early twentieth century, but many factors from Jim Crow to recent urban development have challenged the integrity and survival of the community over time.  Despite these challenges, several key historic structures and the village’s cemetery still remain, along with a dedicated network of village descendants and current residents. 

The field school will include archaeological investigations on one of the lots of the existing National Register designated properties in Oberlin Village, specifically the John T. and Mary Turner House. The field school will provide students training in basic methods of archaeological survey and excavation as they explore the history and culture of this community. The field school also includes training in an archaeological field lab, and students will hear guest lectures and take field trips to learn more about African American history and culture and archaeology in North Carolina.

The field school will be offered as a 4 credit course in Archaeological Fieldwork (ANT 450). The tuition for students is $1300. The course will require student participation from approximately 8:30am-4:30pm for the duration of the field school. Some online work will also be required.

The field school will be conducted through the cooperation of several individuals and institutions. Vinnie Melomo, Ph.D. and Tom Beaman, M.A., R.P.A., will team up to lead the investigation. Melomo is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at WPU and a Friends of Oberlin Village member, and Beaman is an Associate Professor in Anthropology at Wake Technical Community College. This will be the fifth field school in historical archaeology offered by Melomo and Beaman with William Peace University.

The field school will provide the following opportunities to participating students:

  • to gain experience in conducting archaeological research; 
  • to contribute to preserving an important part of Raleigh’s African American history;
  • to learn more about the history and culture of Oberlin Village through the archaeological investigation of one of its more prominent households;
  • to further academic understanding of Freedmen’s communities generally through comparison with other sites;
  • to be involved with Oberlin Village community members in investigating their own community’s past;
  • to recover material remains that could contribute to future exhibits and educational presentations on Oberlin Village;
  • and, to have research opportunities beyond the field school by assisting with the analysis of the material recovered, with the writing of the site report, and by conducting related research.

Period(s) of Occupation: Historical Archaeology, late 19th early 20th Century; African American Archaeology; Freedmen's Community

Notes:
William Peace University is offering a field school in historical archaeology at Oberlin Village in Raleigh from May 30-June 20, 2018. Oberlin Village is one of Raleigh’s first Freedmen’s settlements founded just after the Civil War. This African American community prospered into the early twentieth century, but many factors from Jim Crow to recent urban development have challenged the integrity and survival of the community over time. Despite these challenges, several key historic structures and the village’s cemetery still remain, along with a dedicated network of village descendants and current residents. The archaeological investigations will occur on one of the lots of the existing National Register designated properties in Oberlin Village, specifically the John T. and Mary Turner House. Students will receive training in basic methods of archaeological survey and excavation as they explore the history and culture of this community. The field school also includes training in an archaeological field lab, and students will hear guest lectures and take field trips to learn more about African American history and culture and archaeology in North Carolina. The field school will be offered as a 4 credit course in Archaeological Fieldwork (ANT 450). The tuition for students is $1300. The course will require student participation from approximately 8:30am-4:30pm for the duration of the field school. Some online work will also be required.

Project Size: 1-24 participants

Minimum Age: 17

Experience Required: No previous archaeological experience is required. Students should have taken an introductory course in archaeology, though students who have a passion for African American history and an interest in material culture are also encouraged to apply.

Room and Board Arrangements:
Room and board is not provided. We will commute to the excavation site daily and provide transportation from the University. Campus housing may be available if needed.   Cost:

Academic Credit:
4 credit hours credits offered by William Peace University. Tuition is $1300 tuition and fees. .

Contact Information:


Vincent Melomo

15 East Peace Street

Raleigh

North Carolina

27604

United States

vmelomo@peace.edu

Phone: 9195082277

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