Fieldwork

Lincoln Archaeological Field School 2020: Exploring Roman and Medieval Lincoln

COVID-19 NOTICE: Please be sure to reach out to the project contact to find out the status of their upcoming season. Many projects have cancelled fieldwork for 2020 and the information below may not reflect that.

Location: Lincoln, GB

Season: June 22, 2020 to July 17, 2020

Application Deadline: May 31, 2020

Deadline Type: Rolling

Website: http://www.diglincoln.com

RPA Certified:
No

Affiliation:
School of Humanities Bishop Grosseteste University Lincoln, Lincolnshire, UK

Project Director:
Dr Duncan Wright

Project Description:

Due to the COVID19 outbreak, we have made the difficult decision to postpone the 2020 Lincoln Archaeological Fieldschool. This is not a decision we have taken lightly, but delivery of a viable programme of teaching and research in June will clearly not be possible. We expect that the situation will be better in the summer of 2021, when the fieldschool will run again as normal. Thank you.

 

The Lincoln Archaeological Field School 

The Lincoln Archaeological Field School is a university-based training excavation which offers you the chance to gain fully-transferable academic credit at the same time as learning the key skills of archaeological fieldwork. The 2020 season will run from Monday 22nd June to Friday 17th July and is now accepting applications from international and UK students, as well as volunteers.

Based in the stunning historic city of Lincoln, England, you will have the chance to experience layers of history both on and off site. This year the Field School will continue to excavate the remarkable Roman and medieval archaeology in the heart of ancient Lincoln which we’ve identified in the past two years. All training on the Field School is provided by qualified and highly experienced staff, with teaching delivered through a combination of practical on-site training as well as lectures and workshops.

The Site

Over the past two summers the Archaeology Team at Bishop Grosseteste University (BGU) have been excavating the gardens of St Hugh’s; a property located on Newport, in the heart of historic Lincoln. The site is rich in Roman, medieval, and later archaeology, revealing important insights in the growth of urban and suburban Lincoln. St Hugh’s fronts onto the line of Ermine Street, and is situated only c.150m north of the Newport Arch, the northerly gate of the Roman town. Previous work has shown that during the Roman period this section of Ermine Street immediately north of the town became a focus for inhumation and cremation burials, as well as settlement. In the medieval period the suburb of Newport was served by an Augustinian friary, which documentary and cartographic sources suggest was located on the St Hugh’s site. The friary was situated on the edge of Newport Green, a long, narrow marketplace which formed the backbone of the suburb. Historic maps also show that, by at least the 18thcentury, Newport was surrounded by an enigmatic earthwork on three sides. Exactly when this bank and ditch was constructed has yet to be determined, but such features are rare for suburbs of historic towns and the purpose of the Lincoln example remains uncertain.

The team have excavated two trenches  thus far, one at the rear of the property and one at the front. Excavations at the rear identified the foundations of substantial medieval and post-medieval walls, buried at a significant depth due to later landscaping. These remains represent elements of the Augustinian friary, and the later private residence that occupied the site following the Dissolution. In the front trench, an extensive metalled surface appears to be the remains of Newport Green, beneath which are several phases of Roman occupation. The 2018 excavation located a probable Roman trader’s tenement, comprising a shop at the front of the property, behind which lay a workshop and domestic space, and a yard at the rear. Excavations found an inhumation at the interface of the inside and outside space, interments often known as ‘eaves-drip burials’. These burials are closely connected the properties of traders and craftspeople, and may have brought good luck or protection to the building. Further excavation of the front trench in the summer of 2019 located more Roman structures, the most significant of which was a plastered circular floor, and a sub-oval wall partially covered and surrounded by significant demolition material. The function of both features is uncertain, although the prevalence of metal working slag and cut antler cores in dumped material again suggests production and craft activities. The presence of painted wall plaster and a high proportion of valuable small finds hint at higher-status activity on the site, however.

The past two summers of archaeology have proved both successful and hugely exciting, with the discovery of some wonderful finds and features allowing the excavation team to characterise the nature and quality of the archaeology at St Hugh’s. In the summer of 2020 the fieldschool will return to the St Hugh’s site to complete the excavation of the fascinating Roman and medieval sequence at the front trench, delving deeper into the urban lives of those that shaped historic Lincoln.

Academic credit

The Field School offers you the chance to gain fully transferable academic credits, and is worth 5 US credits (or 10 ECTS or 20 UK credits). Credits will be awarded on completion of a fieldwork assignment, set at the beginning of the Field School. If you choose to earn credits, you will receive academic supervision and also be given access to our Digital Learning Environment, as well as the university’s well-resourced library and other facilities.

Optional self-catering accommodation during your attendance on the Field School is available in Bishop Grosseteste’s Halls dormitories at an additional cost (check-in on Sunday 10th June, check-out on Monday 9th July). Located in the historic heart of Roman and medieval Lincoln, the accommodation comprises individual bedrooms around a shared cooking and living space. The University’s dormitories are all located in the uphill district of Lincoln with a number of restaurants, food outlets and other shops within a few minutes’ walk. The excavation site is located across the street from student accommodation.

As archaeological excavation can be tough work, we operate a very civilized Monday to Friday working week. Having the weekend not only gives you time to rest but also offers you the perfect opportunity to explore Lincoln and beyond during your time with us!

Period(s) of Occupation: Roman, Medieval

Project Size: 1-24 participants

Minimum Length of Stay for Volunteers: One week

Minimum Age: 18

Experience Required: No previous experience required for participation as all training provided. Students requiring academic credits must be registered at a recognised university studying a relevant subject such as anthropology, archaeology, etc.

Room and Board Arrangements:
Optional self-catering accommodation during your attendance on the Field School is available in Bishop Grosseteste’s Halls dormitories at an additional cost. Located in the historic heart of Roman and medieval Lincoln, the accommodation comprises individual bedrooms around a shared cooking and living space. The University’s dormitories are all located in the uphill district of Lincoln with a number of restaurants, food outlets and other shops within a few minutes’ walk. Cost: £250 per week (non credited) OR £1500 for entire school (with academic credit)

Academic Credit:
20 UK CATS credits, equivalent to 10 ECTS credits or 5 US credits (subject to approval for transfer from your host institution). credits offered by School of Humanities Bishop Grosseteste University Lincoln, UK. Tuition is During the 2019 season Field School students will be given formal tuition in the following activities: Archaeological project management including health and safety, Geophysical site survey techniques, Artefact and landscape 3D modelling, Excavation strategy and decision making, Stratigraphic (single-context) recording systems, Completing archaeological context descriptions, Plan and section drawing Surveying and levelling (including DGPS survey), Archaeological photography, Processing and recording archaeological artefacts, including basic conservation methods, Processing environmental archaeological samples, including flotation sieving, Introduction to the post-excavation process..

Contact Information:


Dr Duncan Wright

School of Humanities, Bishop Grosseteste University

Lincoln

Lincolnshire

LN1 3DY

United Kingdom

duncan.wright@bishopg.ac.uk

Phone: +44 1522 583774

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