Talk to the Team

Excavations within Grid H

Comments

Hi there,

This is swamini. 

I have been writting a story book lately which is based a lot on archeology. Since I am not familiar with the way it works, I am much interested to know more about its ethics, rules and the way it works. It would be of great help if you would share some basic information about archeology. 

THANKYOU!

Hi, I'm writing a book. It isn't about archaeology as a whole, but the first couple chapters are set on a dig site, so I was hoping to make it as authentic as possible. If there's any way I could have a very brief interview with someone that has personal experience with this sort of thing, I would be really grateful

I think I fount a savertooth Tigers tooth

Hi!

I'm an Anthropology student in the U.S. I'm interested in the archaeology and history of the Middle Ages.  Is there a way I can join your team for field school credit possibly this summer?

Thanks!

Hi

I am a grade 11 student doing a research project on your Blackfriary excavation. I was wondering if you could tell me what methods you have used to date your site findings and also what some of the major conclusions your teams have come to about the culture of the Friary in the late medieval time period?  

Thank you very much for any help you can give me with my research. 

Sincerely,

Will Burns

Collingwood Collegiate Institute, Ontario, Canada 

Hey there Will,

 

Thanks for the question, and for the interest in our project.

There are lots of ways to date a site, and we use most of them.

Radiocarbon dating - organic remains (such as charcoal or human bones) can be dated using radiocarbon dating.  We have just started a radiocarbon dating program to see the date range of the burials on site. It is expensive though :-(

Coins - we find medieval coins, and they have dates on them! So, if we find a coin in a feature, we know that feature is only as old as the coin, or younger.

Pottery - pottery styles can be very diagnostic; different techniques were used at different times in different places. For example, there is a type of medieval pottery associated with the town where our dig is, called 'Trim ware'

Other artefacts - for example, a clay pipe must be post the introduction of tobacco.

 

I hope this is of help. Keep in touch, and best of luck with your studies.

 

Steve

Hello!

What an amazing work! Congratulations! 

I am from Spain but I am studing at the Sheffield University (UK). I already have experience from my country but I would like to gain some experience volunteering abroad. Is possible to join your team as a volunteer?

Thank you!

Hi Paloma,

First of all, I am so sorry for taking so long to reply.  Sad an embarassing story that I will spare you.

Thank you for your kind comments.

As our dig is funded principally by the students who come to learn to dig, we do not operate a volunteer program.  There are volunteer digs in the UK and europe, I suggest you google them!

We do have an internship program, which you can find on our website (www.iafs.ie).

 

Best of luck in your career.

 

Steve

what should i look for in a collage for historic archaeologist 

Hi there,

I am very sorry it took so long to reply - an error on our side, too boring to explain.

Archaeology is a huge discipline, and I would encourage you to do your research!

You can choose an area (for example, in Ireland, most archaeologists concentrate in Irish archaeology and look at the UK and europe for context.

You can study Greek and Roman Civilisation - the classics.

You can study applied archaeology, which focusses on the techniques that archaeologists use to identiy and study sites.

If you are not too sure, then I suggest you choose a college with a broad degree that will allow you to 'taste' the different disciplines.

 

I would then encourage you to go on to at least Masters level if you wish to have a career in archaeology, and to specialise at that stage into the area that interests you most.

 

Best of luck with your studies,

Steve

Hey there Sharron Han,

We are two students from Glen Innes High School, Australia, NSW.

Just wanted to ask what it is like to work on a Dig. Please get back to us on our email if you can. :)

Kind regards,

Molly and Amber

Hi Molly and Amber,

First of all, I am so sorry for taking so long to reply.  Sad an embarassing story that I will spare you.

What is it like?....

Hard work, fun, muddy, hot, cold, exciting, repetitive, amazing.

For me, the sense of discovery is the most amazing part.  There is always a buzz on the site.

Also, because our dig is in the heart of the community and one of our core goals is to bring heritage to our local community, there is always somebody to talk to, somebody interested in what you are doing.

Have a go!

Steve

Dear Christian De Ville

Hello my name is Blake Dawson and i am a year 11 high school history student, as part of our course we have to ask members of an active Archaeological digsite a question.

So what is it like working on an Archaeological dig?

P.S Nice sunnies :)

Hi Blake,

First of all, I am so sorry for taking so long to reply.  Sad an embarassing story that I will spare you.

I am sure that this is way too late for your study, but here you go:

What is it like?....

Hard work, fun, muddy, hot, cold, exciting, repetitive, amazing.

For me, the sense of discovery is the most amazing part.  There is always a buzz on the site.

Also, because our dig is in the heart of the community and one of our core goals is to bring heritage to our local community, there is always somebody to talk to, somebody interested in what you are doing.

Have a go!

Steve

Hi  Sarah Brown

We are curentally doin a reaserch project in Ancient history about what its like on a dig site

What is it like on the dig site for you.

Thank you

SARA & REBECCA

 

Hi Sara and Rebecca,

First of all, I am so sorry for taking so long to reply.  Sad an embarassing story that I will spare you.

I am sure that this is way too late for your study, but here you go:

What is it like?....

Hard work, fun, muddy, hot, cold, exciting, repetitive, amazing.

For me, the sense of discovery is the most amazing part.  There is always a buzz on the site.

Also, because our dig is in the heart of the community and one of our core goals is to bring heritage to our local community, there is always somebody to talk to, somebody interested in what you are doing.

Have a go!

Steve

For an in-class assignment, I had to contact a person working on the Blackfriars project and ask them what it's like to work on a Dig.

 

regards, Daniel O'Hara

Hi Daniel,

First of all, I am so sorry for taking so long to reply.  Sad an embarassing story that I will spare you.

I am sure this is way too late to include in your studies, but here you go:

What is it like?....

Hard work, fun, muddy, hot, cold, exciting, repetitive, amazing.

For me, the sense of discovery is the most amazing part.  There is always a buzz on the site.

Also, because our dig is in the heart of the community and one of our core goals is to bring heritage to our local community, there is always somebody to talk to, somebody interested in what you are doing.

Have a go!

Steve

what is it like to work on the blackfriars dig?

Hi Lachlan,

First of all, I am so sorry for taking so long to reply.  Sad an embarassing story that I will spare you..

What is it like to dig at the Blackfriary?....

Hard work, fun, muddy, hot, cold, exciting, repetitive, amazing.

For me, the sense of discovery is the most amazing part.  There is always a buzz on the site.

Also, because our dig is in the heart of the community and one of our core goals is to bring heritage to our local community, there is always somebody to talk to, somebody interested in what you are doing.

Have a go!

Steve

Hi Tatiana,

We are a group of students from Australia who have recently started studying Ancient History. We were wondering what it is like to work on a real dig? What role do you play? How did you become part of the team?

 

We would love to hear back about your experiences!

 

Yas, Rach, Em

Hi Rach and Em,

First of all, I am so sorry for taking so long to reply.  Sad an embarassing story that I will spare you.

I hope you guys are enjoying your studies.  I would strongly suggest that as part of your studies you participate in an excavation.

What is it like?....

Hard work, fun, muddy, hot, cold, exciting, repetitive, amazing.

For me, the sense of discovery is the most amazing part.  There is always a buzz on the site.

Also, because our dig is in the heart of the community and one of our core goals is to bring heritage to our local community, there is always somebody to talk to, somebody interested in what you are doing.

Have a go!

Steve

Hi,

my name is Stephanie Pastwa. I gained my BA in prehistoric archaeology at the university of Hamburg, Germany. I'll start my MA in the fall of 2015 and have some freetime to fill. So i am searching for a job as a archaelogist or as a helper at a excavation.

Do you know, by any chance, somebody who needs people at a excavation?

Best wishes,

Stephanie Pastwa

Hi there Stephanie,

Many thanks fo your email and my sincerest apologies for not replying for so very long. This is completely our fault as we had not set up a system to notify us of questions, and didn't check!

I hope your career is progressing nicely.  There are usually a number of volunteer digs in the UK and around Europe - ask google.

Our site is funded by the students that come to learn to dig.  We do also operate an internship program, so if you check out our webiste you can see ways to get involved (www.iafs.ie).

Kind regards

Steve

Add new comment

Dig Deeper

Email the AIA
Subscribe to the AIA e-Update

Sign Up!