Lecture Program

AIA Lecturer: Kate Liszka

Affiliation: California State University, San Bernardino

Dr. Kate Liszka is Assistant Professor with the Department of History at California State University, San Bernardino, and holds her degrees from the University of Pennsylvania (Ph.D.), and from 2012 to 2015 was a Cotsen Postdoctoral Fellow and Lecturer with Princeton University.  Her areas of specialization are Nubians in Egypt, the Medjay, ethnicity and identity in Antiquity, multicultural Interactions in frontier regions, the Pangrave Archaeological Culture, and large-scale mining expeditions in Antiquity.  Dr. Liszka is the Director of the Wadi el-Hudi Expedition in the Egyptian Eastern Desert.

Abstracts:


Ancient Egyptians believed that their name, their body, and their memory needed to be preserved to ensure life after death.  So that their memory would persevere for the rest of eternity, they were frequently buried in large visible tombs with the often-luxurious objects that they needed in the afterlife.  These wealth-filled tombs acted like a beacon of opportunity for criminals.  Learn how various tombs were broken into in antiquity, how the Egyptian designed their tombs in an attempt to ward off tomb robbers, and how the tomb robbers were tried and punished for their crimes.

Short bibliography and/or website on lecture topic:

Pascal Vernus, Affairs and Scandals in Ancient Egypt Chapter 1 (for the New Kingdom material, but I cover the topic through time.)

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