Meet Our Lecturers

Dr. Kate Liszka is Assistant Professor with the Department of History at California State University, San Bernardino, and holds her degrees from the University of Pennsylvania (Ph.D.), and from 2012 to 2015 was a Cotsen Postdoctoral Fellow and Lecturer with Princeton University.  Her areas of specialization are Nubians in Egypt, the Medjay, ethnicity and identity in Antiquity, multicultural Interactions in frontier regions, the Pangrave Archaeological Culture, and large-scale mining expeditions in Antiquity.  Dr. Liszka is the Director of the Wadi el-Hudi Expedition in the Egyptian Eastern Desert.

Dr. Lorentzen is a Postdoctoral Research Assistant with the Cornell Tree-Ring Laboratory, and holds her degrees from Cornell University.  Her fields of research include dendrochronology and dendroecology, Late Quaternary paleocology and paleoclimate, and enviornmental archaeology.  Her current research projects include the Southern Levant Dendrochronology Project, the Computational Research on the Near East (CRANE) Project, the Kalavasos and Maroni Built Environments (KAMBE) Project, the Edom Lowlands Regional Archaeology Project, and several other projects in Israel, Jordan, and North America.

Dr. Kristian Lorenzo is currently with the Meadows School, was previous at Hollins University, and holds his degrees from the University of Wisconsin, Madison (Ph.D.) and the State University of New York at Buffalo. His areas of specialization are Classical archaeology and material culture, languages and literature, and Ancient Near Eastern culture.  His recent publications include “East defeats West: Naval warfare and cross-cultural adaptation in Classical Cyprus” in PoCA (Postgraduate Cypriot Archaeology) 2012 (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2015) and “Triremes on land: First-fruits for the Battle of Salamis.” in Autopsy in Athens. Recent Archaeological Research on Athens and Attica (Oxbow Books, 2015).

Kathleen Lynch is Associate Professor of Classics at the University of Cincinnati, and has also taught at Washington University in St. Louis, Southern Illinois University, and the University of Missouri. She is a specialist in Greek pottery, particularly vase-painting and the social aspects of pottery, and has completed fieldwork in Albania, Greece, and Turkey. She earned her Ph.D. and her M.A. at the University of Virginia, after completing her undergraduate work at Boston University. She has published widely, and has received numerous awards, grants and fellowships for her work.

 

One of Professor Lynch's main publications is The Symposium in Context: Pottery from a Late Archaic House near the Athenian Agora, published as Hesperia supplement 46, 2011. This volume addresses for the first time a collection of pottery used at symposia that has been found in a domestic context in Athens (rather than a funerary context, which is more usual for such pottery). In the volume Professor Lynch discusses form, function, and context without ignoring the social aspects of Athenian drinking parties as well as other household activities. More details can be found at: http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/index.php/publications/book/?i=9780876615461

Dr. Lyons is Curator of Antiquities with the J. Paul Getty Museum, and holds her degrees from Bowdoin College and Bryn Mawr College (MA and PhD).  Her areas of specialization are the art and archaeology of pre-Roman Italy, Etruria and Magna Graecia, Greek vase painting, the rediscovery and reception of classical antiquity, 19th century photography, and cultural heritage policy.  Awards received by Dr. Lyons include the 2013 AIA Martha and Artemis Joukowsky Distinguished Service Award, and she is the 2018/2019 AIA Cinelli Lecturer.

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