Meet Our Lecturers

Morag Kersel is with the Department of Anthropology at DePaul University, and holds her degrees from Cambridge University (Ph.D.), the University of Georgia (M.H.P.), the University of Toronto (M.A.) and Queen’s University (B.A.H.).  Her areas of specialization are Eastern Mediterranean and Levantine Prehistory, cultural heritage protection and policy (trade in antiquities, museum practice, and archaeological ethics), and archaeological field school teaching methods.  She is co-director of both the Following the Pots Project in Jordan and the Galilee Prehistory Project in Israel.  Dr. Kersel is the AIA Wilkie Lecturer for 2016/2017.

Kristina Killgrove is Assistant Professor of Anthropology with teh University of West Florida, and she holds her degrees from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Ph.D.), East Carolina University, and the University of Virginia.  Her fields of study are bioarchaeology, Roman archaeology, stable isotope analysis, 3D scanning and printing, and outreach in archaeology; she is currently the human osteologist for the Gabii Project in Rome.  Her current publication projects include “Using skeletal remains as a proxy for Roman lifestyles: the potential and problems with osteological reconstructions of health, diet, and stature in Imperial Rome” in Diet and Nutrition in the Roman World (C. Holleran and P. Erdkamp, eds. Routledge, in press), and “Imperialism and physiological stress in Rome and its environs (1st-3rd centuries AD)” in Bioarchaeology of Contact, Colonialism, and Imperialism (H. Klaus and M. Murphy, eds. University Press of Florida, in press).

Carl Knappett is the Walter Graham/Homer Thompson Chair in Aegean Prehistory at the University of Toronto, and holds his degrees from the University of Cambridge (Ph.D. in Archaeology).  His areas of specialization are Bronze Age Crete and the eastern Mediterranean, early urbanism and political geography, theories of materiality, network analysis, ceramic analysis, and early art/semiotics/cognitive archaeology.  He has received various awards for his work, and is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London.  He has several  books forthcoming, including Networks of Maritime Connectivity in the Ancient Mediterranean (ed. with J. Leidwanger, Oxford University Press).

Andrew Koh is Assistant Professor and Director of Graduate Studies with the Department of Classical Studies at Brandeis University, as well as Affiliated Facullty with the Department of Anthropology and a Florence Levy Kay Fellow with the Department of Chemistry there. He also is faculty with the Center for Materials Research in Archaeology with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  He holds his degrees from the University of Pennsylvania (Ph.D.) and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and his areas of specialization are Greek art and archaeology, Aegean prehistory, Bronze and Iron Age Mediterranean, archaeological and conservation science, GIS, the cultural heritage of Crete, the Silk Road, ancient craftsmanship and commodities, and cultural hybridity.  Professor Koh's publication projects include Luxury Trade and Social Complexity in the Ancient Mediterranean World (forthcoming, Cambridge University Pres).

Lynne Lancaster is Professor with the Department of Classics and World Religions at Ohio University, Athens. She holds her degrees from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (B.A. in architecture), Lincoln College (M.A. in Classical Archaeology), and Wolfson College, Oxford University (Ph.D. in Classical Archaeology). Her interests include Roman architecture, construction and technology and she has worked on many of the standing structures in Rome including Trajan’s Markets and the Colosseum, and as architectural consultant at various locations in Italy.  She has also conducted surveys of provincial vaulting techniques in Tunisia, Turkey, Egypt, Britain and Greece.  Professor Lancaster has published extensively, and her Concrete Vaulted Construction in Imperial Rome: Innovation in Context (Cambridge University Press, 2005) received the AIA’s 2007 James R. Wiseman Book Award.  In 2010/2011 she held the AIA Joukowsky Lecturership.

 

See Lynne Lancaster's work in the American Journal of Archaeology:

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