Meet Our Lecturers

Mark Lawall is Associate Professor with the Department of Classics, University of Manitoba.  He holds his degrees from the University of Michigan (Ph.D. and MA) and the College of William and Mary.  His areas of specialization are amphora studies (Archaic through Hellenistic transport amphoras), and the archaeology of ancient economies, particularly of trade and markets; he has conducted amphora research at Athens, Corinth, Isthmia, Gordion, Ephesos, Klazomenai, Troy, the Kyrenia shipwreck, the Pabuc Burnu shipwreck, Stryme, Olbia, Koptos, Lerna, and Rhodes.  Professor Lawall’s recent publications include Pottery, People and Places: Study and Interpretation of Late Hellenistic Pottery (editor with P. Guldager Bilde, Black Sea Studies 16, Aarhus, 2014), and “Transport amphoras and market behavior in the economies of Classical and Hellenistic Greece” in E. M. Harris, D. M. Lewis and M. Woolmer (eds.) The Ancient Greek Economy: Markets, Households, and City-States (Cambridge, 2015).

David Lee is an independent rock art researcher, author and lecturer focusing on the function and context of rock art in the Great Basin and the Mojave Desert, and the ethnography of Australian rock art. He has recorded Native American rock art in California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, and Idaho, and has co-authored several papers and reports on the rock art of the Mojave Desert and the Great Basin. For the last ten years he has been studying rock art and associated traditional knowledge in the Northern Territory of Australia, and is currently assisting researchers at the Centre for Rock Art Research and Management at the University of Western Australia on the first international comparative study of arid lands rock art. 

Justin Leidwanger is Assistant Professor with the Department of Classics, Stanford University; he holds his degrees from the University Pennsylvania (Ph.D.), Texas A&M University, and Loyola University.  His research interests include the economic networks that shaped ancient maritime commerce during the Roman and Late Antique era.  Professor Leidwanger is the Director of the Stanford University/Soprintendenza del Mare Marzamemi Maritime Heritage Project (Pachino, Siracusa, Sicily), and Co-Director of the Middle East Technical University/Brock University/Stanford University Burgaz Harbors Project (Burgaz, Datça, Muğla, Turkey).  He is also the Principle Investigator for a number of projects on the Yassıada shipwreck, and an Eastern Mediterranean study of basket-handle amphoras.  Professor Leidwanger is the AIA's McCann/Taggart Lecturer for 2016/2017.

Professor Stephen Lekson is with the University of Colorado, and holds his Ph.D. from the University of New Mexico.  He specializes in the archaeology of the U.S. Southwest, particularly Chaco Canyon and the Mimbres region.  He has worked on numerous field projects, most recently at Woodrow Ruin, Black Mountain, and Pinnacle Ruin in New Mexico, and at Chimney Rock Great House in Colorado.

Dr. Kristian Lorenzo is Visitng Assistant Professor at Hollins University, and holds his degrees from the University of Wisconsin, Madison (Ph.D.) and the State University of New York at Buffalo. His areas of specialization are Classical archaeology and material culture, languages and literature, and Ancient Near Eastern culture.  His recent publications include “East defeats West: Naval warfare and cross-cultural adaptation in Classical Cyprus” in PoCA (Postgraduate Cypriot Archaeology) 2012 (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2015) and “Triremes on land: First-fruits for the Battle of Salamis.” in Autopsy in Athens. Recent Archaeological Research on Athens and Attica (Oxbow Books, 2015).

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