Meet Our Lecturers

Yorke M. Rowan is a Research Associate in the Archaeology of the Southern Levant with the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago.  He holds his degrees from the University of Texas (Ph.D. and MA) and the University of Virginia.  He is director of the Galilee Prehistory Project, co-directs the excavations at the Chalcolithic site of Marj Rabba, and co-directs the Eastern Badia Research Project, which involves survey and excavation at Maitland’s Mesa and Wisad Pools, two sites in the Black Desert of Jordan.  Dr. Rowan's current research interests include the ritual and mortuary practice of the Southern Levantine Chalcolithic Period, and ground stone assemblages from the Late Prehistoric to Early Historic Perionds in the Southern Levant.  His most recent edited volume, Beyond Belief: The Archaeology of Religion and Ritual (2012) draws together theoretical and methodological studies concerning ancient religion and ritual.  As a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow at the W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research, Jerusalem during 2013-14, Dr. Rowan is preparing a monograph on the survey and excavations of Marj Rabba.

Kathryn Sampeck is Assistant Professor of Anthropology with Illinois State College, and holds her degrees from Tulane University (Ph.D.) and the University of Chicago.  Her areas of specialization include the archaeology and ethnohistory of Mesoamerica and the U.S. Southeast, the Andes, landscape archaeology, colonialism, foodways, political economy, urbanism, money economies, and ceramics.  She is the Principal Investigator for the Colonial Cherokee Landscapes Project, and has conducted fieldwork in El Salvador, Eastern Tennessee, Honduras (Copán), Bolivia, Southern Louisiana, Cantabrian Spain, and Kenya.  Professor Sampeck has numerous works in press and in review, is preparing a monograph on How Chocolate Came to Be, and most recently published "From Ancient Altepetl to Modern Municipio: Surveying as Power in Colonial Guatemala" in the International Journal of Historical Archaeology (2014).

Brent Seales is the Gill Professor and Director of the Center for Visualization and Virtual Environments at the University of Kentucky, and holds his degrees from the University of Wisconsin (Ph.D. and M.S.), and University Southwestern Louisiana (B.S.).  His area of specialization is digital imaging and cultural heritage, and “virtual unwrapping” of the Herculaneum papyri.

Heather Sharpe is Assistant Professor of Art History at West Chester University; she holds her degrees from California State University, Long Beach, and Indiana University, Bloomington (MA and PhD).  Professor Sharpe's areas of specialization are Greek and Roman small bronzes, and her publications include "Bronze Statuettes from the Athenian Agora: Evidence for Domestic Cults in Roman Greece" in Hesperia (83, 2014).

R. Angus K. Smith is Associate Professor of Greek Archaeology with the Classics Department of Brock University; he holds his degrees from Dartmouth College, Cambridge University (MPhil), and Bryn Mawr College (MA, PhD).   His research interests are Greek archaeology, Aegean prehistory, ceramic analysis, and mortuary analysis, he is currently Associate Director of excavations at the Minoan town of Gournia on Crete, and he was Co-Director of the recently completed Ayia Sotira excavation project at Nemea.  Professor Smith is the 2018 recipient of the Brock University Faculty of Humanities Award for Excellence in Research and Creative Activity.

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