Meet Our Lecturers

Eric Cline is Chair and Associate Professor of Classical and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the George Washington University and Director of the GWU Capitol Archaeological Institute.  He holds his degrees from the University of Pennsylvania (Ph.D.), Yale University, and Dartmouth College.  His areas of specialization include the military history of the Mediterranean, and the international connections between Greece, Egypt, and the Near East during the Late Bronze Age.  Professor Cline is the Associate Director of the Megiddo Expedition, and Co-Director of the excavations at Tel Kabri.  He is also one of the 36 inaugural NEH Public Scholars announced in July 2015; the Public Scholars program is a major new initiative designed to promote the publication of scholarly nonfiction books for general audiences, and Professor Cline was chosen for his upcoming work on "Digging up Armageddon: The Story of Biblical Megiddo from Canaanites to Christians".

 

See Eric Cline's work in the American Journal of Archaeology:

Amanda Crompton is Visiting Assistant Professor with the Department of Archaeology at Memorial University.  She holds her degrees from Memorial University (Ph.D.) and Simon Fraser University, and her research interests are historical archaeology, French colonial archaeology, French fisheries, and trade networks.  She has several articles and book chapters in preparation on the Inuit in Southern Labrador, and French-Inuit contact and exchange.

Dr. Stephanie Dalley is a Retired Research Fellow in Assyriology with the Faculty of Oriental Studies at Oxford, and is currently an Honorary Senior Research Fellow at Somerville College and a member of the Common Room at Wolfson College.  She holds her degrees from Newnham College, Cambridge, and her research interests are Akkadian literature and history.  She has published extensively, her most recent book-length work is The Mystery of the Hanging Garden of Babylon: an elusive world wonder traced (2013), and her works in progress include A History of the city of Babylon (Cambridge University Press).  Dr. Dalley is an AIA Norton Lecturer for 2015-2016.

Michael Danti is Academic Director of Cultural Heritage Initiatives with the American Schools of Oriental Research.  He holds his degrees from the University of Pennsylvania (Ph.D.) and Purdue University, and is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London.  His areas of specialization are Near Eastern archaeology, Mesopotamia, Iran, cultural heritage management, museum studies, archaeological method and theory, and complex societies.  He is currently Director of Excavations at Tell es-Sweyhat (Syria) and Rowanduz (Iraqi Kurdistan).  Dr. Danti's current publication projects include "Assyrianizing Contexts at Hasanlu Tepe IVb?:  Materiality and Identity in Northwest Iran" (with Megan Cifarelli, forthcoming in The Provincial Archaeology of the Assyrian Empire) and "The Rowanduz Archaeological Program 2013–14: First Preliminary Report on Research in Iraqi Kurdistan" (forthcomoing, Antiquity).

 

 

Gwyn Davies is Associate Professor with the History Department of Florida International University, and holds his degrees from the Institute of Archaeology, University College London (Ph.D., M.Res., B.A.), Vrije Universiteit Brussel (LL.M.), and University College Wales (LL.B.).  He is the co-director of the Yotvata Roman Fort Project, Israel, and his areas of specialization include Roman siege works.  He has published extensively, and current projects include The 2003-2007 Excavations in the Late Roman Fort at Yotvata (with J. Magness, Eisenbrauns), and "Siege Warfare 27 BC- AD 295" in The Encyclopedia of the Roman Army (Wiley-Blackwell).

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