Fieldnotes: Digital Resources

A permanent list of digital resources in archaeology and related fields.

See also: Directory of Graduate Programs in the United States and Canada

The Institute of Classical Archaeology (ICA) carries out multi-disciplinary archaeological research, conservation, and cultural resource management projects in the territory of ancient Greek colonies in southern Italy and on the Black Sea coast of Ukraine. ICA was established as a research unit in the College of Liberal Arts at the University of Texas, Austin, in 1974. Over the past 30 years, with major support from public and private sources, ICA has developed long-term projects to explore the agricultural hinterlands of ancient Metapontum and Croton in Italy and the territory and urban area of ancient Chersonesos in Crimea, Ukraine. Principal collaborators include the Archaeological Superintendencies of Calabria and Basilicata and the National Preserve of Tauric Chersonesos at Sevastopol. ICA's publications and research have brought it international recognition as a leader in the study of rural populations in the Greek and Roman world.
The Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World is dedicated to the academic study and public promotion of the archaeology and art of the ancient Mediterranean, Egypt, and Western Asia (the latter broadly construed as extending from Anatolia and the Levant to the Caucasus, and including the territories of the ancient Near East); our principal research interests lie in the complex societies of the pre-modern era. Although the core efforts of the Joukowsky Institute are archaeological in nature and are located within this broadly defined zone, close ties with all individuals interested in the ancient world, and with archaeologists of all parts of the globe, are welcome and actively encouraged. The goal of the Institute is to foster an interdisciplinary community of interest in the archaeology of the ancient world, and in the discipline of archaeology more generally. Its mandate is to promote research, fieldwork, teaching, and public outreach, with the Institute’s associated faculty, students, and facilities serving as a hub for this activity. -->
The Maya Research Program is a U.S.-based non-profit organization (501C3) that sponsors archaeological and ethnographic research in Middle America. Each summer since 1992, we have sponsored archaeological fieldwork at the ancient Maya site of Blue Creek in northwestern Belize and ethnographic research in the village of Yaxunah, Mexico. The Maya Research Program is affiliated with the University of Texas at Tyler. A key MRP goal is to encourage the participation of students and volunteers -- anyone who wants to experience the real world of archaeological or anthropological research and understand how we learn about other cultures may join us. We see this as a critical educational component of MRP's work, and it helps us accomplish our research goals as well! The ages of our participants range from 18 to over 80. So many of our participants return year after year that MRP has become an extended family. About half of our participants are university students under 30 years old and the other half are professionals and retirees. While the majority of participants come from the United States and Canada, we have students from Australian, European, Latin American, and Japanese institutions as well. For students, academic credit can usually be arranged. While many students go on to careers in other fields, many go on to become successful graduate students in archaeology or a related field and return to focus on MRP projects for their theses and dissertations.
Early Mediterranean Societies brings together various disciplines to promote an integrated study of these societies through presentations by group members of their own research, discussion of common readings, and lectures by outside speakers. The focus of this group is cultural diffusion and societal interconnections, but any interdisciplinary subject falls within the group's purview. (Donald Haggis, Classics, 962-7640)
The Program in Aegean Scripts and Prehistory (PASP) was founded in 1986 by Thomas G. Palaima as a research center pertaining to the use of writing in Minoan Crete (Cretan Hieroglyphic and Linear A ca. 1850-1450 BCE), Mycenaean Greece and Mycenaeanized Crete (Linear B ca. 1450-1200 BCE) and the island of Cyprus (Cypro-Minoan in the Bronze Age and Cypriote Syllabic script in the historical period ca. 1500-1200 BCE and 750-225 BCE respectivley). PASP was supported by the Comité International pour les Études Myceniennes, the governing international body for work on these writing systems, their texts and their cultures.
Founded in 1939, the Research Laboratories of Archaeology (RLA) was the first center for the study of North Carolina archaeology. Serving the interests of students, scholars, and the general public, it is currently one of the leading institutes for archaeological teaching and research in the South. Located within the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's College of Arts and Sciences, it provides support for faculty and students working not only in North Carolina, but also throughout the Americas and overseas.
Aegean archaeology has had a prominent role at Sheffield for almost thirty years. This concentration led to the establishment in 1995 of the Sheffield Centre for Aegean Archaeology with the support of the University. Since then, the Centre has gone from strength to strength, and its identity was enhanced by the establishment of a Chair in Aegean Archaeology in January 2004. Never before has there been such a concentration of both staff and postgraduate researchers as there is today, and never before have we been able to offer staff, students and academic visitors alike such excellent and wide-ranging facilities for research. The Centre remains dedicated to providing an inter-disciplinary environment for research in to all aspects of the archaeology of the Aegean.
The 5-year project is directed by Dr. Sofia Voutsaki, Groningen Institute of Archaeology. It is financed by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) and the University of Groningen. Additional grants have been received by the Institute of Aegean Prehistory, Philadelphia. The aim of the project is to interpret the important social, political and cultural changes that took place in the southern Greek mainland during the Middle Helladic period and the transition to the Late Helladic (approx. 2000 - 1500 BC). No satisfactory explanation of these changes has ever been given, and they remain one of the most pressing questions of Greek archaeology. The central question, the redefinition of personal, ethnic and cultural identities within wider processes of socio-political change, has a wider relevance and is one of the most debated question in current theoretical debates in archaeology. The task is undertaken by means of an integrated analysis of settlement, funerary, skeletal and iconographic data from the Argolid, northeastern Peloponnese.
The Archaeology Center at Stanford provides a forum for interaction amongst faculty and students in different parts of the University. It promotes theoretical, methodological and ethical innovation and encourages visiting scholars, post-doctoral researchers, faculty and students to work side-by-side on a daily basis. There is a strong global range of interests, with student and faculty researchers working from Southeast Asia to Europe, Africa and the Americas.
The Wiener Laboratory is an active research department, within the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, dedicated to archaeological science in Greece. The laboratory was created through the vision of Malcolm H. Wiener and it remains sustained by his generosity. The Lab has grown since its inauguration on June 2, 1992, to offer a variety of fellowship opportunities, a library, and comparative reference collections, as well as a range of the specialist equipment and tools required by scholars exploring the past through scientific means. Research conducted at the Wiener Laboratory includes biological anthropology (the study of human skeletal remains), zooarchaeology (the study of animal bones), geoarchaeology (the study of soils and rocks, including metallurgy), and environmental studies (including the study of organic residues and botanical remains). Annual fellowships are offered in each of these areas.