Prehistoric Hand Axes Recovered in Israel

Archaeology News - January 9, 2018

TEL AVIV, ISRAEL—The Guardian reports that hundreds of well-preserved Acheulian axes and other artifacts have been discovered at a site in central Israel that dates back around 500,000 years. Researchers from the Israel Antiquities Authority and Tel Aviv University noted that the site had been located near a stream, offered a ready supply of flint, and had plenty of vegetation and animals, making it an ideal seasonal camp for Homo erectus hunter-gatherers. For more, go to “Homo erectus Stands Alone.”

Categories: Blog

Ancient Wooden Board Game Identified in Slovakia

Archaeology News - January 6, 2018

POPRAD, SLOVAKIA—The Slovak Spectator reports that a wooden game board and green and white playing pieces has been recovered from the 1,600-year-old tomb of a Germanic prince. “It's the best preserved ancient wooden board game that has been found to the north of the Mediterranean Sea,” said Ulrich Schädler of the Museum of Games in Lake Geneva, Switzerland. Scientists have determined the glass playing pieces were made in the eastern Mediterranean, perhaps in Syria. Karol Pieta of the Archaeological Institute in Nitra thinks the Germanic prince who owned the game may have served in the Roman army and brought it home to the Tatras Mountain region from the Roman Empire. Schädler is trying to figure out how the game was played. For more, go to “The Video Game Graveyard.”

Categories: Blog

Ancient Irrigation System Found in Northwest China

Archaeology News - January 6, 2018

 

ST LOUIS, MISSOURI—Newsweek reports that a team of archaeologists led by Yuqi Li of Washington University in St. Louis has discovered an irrigation system dating to the third or fourth century A.D. in the foothills of northwestern China’s Tian Shan Mountains. The researchers spotted the canals, cisterns, and check dams with drones and satellite imagery, and created a 3-D model of the site with aerial photographs and photogrammetry software. “The systems built by the local agropastoralists were oriented towards conservation and efficiency,” Li explained. “They were built in an energetically conservative way and they emphasized water storage rather than constant supply of water.” The region where the irrigation system was found lies along the central corridor of the Silk Road. Li suggests knowledge of irrigation technology may have spread along the trade route, with staple crops like wheat and millet. To read about another recent discovery in China, go to “Underground Party.”

Categories: Blog

Sixteenth-Century Child Diagnosed With Hepatitis B

Archaeology News - January 6, 2018

HAMILTON, CANADA—Hendrik Poinar of McMaster University and Edward Holmes of the University of Sydney led an international team of scientists who have sequenced the complete genome of a strain of hepatitis B dating back hundreds of years, according to a report in The Star. They obtained the sample of the virus from the naturally mummified body of a two-year-old girl kept in the sacristy of the Basilica of Saint Domenico Maggiore in Naples, Italy. It had been thought the child had died of smallpox, due to the rash-like scars on her face and body. When the researchers failed to find any genetic evidence of smallpox in the samples of the child’s skin and bone, they looked for a genetic match with other disease-causing organisms. The test results suggest she may have suffered from Gianotti-Crosti syndrome, a rare childhood disease that can follow hepatitis B infection. “That’s a rash that breaks out extensively on children and it can cause death,” Poinar said. The scientists also found that the sixteenth-century strain of hepatitis B virus differed very little from modern-day iterations of the virus. For more, go to “Diagnosis of Ancient Illness.”

Categories: Blog

Paper Fragments Recovered From Blackbeard’s Cannon

Archaeology News - January 6, 2018

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA—The Salisbury Post reports that 16 tiny scraps of paper have been recovered from a mass of sludge found in a breech-loading cannon on Queen Anne’s Revenge, the flagship of the pirate Blackbeard, by the conservators at the Queen Anne’s Revenge Conservation Lab. Printed text was discerned on a few of the scraps, the largest of which measures about the size of a quarter. Researchers determined the paper came from a 1712 first edition of the book A Voyage to the South Sea, and Round the World, Perform’d in the Years 1708, 1709, 1710, and 1711, written by Captain Edward Cooke. Such voyage narratives were popular reading at the time. In the book, Cooke described his trip on an expedition on the Duke and the Dutchess, two ships that sailed from Bristol, England, in 1708 under the command of Captain Woodes Rogers. Scholars have found references in the historical record to the fact that there were books aboard the vessels in Blackbeard’s fleet, but no specific titles were mentioned. The newly discovered paper fragments offer the first-known clue to the pirates' reading habits. To read about another discovery on the Queen Anne's Revenge, go to “Medicine on the High Seas.”

Categories: Blog

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