Turkish Soldier’s Grave Found at Gallipoli

Archaeology News - February 3, 2017

ÇANAKKALE, TURKEY—The grave of a Turkish soldier named Sergeant Mehmet, who was killed during World War I's Battle of Gallipoli, was found during a landscaping project conducted by the Gallipoli Site Management Directorate, according to a report in The Daily Sabah. The Battle of Gallipoli was fought by around a million soldiers between April 25, 1915, and January 9, 1916, when the Allies attempted to invade Constantinople, the capital of the Ottoman Empire. Tens of thousands were killed. Sergeant Mehmet’s grave was found in an area that had been the site of a military hospital and graveyard during the eight-month-long battle. His tombstone, inscribed in Arabic, had been covered with vegetation. A new stone translates the dedication into modern Turkish. For more on archaeology at the Gallipoli battlefield, go to “Letter from Turkey: Anzac's Next Chapter.”

Categories: Blog

Neolithic House Unearthed in Abu Dhabi

Archaeology News - February 3, 2017

MARAWAH ISLAND, ABU DHABI—According to a report in The National, the foundations of a 7,500-year-old, three-room house with 30-inch-thick walls has been found on an island off the coast of Abu Dhabi. “It’s a stunning find because there are no parallels to it anywhere else in the Gulf coast region,” said Mark Beech, head of coastal heritage at Abu Dhabi’s Tourism and Culture Authority. He said the Neolithic dwelling had walls that projected into the backyard to create a space for cooking that is similar to what is found in traditional Arabian houses. The structure was found in the smallest of seven mounds at the site. Beech thinks that the rest of the mounds could hold the remains of a village, where the residents herded sheep and goats, and also fished. Stone tools, beads made from shells, and a shark’s tooth have also been recovered. A ceramic jar made in what is now Iraq suggests that the residents engaged in long-distance trade. For more on archaeology in the area, go to “Archaeology Island.”

Categories: Blog

Royal Scribe’s 3,000-Year-Old Tomb Discovered in Luxor

Archaeology News - February 3, 2017

SHINJUKU, JAPAN—Seeker reports that a team led by Jiro Kondo of Waseda University was working in Luxor, in the forecourt of the tomb of the royal scribe Userhat, when they discovered a hole leading to a previously unknown chamber. Hieroglyphics identified the chamber as the tomb of Khonsu, another royal scribe. The style of the tomb’s paintings suggests that it dates to between 1292 and 1069 B.C. A picture of four baboons adoring the solar boat of the sun god Ra-Atum had been carved on the chamber’s north wall. Baboons were associated with wisdom, science, and measurement, are believed to have been spiritual muses of scribes, and are also linked to Ra-Atum, perhaps because they warm themselves in the morning sun, and make noise when the sun rises. Baboons are not native to Egypt, but are thought to have been imported from Nubia as pets. Their morning calls may have also served as alarm clocks. Images on another section of wall depict Khonsu and his wife worshipping Osiris and Isis. Illustrations of two ram-headed deities, perhaps Khnum or Khnum-Re, are also present. For more, go to “A Pharaoh’s Last Fleet.”

Categories: Blog

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