Databases and other Electronic Resources

Abzu is a guide to networked open access data relevant to the study and public presentation of the Ancient Near East and the Ancient Mediterranean world.

Databases and other Electronic Resources

This site contains information about the prehistoric archaeology of the Aegean. Through a series of lessons and illustrations, it traces the cultural evolution of humanity in the Aegean basin from the era of hunting and gathering (Palaeolithic-Mesolithic) through the early village farming stage (Neolithic) and the formative period of Aegean civilization into the age of the great palatial cultures of Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece.

Databases and other Electronic Resources

The AJA launched a student section on its website. This area is a starting point for research, a place to learn about a career in archaeology or about submitting your first academic article, and a collection of helpful, trusted links to archaeological material. Start exploring at www.ajaonline.org/students.

Databases and other Electronic Resources

The ascsa.net digital library currently provides access to the archaeological data from the Athenian Agora and Corinth together with a selection of photographs from the Alison Frantz Collection that pertain to these excavations. Searches can be made across these collections or they can be queried separately. Publications, excavation reports, excavation notebooks, contexts, objects, plans and drawings, and photos and other images can be searched using the Agora or Corinth field names, as well as the Dublin Core metadata standard set. Users can tailor the display of their search results in many formats such as list, icons (thumbnail), and table. The table display format is especially flexible with individual fields specified by the user. Find spots for objects from the Athenian Agora and from the recent Panayia Field excavations in Corinth can be plotted in Google Earth or on excavation plans (Agora only at present). Search results may also be exported into four file formats.

Databases and other Electronic Resources

Beazley can be used to search individual databases or a combination. 

Databases and other Electronic Resources

CEFAEL (Publications en ligne) posts on-line the Hellenic Correspondence Bulletin, and the whole of the monographs, thus offering the public the opportunity to consult a whole of about 250.000 pages, a collection that is expected to evolve.

Databases and other Electronic Resources

Since its founding in 1881, the American School of Classical Studies at Athens has amassed a huge collection of both published and unpublished information. This includes books, journals, photographs, excavation notebooks, personal papers, maps, and scientific data sets. One of the major initiatives of the School in recent years has been to digitize these resources into an ASCSA Digital Library, which is actually a collection of several databases either administered directly by the School or in conjunction with other institutions. This page provides a central point of access to these major digital resources. ASCSA Multimedia Presentations AMBROSIA: The Union Catalogue of the Libraries ASCSA.net: Interdepartmental Database of the Agora and Corinth Excavations Alison Frantz Photographic Collection Archaeological Photographic Collection Dorothy Burr Thompson Collection Historical Archives of the Gennadius Library Scrapbooks of John (Joannes) Gennadius Mapping Mediterranean Lands

Databases and other Electronic Resources

An indispensible tool for researchers in all disciplines who wish to learn about the latest archaeological discoveries in Greece and Cyprus, Archaeology in Greece Online/Chronique des fouilles en ligne is a richly illustrated topographical database with a mapping feature to locate field projects within sites and regions.

Databases and other Electronic Resources

Electronic Tools and Ancient Near Eastern Archives ETANA is a cooperative project of: American Oriental Society | American Schools of Oriental Research | Case Western Reserve University | Cobb Institute of Archaeology at Mississippi State | Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, New York University | International Association for Assyriology | Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago | Society of Biblical Literature | Sonia and Marco Nadler Institute of Archaeology of Tel Aviv University | State University of New York at Stony Brook | Vanderbilt University | Virginia Polytechnic and State University

Databases and other Electronic Resources

The FAIMS Project is a community-driven, e-research initiative based at Macquarie University (Sydney, Australia) that develops digital tools for archaeology. Our flagship product is the FAIMS Mobile Platform, an open-source Android mobile application for recording structured, free text, multimedia, and geospatial data under by individuals or teams working under difficult field conditions. The FAIMS Mobile Platform can be deeply customised to accommodate a wide range of archaeological activities, while still promoting the creation of compatible datasets. We have partnerships with major archaeological data services (e.g., Open Context, tDAR, OCHRE, Heurist), allowing data to be easily exported to any of these platforms, or data can be exported to desktop spreadsheet, database, and GIS software. 

Databases and other Electronic Resources

Maintained by the Associazione Internazionale di Archeologia Classica (AIAC), Fasti Online offers two web components of interest to Mediterranean archaeology. One is a searchable, geographically organized database of current Mediterranean fieldwork. At present, the majority of content relates to fieldwork in Italy. The other component of the site is a peer-reviewed venue FOLD&R (Fasti Online Documents and Research) for offering short field reports. At present, the geographic scope of the content includes Italy and Bulgaria.

Databases and other Electronic Resources

Project Troia, the joint University of Cincinnati and University of Tuebingen excavations at Ilion, as the site was known in the Greek and Roman periods, has cataloged a great variety of ceramic finds. This digital publication is a guide to the Greek through Byzantine ceramics found at the site. It consists of catalogs that illustrate items from the Geometric through Byzantine periods, including decorated finewares, slipped tablewares, utilitarian vessels and lamps and transport amphoras. By date, the material spans from the early Iron Age in the tenth century BC to the late fifteenth century AD, when a small Byzantine settlement was finally abandoned. The largest gap is from the early seventh through thirteenth centuries, when the city lay largely abandoned following decline that set in after an early sixth century earthquake. As material is added, the catalogs will become a comprehensive resource for the study of pottery from Ilion. When available, high-resolution images and profile drawings accompany catalog entries. 

Databases and other Electronic Resources

Digital publication of inscriptions from Aphrodisias in SW Turkey. The aim of this project is to build on the experience gained on the EPAPP project.

Databases and other Electronic Resources

The Manar al-Athar open-access photo-archive http://www.manar-al-athar.ox.ac.uk (based at the University of Oxford) aims to provide high resolution, searchable images, freely-downloadable for teaching, research, heritage projects, and publication. It covers buildings and art in the areas of the former Roman empire which later came under Islamic rule (e.g. Syro-Palestine/the Levant, Arabia, Egypt, and North Africa), from ca. 300 BC to the present, but especially Roman, late antique, and early Islamic art, architecture, and sacred sites.

Many of the monuments are now inaccessible to the West making this archive an important long-term resource for research, with downloadable high resolution images which are not watermarked. The records of monuments which are damaged or destroyed will also play a vital role in future restoration. Low resolution copies of these photographs for Powerpoint make them readily suitable for classroom use and demonstrating the shared heritage of the regions covered and the West. The images download with the caption, etc. and credit line in the metadata.

The archive has over 17,000 images already online, as of September 2015. Material is labelled in both English and Arabic to facilitate regional use, with the main instructions also available in some other languages.

 

Databases and other Electronic Resources

Useful links related to the archaeology of the Mediterranean basin.

Databases and other Electronic Resources

Open Context is a web-based publisher of open access archaeological data contributed by scholars. Open Context reviews, edits, and publishes archaeological research data sets and archives them with university-backed repositories, including the California Digital Library.Open Context's data publications can complement and enhance conventional publications through comprehensive dissemination and preservation of rich digital data and media. 

Databases and other Electronic Resources

Pleiades gives scholars, students and enthusiasts worldwide the ability to use, create and share historical geographic information about the Greek and Roman World in digital form. Pleiades is a joint project of the Ancient World Mapping Center, the Stoa Consortium and the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World. It is supported by its institutional partners, and by the U.S. National Endowment for the Humanities. Editorial Board: Senior Editors: Roger Bagnall and Richard Talbert Managing Editors: Tom Elliott and Brian Turner Associate Editor: Michael McCormick Chief Engineer: Sean Gillies

Databases and other Electronic Resources

The Digital Archaeological Record (tDAR) is an international digital archive and repository that houses data about archaeological investigations, research, resources, and scholarship. tDAR provides researchers new avenues to discover and integrate information relevant to topics they are studying. Users can search tDAR for digital documents, data sets, images, GIS files, and other data resources from archaeological projects spanning the globe.

Databases and other Electronic Resources

Museum Collections

The new Acropolis Museum has a total area of 25,000 square meters, with exhibition space of over 14,000 square meters, ten times more than that of the old museum on the Hill of the Acropolis. The new Museum offers all the amenities expected in an international museum of the 21st century.

Museum Collections

Search over 500,000 records of coins and related items.

Museum Collections

The Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki is a state museum of the Ministry of Culture and has been an autonomous unit since 2001. It has been housed in a building, designed by architect Patroklos Karantinos since 1962 and it has been designated as a listed monument of modern heritage, as it is one of the most representative examples of architectural modernism in Greece. Its collections include artifacts and assemblages from excavations conducted since 1912 by the Greek Antiquities Service throughout Macedonia. The museum also houses objects that used to be part of private collections and were later donated to it.
 

 

 

 

Museum Collections

The Epigraphical Museum is unique in Greece and the largest of its kind in the world. It safeguards 13,510, mostly Greek, inscriptions, which cover the period from early historical times to the Late Roman period, primarily in Greece. The museum is housed in the south wing ground floor of the National Archaeological Museum. It comprises an internal and external courtyard (atrium), a lobby, eleven rooms, a large hypostyle Pi-shaped corridor, a gallery, offices, a laboratory for the conservation of inscribed stone monuments and lavatories. Only the courtyards, lobby and four rooms are open to the public; the other premisces are accessible only to researchers and staff.

Museum Collections

Thematic and alphabetical listings of State archaeological museums and private collections in Greece.

Museum Collections

The Herakleion Archaeological Museum is one of the largest and most important museums in Greece, and among the most important museums in Europe. It houses representative artefacts from all the periods of Cretan prehistory and history, covering a chronological span of over 5,500 years from the Neolithic period to Roman times. The singularly important Minoan collection contains unique examples of Minoan art, many of them true masterpieces. The Herakleion Museum is rightly considered as the museum of Minoan culture par excellence worldwide.

Museum Collections

The Kelsey Museum houses a collection of nearly 100,000 ancient and medieval objects from the civilizations of the Mediterranean and the Near East in the new state-of-the-art William E. Upjohn Exhibit Wing. The Kelsey also offers special exhibitions that change periodically. In addition to mounting exhibitions, the Museum sponsors research, educational programs for children, and fieldwork projects, as well as housing the Interdepartmental Program in Classical Art and Archaeology.

Museum Collections

The Carlos maintains the largest collection of ancient art in the Southeast with objects from ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome, the Near East, and the ancient Americas. The Museum is also home to collections of nineteenth- and twentieth-century sub-Saharan African art and European and American works on paper from the Renaissance to the present day.

Museum Collections

The Museum's massive archaeological collection results from federally mandated cultural resource management projects and myriad projects conducted by university faculty and students. The Museum has also long functioned as a repository for collections donated by members of the Missouri Archaeological Society, as well as for other personal archaeological collections. The majority of the Museum's archaeological holdings are managed by the American Archaeology Division's Curation office. In addition to the Missouri material, the Museum also holds small collections of archaeological material from other states and regions of the world, type and teaching collections, and the renowned Eichenberger collection of expert replicas of many of the world's most significant archaeological pieces.

Museum Collections

The Museum's antiquities collection includes objects representing the major cultures of the ancient Mediterranean world. While Greek and Roman art are the collection's emphasis, ancient Egypt and the ancient Near East are also significantly represented. The collection contains about 8,000 objects; only about 5% of the collection is on display at any given time. The remainder is carefully stored, and objects are brought out periodically for study and temporary exhibitions. Particular strengths in the Greek and Roman collections include approximately 3,000 coins, and a significant number of lamps, glass objects (mostly vessels), Greek and South Italian pottery, terracotta sculpture, and small bronzes. A growing collection of stone sculpture is represented by Roman funerary monuments, portraits of the emperors Nero and Hadrian, and one of an unidentified third-century empress. The antiquities collection also includes substantial holdings representing the cultures of Egypt, Anatolia, Mesopotamia, Iran, Palestine, and Cyprus. Iranian artifacts are particularly strong in pottery and Luristan bronzes. A number of pottery vessels from the early Hacilar and Yortan cultures strengthen the Anatolian collection. The Museum's interest in the archaeology of Cyprus has led to the acquisition of a fine collection of Cypriot pottery. A painted linen mummy shroud, plaster mummy masks, a Coptic tunic, a collection of Coptic textile fragments, and an exquisite agate bowl are exceptional examples from the Egyptian holdings. Finally, over 900 objects from the Palestinian region attest the Museum's long-standing connections with the archaeology of that area.

Museum Collections

Το Μουσείο Βυζαντινού Πολιτισμού, από τα πιο σύγχρονα μουσεία στην Ελλάδα, προσφέρει μια ολοκληρωμένη εικόνα του Βυζαντινού πολιτισμού μέσα από τις πρωτότυπες εκθέσεις και την πολυσχιδή δραστηριότητα του. Σκοπός του είναι η συγκέντρωση, προστασία, μελέτη και προβολή έργων τέχνης και αντικειμένων, που καλύπτουν χρονολογικά την παλαιοχριστιανική, βυζαντινή και μεταβυζαντινή περίοδο. Τα έργα που φυλάσσονται και προβάλλονται στους χώρους του προέρχονται από το γεωγραφικό χώρο της Μακεδονίας και ιδιαίτερα από τη Θεσσαλονίκη, το πιο σημαντικό κέντρο στο ευρωπαϊκό τμήμα της βυζαντινής αυτοκρατορίας μετά την Κωνσταντινούπολη.

Museum Collections

The Museum of Cycladic Art is dedicated to the study and promotion of ancient cultures of the Aegean and Cyprus, with special emphasis on Cycladic Art of the 3rd millennium BC. It was founded in 1986, to house the collection of Nicholas and Dolly Goulandris. Since then it has grown in size to accommodate new acquisitions, obtained either through direct purchases or through donations by important collectors and institutions. Today, in the galleries of the MCA the visitor can approach three major subjects: Cycladic culture; ancient Greek art; and Cypriot culture.

Museum Collections

Founded in 1866, the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology is one of the oldest museums in the world devoted to anthropology and houses one of the most comprehensive records of human cultural history in the Western Hemisphere.

Museum Collections

The National Archaeological Museum is the largest museum in Greece and one of the world's great museums. Although its original purpose was to secure all the finds from the nineteenth century excavations in and around Athens, it gradually became the central National Archaeological Museum and was enriched with finds from all over Greece. Its abundant collections, with more than 11,000 exhibits, provide a panorama of Greek civilization from the beginnings of Prehistory to Late Antiquity.

Museum Collections

The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, through its research, collections, exhibitions, and educational programming, advances understanding of the world's cultural heritage. Founded in 1887, Penn Museum has conducted more than 400 archaeological and anthropological expeditions around the world. Three gallery floors feature materials from Egypt, Mesopotamia, the Bible Lands, Mesoamerica, Asia and the ancient Mediterranean World, as well as artifacts from native peoples of the Americas, Africa and Polynesia. With an active exhibition schedule, a membership program, and educational programming for children and adults, Penn Museum offers the public an opportunity to share in the ongoing discovery of humankind's collective heritage.

Museum Collections

The establishment of the Division of Anthropology at the Yale Peabody Museum in 1902 by George Grant MacCurdy brought together the Museum’s archaeological, ethnological and physical anthropology collections under a single authority. Since then, through the University’s scientific expeditions and donations from Yale alumni and friends, the holdings of the Division have grown to over 280,000 catalogued lots.

Museum Collections

The Yale University Art Gallery stimulates active learning about art and the creative process through research, teaching, and dialogue among communities of Yale students, faculty, artists, scholars, alumni, and the wider public. The Gallery organizes exhibitions and educational programs to offer enjoyment and encourage inquiry, while building and maintaining its collections in trust for future generations. It holds a substantial collection of ancient objects, including material from Yale's excavations at Dura Europos.

Museum Collections

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

An archaeological site  located in the northeastern Mediterranean region of the Republic of Turkey in the state of Hatay. 

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives
Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The Amheida project was started at Columbia University in 2001. Since 2008, New York University is the primary sponsoring institution, with Columbia University continuing as a partner in the project. The excavations at Amheida collaborate with other participating groups in the Dakhleh Oasis Project, an international venture now three decades old dedicated to studying the interaction between human settlement and the environment over the long span from the earliest human presence in the oasis to modern times. Amheida itself has remains spanning nearly three millennia, and paleolithic material is found along its fringes.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Amorium is the longest ongoing British excavation ever conducted in Turkey. Work at Amorium started in 1987 under the directorship of the late Prof. R. Martin Harrison of the University of Oxford. There have been field seasons every year since (with the exception of 1999, and 2010–2012), making a total of 22 years to date. The team of archaeologists, surveyors, conservators, and students that works at Amorium is very international. In recent years, for example, there have been as many as 40 team members from 10 different countries, and all of them participated in a single integrated programme of work.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

New York University Excavations at Aphrodisias, which began in 1961, are sponsored by the Institute of Fine Arts in cooperation with the Faculty of Arts & Science with invaluable support from private individuals and the following groups of friends of the project: the American Friends of Aphrodisias (President, Nina Köprülü); the Aphrodisias Sevenler Dernegi in Izmir (President, Lise Sur); the Friends of Aphrodisias Trust in London (President, Lady Patricia Daunt); the Association des Amis d'Aphrodisias in Paris (President, Christian Le Roy; Vice-Presidents, Nathalie de Chaisemartin and Pascale Linant de Bellefonds); and the Geyre Vakfi in Istanbul (President, Ömer Koç)

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

This notebook hopes to give life again to that spirit of knowledge-at-everybody's-reach, so often professed by Linda Schele, and intends to fill some of the void left by her departure. Not unlike the The Copan Notes and the notebooks for the workshops at the University of Texas, this manual does not pretend to be "the final and definitive work" on the Copan monuments. Instead, it is hoped that it will be a flexible, didactic instrument which will allow for corrections and modifications, as knowledge advances, and which may promote dialogue and interchange among those interested. It is an effort to collect information dispersed in many places and reflect an educated opinion about the current knowledge of the decipherment and interpretation of these monuments. We hope that it will be available both to the scholar and those that are just curious so that we may all enjoy it. Click here to read more about the Manual of the Monuments of Copán, Honduras, edited by Ricardo Agurcia Fasquelle and Vito Véliz.  Available in Spanish or English.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The American School of Classical Studies has been excavating in the area of the Athenian Agora since 1931, bringing to light the history of the area over a period of 5000 years. Finds range from scattered pieces of pottery of the late Neolithic period (ca. 3000 BC) to the contents of 19th and early 20th century basements. The Agora of the 5th and 4th centuries BC has been the main focus of attention. Scholars have identified the often scanty material remains on the basis of ancient references to the Agora as the center of civic activity of ancient Athens. Public documents inscribed on stone, weight and measure standards, and jurors’ identification tickets and ballots reflect the administrative nature of the site, while traces of private dwellings in the area immediately bordering the open square, with their household pottery and other small finds, throw light on the everyday lives of Athenian citizens.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

A collaborative research project in north-central Anatolia. 

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The Azoria Project is the excavation of an Early Iron Age and Archaic (ca. 1200-480 B.C.) site on the island of Crete in the Greek Aegean.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Excavations at Burgaz.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The Butrint Foundation aimed to use modern field methods to understand the history of Butrint and its region in its Mediterranean context. The archaeological programme has comprised three phases: first, defining the character and extent of Butrint’s archaeology; second, selecting areas for selective large-scale investigation; and, third, preparing the results for publication, archiving and ordered storage at the site.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük was first discovered in the late 1950s and excavated by James Mellaart between 1961 and 1965. The site rapidly became famous internationally due to the large size and dense occupation of the settlement, as well as the spectacular wall paintings and other art that was uncovered inside the houses. Since 1993 an international team of archaeologists, led by Ian Hodder, has been carrying out new excavations and research, in order to shed more light on the people that inhabited the site.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Der "Central Anatolian Neolithic E-Workshop" (kurz: CANeW) war ein archäologisches Online-Projekt im Internet, welches sich mit den spezifischen Fragen zur Vorgeschichte Zentralanatoliens befasste. Der Workshop bestand aus einer sog. internationalen "Table Ronde" die am 23. und 24. November 2001 in Istanbul (Türkei) abgehalten wurde.
 

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The Central Lydia Archaeological Survey (CLAS) is a Boston University research project directed by Christopher H. Roosevelt and Christina Luke.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

A research center in  Klazomenai.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Excavations by the American School of Classical Studies at Athens began in 1896 and have continued with little interruption until today. Restricted by the modern village of Old Corinth, which directly overlies the ancient city, the main focus of School investigations has been on the area surrounding the mid-6th century B.C. Temple of Apollo. This dominating monument has been one of the only features of the site visible since antiquity.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

An interdisciplinary project of survey in East Lokris and excavation at Halai, a small ancient town in Opuntian Lokris, situated hard on the eastern shore of the bay referred to by Strabo (9.4.2) as the Opuntian Gulf and called in modern times the bay of Atalanti.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Excavations and research at Ephesos. 

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Gordion is one of the most important sites of the ancient world. It is known primarily as the political and cultural capital of the Phrygians, a people who dominated much of central Anatolia during the early first millennium BCE. With its monumental Phrygian architecture, an extensive destruction level dating to around 800 BCE, and a series of wealthy tombs belonging to Phrygian royalty and other elites, Gordion is the premier archaeological type-site for Phrygian civilization. As such, it is on a par with Athens, Rome, Pompeii, the Hittite capital at Hattusha, and Babylon in elucidating for us the material achievements of an ancient civilization.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Unprovenanced objects and forgeries

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Hasanlu Tepe is a large, mounded archaeological site in the Azarbaijan Province of northwestern Iran near the southern shore of Lake Urmia. 

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Hattusas/Boğazköy is an investigation of Hittite Culture in the former capital of the Hittite kingdom. 

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The archaeological programme aims at increasing the knowledge of the settlement through both archaeological excavations, surveys, and the use of new technologies (e.g. geophysical survey, GIS, remote sensing, etc.). 

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives
Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Excavations carried out at Kerkenes. 

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The Kinet Höyük project is examining the economic subsistence strategies of a small eastern Mediterranean harbor over a long chronological perspective.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Ancient city located about 70 km south of Rhodes. 

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Kythera Island Project (KIP) is an inter-disciplinary research programme that investigates the long-term cultural and natural dynamics of insularity on the Aegean island of Kythera, Greece.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives
Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Labraunda is the home of the Sanctuary of Zeus Labraundos and is located 14 km from the modern town of Milas, in southwestern Turkey.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Limyra ist eine Stadt des lykischen Bundes, die neben den üblichen Ruinen - Theater, Agora, Stadtmauer, byzantinische Kirche - vor allem mehrere Nekropolen aufzuweisen hat, von denen vor allem die westliche wirklich bemerkenswert ist. Der komplette Berghang ist übersät mit Felsgräbern, die auch bestens ausgestattet sein sollen. Da der Hang aber recht steil ist und auf Grund seiner Lage praktisch den ganzen Tag in der prallen Sonne liegt und außer den Grabkammern keinerlei schattige Stellen aufzuweisen hat, haben wir es trotz zweier Besuche (1988 und 2002) nicht weiter als bis zu den ersten Gräbern geschafft.
Auf der Höhe des Berges liegt noch eine Akropolis mit den Grundmauern eines Heroons, über die ich mir aber aus dem gleichen Grund kein Urteil erlauben kann. Der Aufstieg soll laut Reiseführer ohne Pause ca. 45 Minuten beanspruchen

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

An excavation of Magnesia carried out by Ankara University. 

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The Maya Research Program is a U.S.-based non-profit organization (501C3) that sponsors archaeological and ethnographic research in Middle America. Each summer since 1992, we have sponsored archaeological fieldwork at the ancient Maya site of Blue Creek in northwestern Belize and ethnographic research in the village of Yaxunah, Mexico. The Maya Research Program is affiliated with the University of Texas at Tyler. A key MRP goal is to encourage the participation of students and volunteers -- anyone who wants to experience the real world of archaeological or anthropological research and understand how we learn about other cultures may join us. We see this as a critical educational component of MRP's work, and it helps us accomplish our research goals as well! The ages of our participants range from 18 to over 80. So many of our participants return year after year that MRP has become an extended family. About half of our participants are university students under 30 years old and the other half are professionals and retirees. While the majority of participants come from the United States and Canada, we have students from Australian, European, Latin American, and Japanese institutions as well. For students, academic credit can usually be arranged. While many students go on to careers in other fields, many go on to become successful graduate students in archaeology or a related field and return to focus on MRP projects for their theses and dissertations.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The Metaponto project is a study of the rural population in Classical Greek times (as well as its predecessors and successors). 

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The Metropolis Archaeological Excavations have been underway since 1990 on behalf of the Ministry of Culture and Tourism and Trakya University. The excavation team is led by Assistant Professor Serdar Aybek from the Trakya University Archeology Department. Excavations continue on public buildings and civil spaces, where clues to the life in Metropolis will be unearthed, while drilling continues so as to reveal new structures.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Excavations in Miletus carried out since 1988.  

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The Mochlos Excavation Project involves the cleaning and excavation of a number of related sites on the island of Mochlos and its adjacent coastal plain, located just east of the Bay of Mirabello in eastern Crete.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Stanford University joined the Monte Polizzo project in 1999, when Michael Shanks and Emma Blake brought a dozen Stanford students to Salemi, Sicily and began analysis of finds from the 1998 excavations. In 2000, Ian Morris began excavating on the acropolis with students from Stanford and other universities and volunteers from Salemi, Corleone, and Marsala. In 2001 Jennifer Trimble carried out a magnetometry survey, and by 2002 the acropolis excavation had become one of the largest archaeological projects in the west Mediterranean, with a staff of more than eighty people, drawn from the US, Italy, Canada, Britain, Spain, Germany, Sweden, and Norway. Stanford’s excavation is funded primarily by the Tressider Fund and the Undergraduate Research Projects program, directed by the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education. For more information, visit the Monte Polizzo Project website.
 

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Ecavations carried out at the ancient city of Morgantina. 

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Answering questions about the origins of Greek cult and Greek athletics are at the heart of the agenda of the Mt. Lykaion Excavation and Survey Project. Since 2004, the project has been working at the site of the Sanctuary of Zeus and since 2006 excavation has been underway.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The research design of the Mugello Valley Archaeological Project and Poggio Colla Field School combines excavation, land survey, and archaeometry as part of an interdisciplinary regional landscape analysis of the Etruscan site of Poggio Colla and the surrounding area. The project seeks to contribute significantly to our understanding of Etruscan culture and to educate through a broad and innovative curriculum a new generation of archaeologists in the practice and theory of settlement archaeology. Through timely publication and a broad program of education and outreach the project will explicate and increase awareness of the ethical management of an endangered cultural heritage.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Excavations carried out at the citadel of Mycenae. 

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Kentin ilk olarak İ.Ö. 2. binde Palaimindos adı ile Lelegler tarafından kurulduğu tahmin edilmektedir. Strabon’un rivayet ettiğine göre Myndos, Bodrum Yarımadası üzerinde kurulan 8 Leleg kentinden birisidir. Diğer Leleg kentleri: Termera, Side, Madnasa, Padasa, Uranium, Telmessos ve Theangela/ Syangela’dır. Yine Strabon’a göre, Karia Satrabı Mausolos İ.Ö. 4. yüzyılın ortalarına doğru sekiz kentten altısını boşaltarak, buralarda yaşayan insanları zorla Halikarnassos’a yaşamaya mecbur bırakmıştır. Bu zorunlu göç esnasında Myndos’a dokunulmamış, hatta, kent Mausolos’un parasal yardımı ile o dönemin modern şehircilik anlayışına göre yeniden inşa edilerek, etrafı sur duvarı ile çevrilmiştir. Palaimindos olarak adlandırılan eski kentin Kocadağ olarak adlandırılan Yarımada üzerinde kurulu olduğu tahmin edilmektedir. Günümüze kadar ulaşan kentin büyük bir bölümü Mausolos tarafından kurulan yeni kente aittir. Bununla birlikte Roma İmparatorluk çağında da büyük eklemelerin söz konusu olduğu tahmin edilmektedir.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Archaeological research (includes excavation and study) of material and monuments from the ancient site.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Excavations conducted at Patara. 

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

An important Hellenistic-Roman city and royal seat: Investigation into the general organization of the Hellenistic city and settlements in the surroundings.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The overall aim of the excavations in and around this central Anatolian town was to reconstruct the urban development and urbanisation, especially between 700 BC and AD 1100.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Archaeological excavations of the Great Temple at Petra, Jordan. The excavation is currently directed by Brown University professor emerita Martha Sharp Joukowsky.  

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Excavations and research carried out in Priene. 

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Ecavations conducted at Sagalassos. 

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The Archaeological Exploration of Sardis, sponsored by the Harvard Art Museums and Cornell University, has been excavating at Sardis since 1958. The site has yielded artifacts from the Lydian, Persian, Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine, Ottoman, and other cultures. During the past 50 years more than 13,000 objects have been inventoried and many thousands more have been saved for future study.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The Sissi Archaeological Project (S.Ar.P.edon) is a collaboration of the French and Dutch speaking universities of Louvain/Leuven and operates in Greece under the auspices of the Belgian School of Athens (EBSA). This is perhaps the only pan-Belgian excavation abroad and the first time a site on Crete is excavated by the EBSA. Funds are generously provided by the Institute for Aegean Prehistory, the UCL and KULeuven, the FNRS and FWO, a series of private donors (see sponsors) as well as the local community of Vrachasi and Sissi. A first five-year programme of excavations took place between 2007 and 2011 and we are now studying the finds for publication.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Excavations at Smintheion. 

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives
Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The department of History Archaeology and Social Anthropology (IAKA) of the University of Thessaly excavations of the Archaic-Classical period sanctuary at Soros within the the municipality of Iolkos.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

An excavation, between 1999 and 2001, of a Classical Greek shipwreck off the Turkish coast at Tektas Burnu.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The Gabii Project was launched in 2007 with the objective of studying and excavating the ancient Latin city of Gabii, a city-state that was both a neighbor of, and a rival to, Rome in the first millennium BC.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The Gabii Project is an international archaeological initiative under the direction of Nicola Terrenato of the University of Michigan. It was launched in 2007 with the objective of studying and excavating the ancient Latin city of Gabii, a city-state that was both a neighbor of, and a rival to, Rome in the first millennium BC. Located in the region of Italy once known as Latium, the site of Gabii was occupied since at least the tenth century BC until its decline in the second and third centuries AD. Amazingly, in subsequent centuries the site of Gabii was never developed or even substantially occupied, nor has the urban area ever been the site of major, stratigraphic excavations. As such, the site provides a unique opportunity to study the development and structure of Archaic urban planning in Central Italy, both monumental and civic architecture, domestic space, and all other corollary studies. Since Gabii eventually became a part of the Roman Empire – first as a member of the Latin League and later as a town with municipal status - numerous important intersections exist between Gabii and Rome.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

 The Kenchreai Cemetery Project (2002-2006) was an interdisciplinary study of burial grounds at the eastern port of Corinth during the Roman Empire. This website summarizes the findings of the Kenchreai Cemetery Project. 

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Mitrou is a tidal islet in the bay of Atalanti in East Lokris, Greece. For most, if not all, of the Bronze Age, Mitrou was the largest and most important settlement of East Lokris, and it is in an excellent state of preservation.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The Nemea Valley Archaeological Project (NVAP) is sponsored by Bryn Mawr College and conducted fieldwork under the auspices of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens with permissions from the Ministry of Culture and Sciences of Greece.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives
Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The Pylos Regional Archaeological Project (PRAP) is a multi-disciplinary, diachronic archaeological expedition formally organized in 1990 to investigate the history of prehistoric and historic settlement and land use in western Messenia in Greece, in an area centered on the Bronze Age administrative center known as the Palace of Nestor.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The Sikyon survey project (University of Thessaly in collaboration with the 37th Ephoreia of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities) is a fully integrated multidisciplinary research program to study the human presence and activity on the plateau of ancient Sikyon, a city in northeastern Peloponnese between Corinth and Achaia.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The Sphakia Survey is an interdisciplinary archaeological project whose main objective is to reconstruct the sequence of human activity in a remote and rugged part of Crete (Greece), from the time that people arrived in the area, by ca 3000 BC, until the end of Ottoman rule in AD 1900.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The Nemea Center for Classical Archaeology, a research unit within the Department of Classics, founded in 2004, promotes teaching, research, and public service centered on the University of California excavations at Nemea, Greece and its surrounding region.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The Sanctuary of Poseidon on the Isthmus of Corinth became the major extramural shrine of the Corinthians, their most important religious foundation outside the city. It was one of four sanctuaries where Greeks from all parts of the Mediterranean came to compete in pan-Hellenic games. Oscar Broneer discovered the temple of Poseidon in 1952 and until 1967 conducted systematic excavations of the central plateau that contained the temple, altar, surrounding buildings, and a Roman hero shrine. He also cleared the theater, two caves used for dining, and two stadia for the Isthmian Games. In 1976, Elizabeth Gebhard succeeded Broneer as director of the University of Chicago Excavations at Isthmia. Efforts have been directed towards the final publication and conservation of objects recovered in Broneer’s excavations. In 1967, Paul A. Clement of University of California at Los Angeles undertook excavations in the Roman Bath and in the late antique fortress called the Hexamilion. After his death, he was succeeded in 1987 by Timothy Gregory of Ohio State University.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Excavations at Kommos. 

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Excavations at Tilmen Hoyuk took place between 1959 and 2005. 

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

In 1988, after a hiatus of 50 years, the excavations at Troy were once again resumed under the direction of Dr. Manfred Korfmann from the University of Tübingen, with the cooperation of Dr. Brian Rose from the Department of Classics at the University of Cincinnati. Every summer since then a large international group, composed of archaeologists as well as representatives of many other academic disciplines, has conducted excavations.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives
Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The Upper Tigris Archaeological Research Project (UTARP) was a multi-year archaeological excavation and survey project in the Upper Tigris River Valley of southeastern Anatolia.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The Villa Magna Project aims at the investigation by excavation and survey of a large imperial Roman villa known from letters of Marcus Aurelius and its estate, and the subsequent life of the site, its fortification in late antiquity and the creation of a monastery among the ruins in the 10th century. 

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Yeronisos, or "Sacred Island", is 12,000 square meters of calcareous rock rising dramatically from the swelling seas just off the coast of western Cyprus. Since 1990 it has been the extraordinary setting for a total island study undertaken by Professor Joan Breton Connelly and the Yeronisos Island Expedition for New York University. The project pioneers the integration of ecological and archaeological fieldwork toward the common goal of preserving natural and cultural resources.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

The Neubauer Expedition to Zincirli is an archaeological project of the University of Chicago’s Oriental Institute

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Each summer, a research team of twenty-five to thirty archaeologists have worked at Ziyaret Tepe conducting excavations, geophysical surveys, artifact conservation, and specialist studies. Extensive preliminary reports of our work have been published regularly and many specialist studies are also available for scholars studying the ancient Near East in general, and the Assyrians in particular.

Excavations, Surveys, and other Research Initiatives

Bibliographies

This site contains information about the prehistoric archaeology of the Aegean. Through a series of lessons and illustrations, it traces the cultural evolution of humanity in the Aegean basin from the era of hunting and gathering (Palaeolithic-Mesolithic) through the early village farming stage (Neolithic) and the formative period of Aegean civilization into the age of the great palatial cultures of Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece.

Bibliographies

The On-line Union Catalogue of the Blegen and Gennadius Libraries of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens and the Libraries of the British School at Athens.

Bibliographies

Search over 300,000 records from the MFA.

Bibliographies

Nestor is an international bibliography of Aegean studies, Homeric society, Indo-European linguistics, and related fields. It is published monthly from September to May (each volume covers one calendar year) by the Department of Classics, University of Cincinnati. An Authors Index accompanies the December issue. Nestor is distributed in 30 countries world-wide. It is currently edited by Carol R. Hershenson. The primary geographic nexus of Nestor is the Aegean, including all of Greece, Albania, and Cyprus, the southern area of Bulgaria, and the western and southern areas of Turkey. Nestor includes publications concerning the central and western Mediterranean, southeastern Europe, the eastern Mediterranean, western Asia, and other regions of archaeological research, if the specific bibliographic items contain Aegean artifacts, imitations, or influences, or make reference to Aegean comparanda.

Bibliographies

Articles on the MH period published by members of the project team, and by scholars collaborating with the project. Also included is unpublished work (e.g. dissertations) as well as forthcoming articles; articles that have appeared in the periodical Hydra, published by Gullög Nordquist and Carol Zerner between 1985 and 1994.

Bibliographies

The DAI compiles some of the most important bibliographies on archaeology: Archaeological Bibliography, Bibliography of the Archaeology of the Iberian Peninsula, Subject catalogue of the Roman-German Commission, and Bibliography of the Archaeology of Eurasia (completed bibliography). You are able to search through the Archaeological Bibliography free of charge at the website of the DAI. The Archaeological Bibliography is expanded daily by the departments in Rome, Athens, Istanbul and the head office in Berlin, and it comprises titles collected since 1956 (approx. 400,000 titles). As a result of the involvement of the Athens and Istanbul departments in compiling the bibliography (since spring 2006), considerably more Greek and Turkish journals and monographs have been described and made available for research, in view of the holdings of those libraries.

Bibliographies

On-line Discussion Groups and Blogs

Discussion list for the Aegean Bronze Age. 

On-line Discussion Groups and Blogs

AWBG is a place for posts and discussion about blogging the Ancient World. Particularly welcome are entries announcing real world events where bloggers can meet, planning and notice of virtual blogfests - when a group of bloggers are posting about the same topic, and other issues related to how bloggers go about their business.

On-line Discussion Groups and Blogs

The primary focus of the project is to notice and comment on open access material relating to the ancient world.

On-line Discussion Groups and Blogs

ANE 2: A discussion list for the study of the Ancient Near East. A successor to the Ancient Near East Discussion List originally hosted by the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago. ANE 2 is a moderated academic discussion list that focuses on topics and issues of interest in Ancient Near Eastern Studies, from the Indus to the Nile, and from the beginnings of human habitation to the rise of Islam. It is intended to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas on these topics between and among scholars and students actively engaged in research and study of the Ancient Near East. 

On-line Discussion Groups and Blogs

Discussion of the archaeological ethics surrounding the collecting of antiquities. A trove of information, run by David Gill (Swansea).

On-line Discussion Groups and Blogs

Items of interest in the study and publication of ceramics from the Mediterranean world, along with other observations. 

On-line Discussion Groups and Blogs

This site provides information on the Persepolis Fortification Archive project based at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago.

On-line Discussion Groups and Blogs

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The mission of the American Academy in Rome, founded in 1894, is to foster the pursuit of advanced research and independent study in the fine arts and humanities.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The ANS is the preeminent national institution advancing the study and appreciation of coins, medals and related objects of all cultures as historical and artistic documents. It maintains the foremost numismatic collection and library, and supports scholarly research and publications, and sponsors educational and interpretive programs for diverse audiences.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The American Research Institute in Turkey (ARIT) is a non-profit educational institution dedicated to promoting North American and Turkish research and exchanges related to Turkey in all fields of the humanities and social sciences. ARIT provides support for these scholarly endeavors by maintaining research centers in Istanbul and Ankara, and by administering programs of fellowships to support research in Turkey at doctoral and advanced research levels. The range of research encompassed by American research in Turkey reflects the cultural richness of Turkey itself. From the Old Stone Age to the present, Turkey presents numerous opportunities for research in archaeology, architecture and art history, historical, textual, and archival studies, linguistics, literature, musicology, religion, anthropology, political science, sociology, and interdisciplinary studies.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The American Research Institute of the South Caucasus (ARISC), a non-profit American Overseas Research Center,  encourages and supports scholarly study of the South Caucasus states (Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia) across all disciplines of the Humanities, Sciences, and Social Sciences, including archaeological and cultural heritage projects.   ARISC promotes and encourages American research in the region and fosters intellectual inquiry across boundaries within the South Caucasus as well as between the South Caucasus and its neighbors. ARISC supports conferences, fellowships, publications, and teaching resources for use both in the United States and in the host countries where the Institute is located, and encourages other forms of cooperation.  ARISC  has local representatives in Yerevan, Baku and Tbilisi, who serve to facilitate research and nurture scholarly ties between institutions and individuals.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

Founded in 1881, The American School of Classical Studies provides graduate students and scholars from affiliated North American college and universities a base for the advanced study of all aspects of Greek culture, from antiquity to the present day. It also contributes considerably to the dissemination of information about Greek history and archaeology to the Greek public, as well as to the international and Greek scholarly communities.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The mission of the Archaeological Research Facility (ARF) is to encourage and carry out archaeological field and laboratory research conducted by U.C. Berkeley archaeologists and related specialists. As a field of research, archaeology is inherently interdisciplinary and collaborative; not only are there intimate research collaborations among natural scientists, social scientists and/or humanities scholars, but archaeology is practiced by scholars who expectedly hold faculty and/or research positions in a variety of departments, ranging from Classics to Earth and Planetary Science.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

An independent learned society, the Archaeological Society assists the Greek State in its work of protecting, improving and studying Greek antiquities. Whenever necessary, it undertakes the management and execution of large projects: this has happened with the excavations in Macedonia and Thrace in recent years and with the large-scale restoration projects in the past. An important part of the Society's work is its publishing. It brings out three annual titles: Praktika tes Archaiologikes Hetairias (Proceedings of the Archaeological Society), since 1837, containing detailed reports on the excavations and researches carried out in all parts of Greece; Archaiologike Ephemeris (since 1837), containing papers on subjects to do with Greek antiquities, including excavation reports; and Ergon tes Archaiologikes Hetairias (The Work of the Archaeological Society), since 1955, published every May, with brief reports on its excavations.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The British School at Athens is an educational charity founded in 1886. It now forms part of the British Academy's network of Sponsored Institutes and Societies (BASIS) which sustains and supports British research overseas. The School exists to promote research of international excellence in all disciplines pertaining to Greek lands, from fine art to archaeometry and in all periods to modern times.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The BSR is a centre for research on the archaeology, history, and culture of Italy, and for contemporary art and architecture. It serves the needs of scholars and fine artists from the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth. The BSR is one of the research institutes sponsored by the British Academy, and is one of a large group of international academies in Rome.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, located in the East Building at the National Gallery of Art, is a research institute that fosters study of the production, use, and cultural meaning of art, artifacts, architecture, and urbanism, from prehistoric times to the present. Founded in 1979, the Center encourages a variety of approaches by historians, critics, and theorists of art, as well as by scholars in related disciplines of the humanities and social sciences.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The Center for Ancient Studies at the University of Pennsylvania strives to bring together students and faculty, as well as members of the greater Philadelphia community, who share a passion for the ancient world, through the promotion and support of events pertaining to pre-modern societies.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The newly formed Center for Comparative Archaeology at the University of Pittsburgh aims to help accomplish that goal by fostering the broad comparative study of social change in trajectories of such time depth that their earlier periods, at least, are knowable only through archaeological research.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The Columbia Center for Archaeology fosters links between all faculty and students concerned with the study of the past, materiality, and the relationship between the past and the present. We are located on the 9th floor of Schermerhorn Extension, where you will find computer facilities, the CCA lab, lecture/seminar room, faculty offices, and information noticeboards. The Center holds regular events, such as conferences, guest lectures and research seminars, student presentations, and informal social gatherings. We also coordinate information on Columbia archaeology courses, fieldwork opportunities and the New York Archaeological Consortium.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA is a premier research organization dedicated to the creation, dissemination, and conservation of archaeological knowledge and heritage. The Cotsen Institute is home to both the Interdepartmental Archaeology Program and the UCLA/Getty Program in Archaeological and Ethnographic Conservation. It provides a forum for innovative faculty research, graduate education, and public programs at UCLA in an effort to positively impact the academic, local and global communities. The Cotsen Institute is at the forefront of archaeological research, education, conservation and publication and is an active contributor to interdisciplinary research at UCLA.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The members of the Council of American Overseas Research Centers serve as a base for virtually every American scholar undertaking research in the host countries. They have bases in Afghanistan, Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia, Bangladesh, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Cyprus, Egypt, Greece, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Italy, Jordan, Mexico, Mongolia, Nepal, Pakistan, Palestine, Senegal, Sri Lanka, Turkey, and Yemen.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

Affiliated with the American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR) and the Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC), CAARI offers world-class resources through our comprehensive library of materials relating to Cyprus and adjacent geographic regions. Visiting students and scholars can find living quarters as well as technical and logistical support facilities. The Center hosts lectures, seminars and symposia for professional and lay audiences. We also offer fellowship opportunities for students and established senior scholars. The mission of CAARI is to promote studies of Cypriot archaeology and related humanistic disciplines. Historically, Cyprus has been a meeting place and crossroad of civilizations. The Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute serves a similar role today.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The Rome Department of the German Archeological Institute developed out of the Instituto di Corrispondenza Archeologica founded in 1829. The oldest European research institution, the Rome Department became a public institution supported by the Prussian state in 1871. Today the library's holdings are of international significance, a result of the Institute's long history and the many generous private donations it has received. Its holdings include one of the largest specialized photo collections in Italy, an extensive reference collection for academic research, including the well-established archive and the archeological bibliography (Realkatalog) that allows for the search of relevant publications. In particular, the collection focuses on Italian and North African Archeology from the pre-historical to the medieval periods.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The INSTAP Study Center for East Crete is a unique facility for archaeological research, especially in the area of Aegean Prehistory. The Center is committed to stimulating and facilitating publication in the broader field of Cretan studies, with a focus on archaeology and ethnology. The Center provides storage space for artifacts from American and Greek-American excavations in eastern Crete and offers services for the primary study of excavated material to both member projects and individual scholars. On a broader level, the Center also functions as a base of operations for individuals engaged in a wide range of Cretan research topics unrelated to the member projects. The numerous facilities and services at the Center are available to both individuals and projects. For information about availability, contact Thomas M. Brogan, Director of the INSTAP Study Center for East Crete.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The Institute for Mediterranean Studies (IMS) based in Rethymno, Crete, was founded in 1985 and belongs to the research units of the Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas (FORTH). The IMS is the only FORTH centre which deals with the human and social sciences. The other Institutes based at Heraklion, Patras and Ioannina, cover the fields of computer science and the natural and biomedical sciences.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

ISAW is a center for advanced scholarly research and graduate education, which aims to encourage particularly the study of the economic, religious, political and cultural connections between ancient civilizations. It offers both doctoral and postdoctoral programs, with the aim of training a new generation of scholars who will enter the global academic community and become intellectual leaders. In an effort to embrace a truly inclusive geographical scope while maintaining continuity and coherence, the Institute focuses on the shared and overlapping periods in the development of cultures and civilizations around the Mediterranean basin, and across central Asia to the Pacific Ocean. The approaches of anthropology, archaeology, geography, geology, history, economics, sociology, art history, and the history of science and technology are as integral to the enterprise as the study of texts, philosophy, and the analysis of artifacts. The Institute's Director and permanent faculty determine particular directions of research, but both historical connections and patterns, as well as socially illuminating comparisons, will always be central to its mission.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The Institute of Classical Archaeology (ICA) carries out multi-disciplinary archaeological research, conservation, and cultural resource management projects in the territory of ancient Greek colonies in southern Italy and on the Black Sea coast of Ukraine. ICA was established as a research unit in the College of Liberal Arts at the University of Texas, Austin, in 1974. Over the past 30 years, with major support from public and private sources, ICA has developed long-term projects to explore the agricultural hinterlands of ancient Metapontum and Croton in Italy and the territory and urban area of ancient Chersonesos in Crimea, Ukraine. Principal collaborators include the Archaeological Superintendencies of Calabria and Basilicata and the National Preserve of Tauric Chersonesos at Sevastopol. ICA's publications and research have brought it international recognition as a leader in the study of rural populations in the Greek and Roman world.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World is dedicated to the academic study and public promotion of the archaeology and art of the ancient Mediterranean, Egypt, and Western Asia (the latter broadly construed as extending from Anatolia and the Levant to the Caucasus, and including the territories of the ancient Near East); our principal research interests lie in the complex societies of the pre-modern era. Although the core efforts of the Joukowsky Institute are archaeological in nature and are located within this broadly defined zone, close ties with all individuals interested in the ancient world, and with archaeologists of all parts of the globe, are welcome and actively encouraged. The goal of the Institute is to foster an interdisciplinary community of interest in the archaeology of the ancient world, and in the discipline of archaeology more generally. Its mandate is to promote research, fieldwork, teaching, and public outreach, with the Institute’s associated faculty, students, and facilities serving as a hub for this activity.

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Research Institutes and Working Groups

The Maya Research Program is a U.S.-based non-profit organization (501C3) that sponsors archaeological and ethnographic research in Middle America. Each summer since 1992, we have sponsored archaeological fieldwork at the ancient Maya site of Blue Creek in northwestern Belize and ethnographic research in the village of Yaxunah, Mexico. The Maya Research Program is affiliated with the University of Texas at Tyler.

A key MRP goal is to encourage the participation of students and volunteers -- anyone who wants to experience the real world of archaeological or anthropological research and understand how we learn about other cultures may join us. We see this as a critical educational component of MRP's work, and it helps us accomplish our research goals as well! The ages of our participants range from 18 to over 80. So many of our participants return year after year that MRP has become an extended family. About half of our participants are university students under 30 years old and the other half are professionals and retirees. While the majority of participants come from the United States and Canada, we have students from Australian, European, Latin American, and Japanese institutions as well. For students, academic credit can usually be arranged. While many students go on to careers in other fields, many go on to become successful graduate students in archaeology or a related field and return to focus on MRP projects for their theses and dissertations.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

Early Mediterranean Societies brings together various disciplines to promote an integrated study of these societies through presentations by group members of their own research, discussion of common readings, and lectures by outside speakers. The focus of this group is cultural diffusion and societal interconnections, but any interdisciplinary subject falls within the group's purview. (Donald Haggis, Classics, 962-7640)

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The Program in Aegean Scripts and Prehistory (PASP) was founded in 1986 by Thomas G. Palaima as a research center pertaining to the use of writing in Minoan Crete (Cretan Hieroglyphic and Linear A ca. 1850-1450 BCE), Mycenaean Greece and Mycenaeanized Crete (Linear B ca. 1450-1200 BCE) and the island of Cyprus (Cypro-Minoan in the Bronze Age and Cypriote Syllabic script in the historical period ca. 1500-1200 BCE and 750-225 BCE respectivley). PASP was supported by the Comité International pour les Études Myceniennes, the governing international body for work on these writing systems, their texts and their cultures.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

Founded in 1939, the Research Laboratories of Archaeology (RLA) was the first center for the study of North Carolina archaeology. Serving the interests of students, scholars, and the general public, it is currently one of the leading institutes for archaeological teaching and research in the South. Located within the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's College of Arts and Sciences, it provides support for faculty and students working not only in North Carolina, but also throughout the Americas and overseas.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

Aegean archaeology has had a prominent role at Sheffield for almost thirty years. This concentration led to the establishment in 1995 of the Sheffield Centre for Aegean Archaeology with the support of the University. Since then, the Centre has gone from strength to strength, and its identity was enhanced by the establishment of a Chair in Aegean Archaeology in January 2004. Never before has there been such a concentration of both staff and postgraduate researchers as there is today, and never before have we been able to offer staff, students and academic visitors alike such excellent and wide-ranging facilities for research. The Centre remains dedicated to providing an inter-disciplinary environment for research in to all aspects of the archaeology of the Aegean.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The 5-year project is directed by Dr. Sofia Voutsaki, Groningen Institute of Archaeology. It is financed by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) and the University of Groningen. Additional grants have been received by the Institute of Aegean Prehistory, Philadelphia. The aim of the project is to interpret the important social, political and cultural changes that took place in the southern Greek mainland during the Middle Helladic period and the transition to the Late Helladic (approx. 2000 - 1500 BC). No satisfactory explanation of these changes has ever been given, and they remain one of the most pressing questions of Greek archaeology. The central question, the redefinition of personal, ethnic and cultural identities within wider processes of socio-political change, has a wider relevance and is one of the most debated question in current theoretical debates in archaeology. The task is undertaken by means of an integrated analysis of settlement, funerary, skeletal and iconographic data from the Argolid, northeastern Peloponnese.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The Archaeology Center at Stanford provides a forum for interaction amongst faculty and students in different parts of the University. It promotes theoretical, methodological and ethical innovation and encourages visiting scholars, post-doctoral researchers, faculty and students to work side-by-side on a daily basis. There is a strong global range of interests, with student and faculty researchers working from Southeast Asia to Europe, Africa and the Americas.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

The Wiener Laboratory is an active research department, within the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, dedicated to archaeological science in Greece. The laboratory was created through the vision of Malcolm H. Wiener and it remains sustained by his generosity. The Lab has grown since its inauguration on June 2, 1992, to offer a variety of fellowship opportunities, a library, and comparative reference collections, as well as a range of the specialist equipment and tools required by scholars exploring the past through scientific means. Research conducted at the Wiener Laboratory includes biological anthropology (the study of human skeletal remains), zooarchaeology (the study of animal bones), geoarchaeology (the study of soils and rocks, including metallurgy), and environmental studies (including the study of organic residues and botanical remains). Annual fellowships are offered in each of these areas.

Research Institutes and Working Groups

Professional Societies

The AAA is the primary professional society of anthropologists in the United States since its founding in 1902, it is the world's largest professional organization of individuals interested in anthropology.

Professional Societies

The Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) is North America's oldest and largest organization devoted to the world of archaeology. The Institute is a nonprofit group founded in 1879 and chartered by the United States Congress in 1906.

Professional Societies

The Australian Archaeological Association Inc. (AAA) is one of the largest archaeological organisations in Australia, representing a diverse membership of professionals, students and others with an interest in archaeology. It aims to promote the advancement of archaeology; to provide an organisation for the discussion and dissemination of archaeological information and ideas; to convene meetings at regular intervals; to publicise the need for the study and conservation of archaeological sites and collections; and, to publicise the work of the Association.

 

Professional Societies

Certifies professionals; collaborative project of AIA, SAA, SHA, and AAA.

Professional Societies

The Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies - The Roman Society - was founded in 1910 as the sister society to the Society for the Promotion of Hellenic Studies. The Roman Society is the leading organisation in the United Kingdom for those interested in the study of Rome and the Roman Empire. Its scope is wide, covering Roman history, archaeology, literature and art down to about A.D. 700. It has a broadly based membership, drawn from over forty countries and from all ages and walks of life.

Professional Societies

The American Schools of Oriental Research supports and encourages the study of the peoples and cultures of the Near East, from the earliest times to the present. Founded in 1900, ASOR is a not-for-profit 501(c)3 organization. It is apolitical and has no religious affiliation.

Professional Societies

The Society for American Archaeology (SAA) is an international organization dedicated to the research, interpretation, and protection of the archaeological heritage of the Americas. With more than 7,000 members, the society represents professional, student, and avocational archaeologists working in a variety of settings including government agencies, colleges and universities, museums, and the private sector. Since its inception in 1934, SAA has endeavored to stimulate interest and research in American archaeology; advocated and aid in the conservation of archaeological resources; encourage public access to and appreciation of archaeology; oppose all looting of sites and the purchase and sale of looted archaeological materials; and serve as a bond among those interested in the archaeology of the Americas.

Professional Societies

Formed in 1967, the Society for Historical Archaeology (SHA) is the largest scholarly group concerned with the archaeology of the modern world (A.D. 1400-present). The main focus of the society is the era since the beginning of European exploration. SHA promotes scholarly research and the dissemination of knowledge concerning historical archaeology. The society is specifically concerned with the identification, excavation, interpretation, and conservation of sites and materials on land and underwater. Geographically the society emphasizes the New World, but also includes European exploration and settlement in Africa, Asia, and Oceania.

Professional Societies

Book Reviews

The AJA publishes open access book and museum reviews as well as supplementary content that complements published articles. Volume indexes and select print-published content is also freely available.

Book Reviews

Bryn Mawr Classical Review publishes timely reviews of current scholarly work in the field of classical studies.

Book Reviews

Kleos, the Amsterdam Bulletin of Ancient Studies and Archaeology is a peer-reviewed, open access English-language bulletin concerned with antiquity.

Book Reviews

Undergraduate Programs in Archaeology

The Archaeology Program at Cornell University is an interdisciplinary field that offers one of the few majors in Archaeology available in the United States today. Faculty members affiliated with several departments coordinate Archaeology course offerings and help students identify archaeology-related opportunities for fieldwork, graduate study, and professional positions.

Undergraduate Programs in Archaeology

The Archaeology Program at UNCG introduces students to past civilizations and cultures around the globe and to the analytical methods, techniques, and theories that archaeologists use to facilitate their study. The major is designed to develop anthropological, historical, and geographical perspectives in archaeological research, encompassing prehistoric and early historic cultures. The Program's faculty is actively involved in research and/or fieldwork in the Mediterranean region, the Middle East, North America and South America, and students participate in these or other field work projects in addition to meeting classroom requirements. Graduates of the Program are prepared for advanced training in archaeology and museum studies; cultural resource management; team leading in a variety of settings; and other professions for which critical thinking and good communication skills are necessary.

Undergraduate Programs in Archaeology

 Stanford's Archaeology Program is unique in providing students with an interdisciplinary approach to the material remains of past societies, drawing in equal parts on the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. The Archaeology curriculum draws on faculty from a wide range of University departments and schools. To complete the requirements for the major, students must take courses from the offerings of the program and from the listings of other University departments. The program culminates in a B.A. in Archaeology.

Undergraduate Programs in Archaeology

The Department of Classics at Florida State University is the oldest in Florida and has emerged as one of the leading centers of classical studies in the United States. The faculty in Classics is distinguished in teaching and research. The department boasts special strengths in many areas of classical studies, including archaeology, ancient history, and Latin and Greek literature.The Department also plays an important role in training Latin teachers for the schools.

Undergraduate Programs in Archaeology

Boston University is a leading center for the study of archaeology and the only university in the United States with a separate, fully constituted, Department of Archaeology. We offer students a splendid opportunity to work closely with faculty in field study, in the laboratory, and in the classroom, developing professional expertise on an undergraduate level. While Boston University is an enormous institution with vast resources, the Department of Archaeology is a compact entity in which undergraduate majors, archaeology graduate students, and faculty interact with each other, formally and informally, on a daily basis.

Undergraduate Programs in Archaeology

The undergraduate concentration in Archaeology and the Ancient World provides students with the opportunity to explore the multi-faceted discipline of archaeology while examining the critical early civilizations of the so-called “Old World” — that is, the complex societies of the Mediterranean (not least Greece and Rome), Egypt, and the ancient Near East. The concentration, with its three tracks and its encouragement of fieldwork and independent research, is designed to allow students flexibility in structuring their own path through this remarkably diverse, and highly engaging, field of study.

Undergraduate Programs in Archaeology

The Classics department at Dartmouth offers four undergraduate majors and minors: Ancient History, Classical Archaeology, Classical Languages and Literatures, and Classical Studies.

Undergraduate Programs in Archaeology

The interdisciplinary major in archaeology combines the faculty and resources of several departments to create a program of study in prehistoric, historic, and classical archaeology. The discipline is concerned with the recovery, analysis, and interpretation of the material remains of past cultures and societies. The topics of study pursued within the program can vary widely, ranging from issues of human origins and cultural evolution to the study of Classical Greece and Rome; from the structure of ancient Pueblo societies in the American Southwest to the study of colonial life in Virginia. The program provides majors with a knowledge of archaeological method and theory and a thorough grounding in specific cultural areas. Number of students: There are approximately 20 archaeology majors in a given year. Many of the majors combine archaeology with a major in a related field such as anthropology, history, psychology, classics or biology depending upon their particular interests.

Undergraduate Programs in Archaeology

The Department of Classics is deeply committed to undergraduate education, and offers courses and majors that present a wide variety of perspectives on and approaches to the ancient world. While many of the courses focus on the languages and literatures of Greece and Rome, others are concerned primarily with the material culture of the ancient world, its art, architecture and archaeology. The department also offers many courses that introduce students to classical civilization and literature in English translation.

Undergraduate Programs in Archaeology

The Curriculum in Archaeology brings together archaeology faculty located in five units of the College of Arts and Sciences. These units are the Departments of Anthropology, Art, Classics, Religious Studies, the Research Laboratories of Archaeology. The Curriculum offers an undergraduate major and a minor in archaeology. It also offers courses and research opportunities for students in many parts of the world, particularly in the Americas, Europe, and the Middle East. Laboratories, computer facilities, and extensive research collections are maintained by the Research Laboratories of Archaeology. Additional archaeological collections are housed in the Department of Classics and Ackland Art Museum.

Undergraduate Programs in Archaeology

The interdepartmental Council on Archaeological Studies is composed of faculty from a broad range of disciplines, including Anthropology, Classics, Geology and Geophysics, and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations. Undergraduate and graduate programs are offered, the former awarding a BA and the latter an MA. Both programs are designed to expose students to numerous facets of the field of archaeology, including anthopology, art history, and history; studies often examine the material culture or transformation of various cultures in both the Old and New Worlds. Students in each program are, additionally, required to take an Archaeology Laboratory course which provides hands-on excavation experience at the Dye Works at Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.

Undergraduate Programs in Archaeology

The Johns Hopkins Undergraduate Program in Archaeology is an interdepartmental program that introduces students to archaeological theory, the analysis of archaeological materials, and the results of archaeological research in prehistoric and early historic periods in the Old and New Worlds. Archaeology studies human societies through examination of their material culture (physical remains), considering such issues as human subsistence, interaction with climate and physical environment, patterns of settlement, political and economic organization, and religious activity and thought. The field allows for the study of the entirety of human experience from its beginnings to the present day, in every region of the world and across all social strata.

Undergraduate Programs in Archaeology

Our archaeology major focuses on the discipline of archaeology itself and on the ancient civilizations of the Mediterranean and adjacent areas in western and northern Europe. The interdisciplinary nature of the major provides an excellent liberal arts education, as well as the necessary preparation to attend graduate school or other professional schools. In addition, Evansville's archaeology major retains enough flexibility to allow you to pursue a double major in minor in other areas of study that interest you. Our archaeology students often complement their studies with course work in anthropology, history, classical studies, religion, or art history, as well as advanced classes in languages or sciences related to archaeology. The majority of archaeology majors spend at least one semester abroad studying at Harlaxton College - UE's British campus - or enrolling in programs such as College Year in Athens, American Institute for Foreign Study in Rome, American University in Cairo, and Aix-en-Provence in France. Students also have opportunity to participate in excavations, including our on-campus training dig Tin City, and hold internships in museums in the US and abroad.

Undergraduate Programs in Archaeology

The Center for Archaeology is an interdepartmental center that does not have its own individual course listings or degree program. The links here provide information about the undergraduate program in archaeology and the graduate programs in which students conduct archaeological research. We have different programs of study to suit a variety of interests; all options share the same introductory requirements, but allow you to develop your studies in a range of different direction. The central tracks in archaeology are the Interdisciplinary Major in Archaeology and the Major in Anthropological Archaeology.

Undergraduate Programs in Archaeology

Students become acquainted with the methodology and research tools of the discipline as well as with its subject matter, and are encouraged to explore such related aspects of culture as history and literature. In addition to providing those elements of a liberal education, the program prepares students who wish to specialize in art history or classical archaeology for graduate work.

Undergraduate Programs in Archaeology

Graduate Programs in Archaeology

The MA Program in Archaeology at Cornell is designed to meet the needs of a wide variety of students -- in fact, it is for all promising students with a baccalaureate or equivalent degree and a serious interest in studying archaeology. Although applicants with little formal training in archaeology are considered, successful applicants often have completed significant course work and have some field and/or museum experience. Typical applicants intend to pursue archaeological careers in small museums, historic preservation, public archaeology, and other fields in which a Ph.D. is not required. Still others are foreign students who seek training not available in their home countries. We particularly encourage applicants from the countries in which Cornell archaeologists are active. The fields of Anthropology, Classics, History of Art, Medieval Studies, and Near Eastern Studies all provide for a specialization in archaeology at the Ph.D. level, and potential master's candidates are discouraged from applying. For this reason we have set up a separate MA degree program in archaeology. Admission to this program is, however not a commitment for later admission to any Ph.D. program, although internal transfers sometimes are permitted for qualified applicants.

Graduate Programs in Archaeology

Boston University is a leading center for the study of archaeology and the only university in the United States with a separate, fully constituted, Department of Archaeology. We offer students a splendid opportunity to work closely with faculty in field study, in the laboratory, and in the classroom, developing professional expertise at the graduate level. The Department offers a PhD program in Archaeology, and three separate MA programs in Archaeology, Archaeological Heritage Management, and Geoarchaeology. While Boston University is an enormous institution with vast resources, the Department of Archaeology is a compact entity in which graduate students, faculty, and undergraduate majors interact with each other, formally and informally, on a daily basis.

Graduate Programs in Archaeology

Graduate study of the archaeology and art of the ancient Mediterranean, Egypt, and western Asia is in a period of rapid innovation and expansion at Brown University. The Joukowsky Institute’s Ph.D. program in Archaeology and the Ancient World combines a flexible interdisciplinary atmosphere with a curricular structure that prepares students for professional careers in teaching, museum studies, or other relevant occupations. Students receive a broad overview of the archaeology and art of this complex region, allowing them to develop particular research interests revolving around one or more of its ancient cultures.

Graduate Programs in Archaeology

The Department of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology is a fully supported graduate program at Bryn Mawr and part of the The Graduate Group in Archaeology, Classics and History of Art. Each of these departments has a distinguished tradition and strong national standing, and interdisciplinary study is encouraged by the faculty, promoting a strong sense of community and collegiality among the graduate students. The graduate curriculum, which stresses both breadth and depth of study, has prepared students for successful careers in a variety of fields, including teaching, research, publishing, and work in museums and foundations.

Graduate Programs in Archaeology

The Ph.D. program in this department is considered one of the foremost in the country. The doctoral degree is offered in a wide range of fields from Ancient Near Eastern art and archaeology to contemporary art and critical theory, with most of the major fields in between strongly represented: Aegean, Greek, Roman; western Medieval and Byzantine. Archaeology at Columbia encompasses a range of disciplines, cultures, and approaches. In the Department of Art History and Archaeology, students and faculty come together under the joint title of the department through studies of urbanism, architectural space, and the context of visual images. Archaeology students here have access not only to the rich opportunities the department has to offer, but also to the Program in Archaeology that is a cooperation of six departments at Columbia University, as well as the network of archaeologists, archaeological sites, and museum collections in New York City as a whole.

Graduate Programs in Archaeology

Located only ten miles apart in the central piedmont of North Carolina, Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill together employ one of the largest concentrations of archaeologists in the United States, distributed in departments of classics or classical studies, art history, religious studies, and anthropology. The Consortium for Classical and Mediterranean Archaeology collaborates in order to enhance archaeology curricula and concentrations in the respective departments. The Consortium fosters an interdisciplinary dialogue on methods, theory, and practice in classical archaeology and material culture, provide students access to seminars, excavations, and other research opportunities, academic advising, and develop avenues for curricular and extra-curricular interaction.

Graduate Programs in Archaeology

The Graduate Group in Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology at the University of California at Berkeley offers a program for graduate students with interdisciplinary interests in the ancient worlds of the Near East, Greece, Rome, and Late Antiquity. The program leads to M.A. and Ph.D degrees in areas that combine work in history, art, archaeology, religion, epigraphy, numismatics, papyrology, and related disciplines of ancient studies. Its purpose is to encourage interdepartmental pursuits that take advantage of the rich diversity of resources available at Berkeley.

Graduate Programs in Archaeology

Graduate students participate in the Archaeology Program through their affiliate departments, from which they will ultimately receive their PhD degree. The following departments are affiliated with the Stanford Archaeology Center: Anthropology, Biology, Classics, Geological and Environmental Sciences, Geophysics, Art and Art History, Cantor Arts Center, Campus Archaeology, The School of Earth Sciences, History

Graduate Programs in Archaeology

The Department of Classics offers M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Classics with specializations both in Greek and Roman Archaeology and in Aegean Prehistory. For the past sixty years, the University of Cincinnati has trained students at the doctoral level and its graduates are among the most distinguished archaeologists in the field of Mediterranean archaeology. Recent graduates have assumed academic and research posts in the Academy at Athens, Drew University, Greek Archaeological Service, J. Paul Getty Center, Ohio University, Tulane University, University of Arizona at Tucson, University of Cincinnati, University of Cyprus, University of Leuven, University of London, University of Maryland-European Division, University of North London, University of Western Ontario, University of Wisconsin at Madison, and Xavier University.

Graduate Programs in Archaeology

Archaeology and prehistory are represented by a core group of full-time faculty within Anthropology and by supporting faculty in other departments such as Classics, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, History of Art, and Geology and Geophysics. Specialties include areal foci on Mesoamerica and South America, the Near East, China, and Africa; the origins of agriculture; the development of complex societies; and ethnoarchaeology. The Department has laboratory facilities for archaeological research, as well as access to major collections held by the Peabody Museum. Training is available also in methods of faunal analysis, ceramic analysis, archaeometallurgy, satellite image analysis and GIS (Geographic Information Systems).

Graduate Programs in Archaeology

UC Berkeley offers a combined MA/PhD program in Classical Archaeology. Most students are admitted after the BA and earn an MA on the way to the PhD, but a few students with an MA from elsewhere are admitted directly to the PhD program. We do not consider applications for MA work only. Study leading through the M.A. to the Ph.D. in Classical Archaeology is intended to ensure that students are fully competent in Greek and Latin and have a good understanding of historical method, as well as a thorough training, including experience in fieldwork, in Greek and Roman archaeology. Degree recipients should be qualified either for a major museum post, or for university teaching up to senior undergraduate level in the ancient languages and in ancient history, and at all levels including graduate instruction in large areas of ancient archaeology and art history.

Graduate Programs in Archaeology

This program involves a two-month study period at Ca' Foscari University in Venice. This interdisciplinary program combines maritime and nautical archaeology with the economic history of maritime trade. Students enrolled in the program will have the opportunity to take part in one of the underwater excavations of Ca' Foscari university.

Graduate Programs in Archaeology

This program in museum administration provides opportunities for research and professional training in the history and preservation of cultural artifacts.

Graduate Programs in Archaeology

The Post-Baccalaureate (Post-Bac) Classical Studies Program was founded in 1984 for students who already have a B.A. and some background in Latin and Greek; it is for those who wish to continue their study without immediately entering an M.A. or Ph.D. classical studies program and reach advanced levels in the Greek and Latin languages and prepare yourself for graduate-level work in classics, archaeology, ancient history, or related fields.

Graduate Programs in Archaeology

The Department offers programs of study leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Classical archaeology. The program in Classical archaeology requires: a reading list examination in either Greek or Latin; demonstration of proficiency, by exam or through course work, in Greek and Roman history; examination on a topic in Bronze Age or Greek archaeology; examination on a topic in Etruscan or Roman archaeology; a special field or topic examination; an examination in an interdisciplinary topic. Doctoral students must complete and successfully defend a dissertation that makes an original contribution to scholarship.

Graduate Programs in Archaeology

The graduate program in classical archaeology at UNC provides students with broad training in classical archaeology, including advanced coursework in a variety of interpretive methods and approaches to material culture in the prehistoric and classical Mediterranean. The program offers M.A. and Ph.D. degrees, and encourages students to work beyond departmental boundaries by taking courses in departments of Art, Anthropology, Linguistics, History, and Religious Studies.

Graduate Programs in Archaeology

The graduate program in Classical Archaeology combines rigorous language training with interdisciplinary study of material culture, ancient history, and archaeological method and theory. In addition to developing broad competence in classical languages and other areas of classical studies, students in the program work with the department's innovative archaeological faculty in the classroom and in the field, and often with faculty in other departments, including Anthropology and Art History. The program prepares students to succeed both as generalists in Classics and as active archaeologists. Most procedures and requirements are therefore the same as for the program in classical languages; but the archaeology program also has some special requirements. A faculty member serving as Archaeology Advisor helps each student develop an individualized plan of coursework to prepare for these requirements efficiently. The core teaching faculty in classical archaeology includes Joseph Carter, Jennifer Gates-Foster, Adam Rabinowitz, and Rabun Taylor, along with John Clarke, Penelope Davies, Nassos Papalexandrou, and Glenn Peers in Art History.

Graduate Programs in Archaeology

The course has a strong practical element and is particularly suitable for students with a liberal arts, humanities or social science background who need basic business and management skills.  

Graduate Programs in Archaeology

The Graduate Group in the Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World trains students for careers in the art and archaeology of Classical and Near Eastern Civilizations. Drawing on the vast resources of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, AAMW incorporates fieldwork, museum internships, and university instruction into a flexible interdisciplinary program leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. All students accepted into the program are fully funded for a period of at least five years.

Graduate Programs in Archaeology

The UCLA Interdepartmental Archaeology Graduate Program (AP) integrates archaeological faculty throughout the university for the training of graduate students who wish to pursue interdisciplinary research. Since the inception of the program, we have awarded over 100 M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Archaeology. Students form committees by integrating faculty from multiple departments, providing a unique opportunity to combine humanities, social sciences and physical sciences for the understanding of the ancient past.

Graduate Programs in Archaeology

IPCAA (the Interdepartmental Program in Classical Art and Archaeology) offers a course of doctoral study in the arts and material culture of the ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern worlds. Formally sponsored by the Departments of Classical Studies and of The History of Art, and located in the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, IPCAA draws on a distinguished range of faculty in several disciplines and on the rich museum and library resources of the University of Michigan. With its self-consciously interdisciplinary character, IPCAA is today widely acknowledged as among the very top programs in the country for the professional training of graduate students in Classical Archaeology.

Graduate Programs in Archaeology

The Department of Art History and Archaeology offers both a Master of Arts degree and a Doctor of Philosophy degree in art history and classical archaeology.

Graduate Programs in Archaeology

This program involves a two-month study period at the British School at Rome. It focuses on the archaeology, topography, art and architecture of the city of Rome, from the ancient to the Medieval period.

Graduate Programs in Archaeology

Research Libraries

One of two libraries of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, the Blegen Library focuses on all aspects of Greece and the Greeks from the earliest prehistory through late antiquity.The Library currently has more than ninety thousand volumes and nearly 700 periodicals. In its field, it is one of the premier research libraries in the world and the best in Greece. The Blegen library is open to Members of the American School of Classical Studies, and to approved visitors.

Research Libraries

On-line collections of the French School of Archaeology at Athens.

Research Libraries

Elijah School of The Prophet.com is an online Biblical Research Center that provides a resource of Biblical Studies concerned with information of a religious nature, although we are certainly not limited to religious studies in the strictest sense of the word.

Research Libraries

Opened in 1926 with 26,000 volumes from diplomat and bibliophile, Joannes Gennadius, the Gennadius Library now holds a richly diverse collection of over 116,000 books and rare bindings, archives, manuscripts, and works of art illuminating the Hellenic tradition and neighboring cultures.

Research Libraries

The library's collection focuses on all periods of Cretan history and culture with an emphasis on the Aegean Bronze and Iron Ages. In addition to numerous books and periodicals, the collection contains many geological maps of Crete and the surrounding islands, and an extensive offprint file with over 2000 articles.

Research Libraries

The Arthur and Janet C. Ross Library of the American Academy in Rome contains over 135,000 volumes in the fields of of classical studies and the history of art and architecture. Especially strong are the collections in ancient Mediterranean archaeology and art, Greek and Latin literature, ancient topography (including the history of the city of Rome), ancient religions, and related fields such as epigraphy, numismatics and papyrology. There is a good working collection in the history of art and architecture, especially Italian. The rare book collection comprises chiefly 16th-18th century imprints in classical studies, archaeology, art and architecture, including sizeable collections of Roman guidebooks and early art treatises. The Library also houses small but noteworthy collections in contemporary art and architecture, landscape architecture, Italian history and literature, American literature, historical travel books and music. The Library acquires ca. 2,000 volumes per year and subscribes to approximately 600 current periodicals. Preference is given to scholarly publications in the core subjects listed above. A special priority is given to publications from the United States, in the conviction that the Academy has a responsibility to represent the best of American scholarship to Rome's multinational community.

Research Libraries

The URBS library catalog online permits researchers to simultaneously search the catalogs of the libraries of the various foreign schools in Rome, as well as the holdings of the Vatican libraries in Vatican City. Catalogs that may be searched include: Accademia di Danimarca, American Academy in Rome, British School at Rome, Escuela Espanola de Historia y Arqueologia en Roma, Institutum Romanum Finlandiae, Istituto Austriaco di Roma, Istituto Svizzero di Roma, Koninklijk Nederlands Instituut te Rome, Libera Università Maria SS. Assunta (LUMSA), Det norske institutt i Roma, and venska Institutet i Rom

Research Libraries
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