AIA Awards

Award for Outstanding Work in Digital Archaeology

Archaeological Institute of America


Deadline: September 15, 2020

Digital technologies are driving important changes in archaeology.  Despite the increasing acceptance of digital technology in daily life, however, determining how to assess digital scholarship has proved difficult: many universities remain unsure about how to evaluate digital work alongside more traditional forms of print publication when faced with tenure and promotion decisions.  Recognizing the value of digital scholarship, and aiming to encourage its practice, the AIA offers this award to honor projects, groups, and individuals that deploy digital technology in innovative ways in the realms of excavation, research, teaching, publishing, or outreach.

Nomination Process

Nominations of projects and individuals are welcome. Nominations may be made by anyone, including the project director or the principal members of the team responsible for the digital creation. Nominations of collaborative projects are encouraged. At least one member of the leadership team, or any individual nominee, must be a member in good standing of the AIA. Please submit the AIA membership number(s) with the nomination.

Materials to Be Submitted

  • Name of Project
  • Nomination form

Additional Information

Because the field of digital archaeology is still nascent and the application of digital technologies to archaeology is in constant flux, the committee reserves the right to modify this award as the field evolves.  Furthermore, the committee also reserves the right not give the award if no deserving project is nominated.

Nomination Form

Archaeological Institute of America
Attn: Samantha Austin
44 Beacon Street
Boston, MA 02108

saustin@archaeological.org

Recipients


2020 Award for Outstanding Work in Digital Archaeology Winner

2020

The Flowerdew Hundred: Exploring a Cultural Landscape Through Archaeology

Accepted by Anastasia Dakouri-Hild

The Archaeological Institute of America is pleased to present the 2020 Award for Outstanding Work in Digital Archaeology to The Flowerdew Hundred: Exploring a Cultural Landscape Through Archaeology project (https://flowerdewhundred.org/).

“Flowerdew Hundred: Exploring a Cultural Landscape Through Archaeology” is a newly launched resource through the University of Virginia that harnesses a local archaeological assemblage to simulate archaeological fieldwork in an online environment. The project focuses on the site of Flowerdew, east of Hopewell, VA, and in particular on the “Stone House” excavation material, which is housed in the Alderman Library at UVA. This collaborative, open-source project involved three years of digitizing descriptive data, artifacts, maps, and diaries, in addition to conducting new research on this collection, including the creation of a new digital image archive for the finds, an artifact database, Harris matrices, a new 2D site plan, and an interactive 3D model. This extensive work was collaborative, involving undergraduate and graduate students, historical archaeologists, and staff from the Flowerdew Hundred Collection at Alderman Library and was funded by a Learning Technology Incubator grant from UVA. The final product is hosted on a WordPress website that contextualizes the site, provides new information on the phases beyond the Colonial period, and encourages both archaeology students and the general public to explore the complex cultural landscape of early Virginia. This dynamic educational resource enhances research on Flowerdew while also enabling hands-on, immersive learning.  It helps elucidate archaeological concepts, while at the same time it explores the stories of the complex past of the site that involved Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans.

For its leveraging of digital scholarship, simulation, and hands-on, active lab learning to provide a top-quality educational resource, The Flowerdew Hundred is a most deserving recipient of the 2020 Outstanding Work in Digital Archaeology Award.


2019

Open Digital Archaeology Textbook Environment

Accepted by Shawn Graham

The Archaeological Institute of America is pleased to present the 2019 Award for Outstanding Work in Digital Archaeology to The Open Digital Archaeology Textbook Environment.

The Open Digital Archaeology Textbook Environment (ODATE) supports the development of an innovative open-access, integrated digital laboratory, and e-textbook project. ODATE itself is an open-source environment (http://o-date.github.io) that brings together collections of interactive live-coding notebooks written in Python or R and provides reusable, replicable, and reproducible datasets and coding spaces for learning digital methods in archaeology. These notebooks are integrated with an open-sourced textbook that can be remixed into coursepacks. ODATE develops the skills that allow for and encourages the creation, use, and re-use of digital archaeological data in meaningful ways that enrich our knowledge of past societies. This pedagogical resource is a first for our discipline and will be an invaluable resource for students at all levels, from high school to graduate school. Such resources are increasingly in demand as the price of textbooks escalates, intellectual expertise in open content can be hard to find, and clear, trustworthy, and reusable code is not always available.

For its impact as a unique pedagogical resource, its usability and accessibility, and for its encouragement to develop innovative digital methods and techniques, The Open Digital Archaeology Textbook Environment is a most deserving recipient of the 2019 Award for Outstanding Work in Digital Archaeology.


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Nomination Form