AIA Awards

Graduate Student Paper Award

Archaeological Institute of America


Deadline: December 1, 2020

Nomination Process

Graduate students are the future of our profession and contribute substantially to the success of the Archaeological Institute of America’s Annual Meeting by delivering papers based on original research. Through its Graduate Student Paper Award, the Archaeological Institute of America recognizes this contribution and encourages outstanding research by students.

Eligibility and General Information
Eligible students are predoctoral students in any discipline related to archaeology who have had a paper accepted by the Program for the Annual Meeting Committee for presentation at the 2021 Annual Meeting of the AIA and who have checked the box labeled “Graduate student paper award” on the Open Session Submission Form that reads, “I am a graduate student and sole author of this paper and wish to be considered for the Graduate Student Paper Award.” If you are presenting as part of a session, you need to remind your session chair to check this box for you when they submit all of the session materials. Only graduate students who have a paper accepted by the Program for the Annual Meeting Committee and have checked the box on the Submission Form will be eligible for the award. Accepted papers should then be submitted by email and in their entirety to the Graduate Student Paper Award Committee for award consideration. All submissions are by self-nomination and remain anonymous throughout the award selection process. The full written paper along with images must be received by December 1, 2020. In substance and form, the paper that is delivered should be the same as that submitted.

The written paper and its oral and visual presentation will be judged for (1) originality, (2) concision and (3) delivery. Assessment of the presentation will not be affected either by the technological format of presentation or by circumstances beyond the presenter’s control, but rather it will be judged by the organization and rhetorical delivery. The selection committee consists of faculty and scholars who are members of the AIA.

Co-authored papers: We encourage collaborative work between students and will consider co-authored papers when all contributors hold student status. We are not able to accept papers with a senior scholar as co-author (anyone holding a Ph.D. at the time of submission) since the committee cannot determine the amount of input from the student author(s).

The award will include a certificate of achievement and a prize consisting of books from multiple presses that exhibit at the Annual Meeting. The winner will also receive complimentary meeting registration, two tickets to the Opening Night Reception, and two nights stay at the meeting hotel to attend the following year’s Annual Meeting, where they will be recognized at the Awards Ceremony.

Submission Requirements

  • Submissions must be in 12 pt Times New Roman, double spaced, with 1″ margins
  • Presenter names should NOT appear on any submitted materials
  • Allotted presentation time should be included in the document immediately under the paper title
  • Paper length should be appropriate for the time slot allowed (ca. 2 minutes per page is a good rule of thumb). Any paper that exceeds the appropriate length will not be considered.
  • Accompanying images must be submitted separately from the paper
  • Co-authored papers are only accepted when all contributors hold student status

Text and images should be submitted by email in PDF format to Samantha Austin at saustin@archaeological.org

Recipients


2020 First Prize Graduate Student Paper Award Winner

2020

Drew Davis (First Prize)

The Archaeological Institute of America is pleased to bestow First Prize for the Graduate Student Paper Award to Drew Davis, a PhD candidate at the University of Toronto. His paper, “Municipal Public Spending and Italian Urbanization in the Late Republic,” drew on epigraphic evidence from the last two centuries of the Republic to challenge the notion that private elite expenditure drove most large public projects in this period. Looking outside of the city of Rome, Drew showed that public funds, in fact, provided the necessary resources for a great number of building projects and was far more common in the urban landscape of Italian communities than had been previously thought. This commendable paper contributes to significant recent scholarship on the process of Italian urbanization, particularly the autonomous role of and substantial contributions by individual Italian communities.


2019 First Prize Graduate Student Paper Award Winner

2019

Cai Thorman (First Prize)

The Archaeological Institute of America is pleased to award First Prize for the Best Graduate Student Paper Award to Cai Thorman of the University of California, Davis, for her paper “Matrilineal Lineage in Cult for Hellenistic Queens.” In her paper, she presented an admirable and innovative study of the use of the Hellenistic royal title basilissa, drawing upon a broad range of numismatic and textual data. Thorman’s study introduced the possibility that, beyond simply conferring royal status or conveying the entitlement to receive cult, the title basilissa might be applicable only to women whose lineage could be connected specifically to a single common matriline. Thorman’s work may have significant implications for our understanding of Hellenistic political and social histories.


2019 Honorable Mention Graduate Student Paper Award Winner

2019

Victoria Moses (Honorable Mention)

The Archaeological Institute of America is pleased to award an Honorable Mention for the Best Graduate Student Paper Award to Victoria C. Moses of the University of Arizona, for her paper “Powerful Pups: Dog Sacrifice in Early Rome, a Case Study from the Area Sacra di Sant’Omobono.” In her paper, Moses presented a new analysis of faunal evidence from Sant’Omobono, a very important sacred site in the center of Rome that has wide ranging implications for how we view cult practice in the Roman world. Moses showed that the common occurrence of skeletal dog remains at the site shows evidence for ritual sacrifice and suggests that cult practice during the foundational period in Rome differed from what becomes the norm later.


2018

Heba Abdelsalam (First Prize)

Middle Tennessee State University

Ms. Abdelsalam’s paper, “Approaches for Protecting Cultural Heritage Sites: Mallawi Museum Case Study” presented a well-researched and creatively designed public archaeology project to reshape entrenched sentiments about local cultural heritage in Mallawi, Egypt (ancient Hermopolis).

Ms. Abdelslalam’s project integrated living history –in the form of actors speaking to visitors at the regional tombs– with community craft days at the Mallawi museum to showcase the connections between craft traditions past and present, from weaving and basket making to pottery production. Although largely targeting school age children, the blend of approaches reached a broader demographic, including adult business owners. Ms. Abdelsalam’s innovative approach circumvented thorny issues of religious identity and ethnicity to focus instead upon the ways in which the ancient and modern communities were connected by agricultural traditions and craft practice. In this way, her work offers a successful model for future outreach programs among local communities.

For her outstanding work in the protection of cultural heritage, one of the core missions of the Archaeological Institute of America, Heba Abdelsalam well deserves the AIA’s 2018 Graduate Student Paper award.


2017

Chelsea Gardner (First Prize)


2017

Laure Marest-Caffey (Honorable Mention)


2016

Andrea Brock (First Prize)


2016

Danielle Smotherman Bennett (Honorable Mention)


2015

Johanna Boyer (First Prize)


2015

Rachel Kulick (First Prize)


2014

Christopher Hale


2013

Annemarie Catania


2012

Margaret M. Andrews (First Prize)


2012

Allison Emmerson (First Prize)


2011

Natalie Abell


2010

John (Mac) Marston (First Prize)

At the recommendation of the Graduate Student Paper Award Committee, the Archaeological Institute of​ America is pleased to award to John Marston of the University of California, Los Angeles, the first prize for the best graduate student paper delivered at the 111th Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of​ America held in Anaheim, California, January 6-9, 2010.

The winning paper was entitled “Agricultural Strategies and Risk Management at Gordion”. The all around excellence of Mr. Marston’s paper and presentation were noteworthy. Most impressive was the integration of the archaeological and environmental evidence into a convincing and cogent scientific argument. His presentation demonstrated a synthesis of word and image that kept the audience engaged and interested. The question and answer session that followed showed the enthusiasm for his paper but also proved his ability to respond extemporaneously in meaningful and thoughtful ways.


2010

Stephanie Pearson (Honorable Mention)

At the recommendation of the Graduate Student Paper Award Committee, the Archaeological Institute of America is pleased to award to Stephanie Pearson of the University of California, Berkeley, an honorable mention for the best graduate student paper delivered at the 111th Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America held in Anaheim, California, January 6-9, 2010.

The paper was entitled “From the (Back)ground Up: Sculptural Technique and Content in Gandharan Relief”. In Ms. Pearson’s presentation she demonstrated perceptive insights and observations about known and published material making plausible and convincing arguments from a fresh perspective. Her excellent discussion of sculptural technique built a persuasive argument to support a new theory of the dissemination of artistic technique.


2009

Marcie Handler (First Prize)

At the recommendation of the Graduate Student Paper Award Committee, the Archaeological Institute of America is pleased to award to Marcie Handler of the University of Cincinnati, the first prize for the best graduate student paper delivered at the 110th Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America held in Philadelphia, January 8-11, 2009.

The winning paper is entitled “Chicken Soup for the Soul: New Evidence for the Practice of Magic in Hellenistic Athens”. Ms. Handler’s paper was a lucid and lively presentation of personal ritual. The combination of ceramic, faunal, and epigraphic evidence made for an entirely convincing interpretation and one that provided great and original insight into ancient curses in what is to date a unique social context. Her thorough command of the evidence and her dynamic presentation should result in a significant publication.


2009

Panagiota A. Pantou (First Prize)

At the recommendation of the Graduate Student Paper Award Committee, the Archaeological Institute of America is pleased to award to Panagiota A. Pantou of the University at Buffalo–The State University of New York, the first prize for the best graduate student paper delivered at the 110th Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America held in Philadelphia, January 8-11, 2009.

The winning paper is entitled “Mycenaean Dimini in Context: Discussing Settlement Types and Socioeconomic Complexities in Late Bronze Age Greece”. In this paper, Ms. Pantou demonstrated a thorough and professional presentation of evidence that was both compelling to those well versed in the subject and easily understood by non-specialists. Her offering of a new paradigm for Bronze Age economic and political organization based solely upon data from excavation challenged beliefs currently held and did so in a persuasive but non-confrontational way. Such work is how scholarship should be and displays great promise for publication.


2008

Stephan Zink

At the recommendation of the Graduate Student Paper Awards Committee, the Archaeological Institute of America is pleased to award to Stephan Zink of University of Pennsylvania, the first prize for the best student paper delivered at the 109th Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America held in Chicago, January 3-6, 2008.

The winning paper is entitled “Augustus’ Temple of Apollo on the Palatine: A New Reconstruction.” This paper demonstrated the qualities that the committee seeks in evaluating graduate student presentations. It was based on original observation of an important monument and was succinct and lucid in its presentation. Mr. Zink provided excellent graphics that forcefully and logically advanced the argument and were accompanied by a spoken presentation that balanced formal organization with informal rhetoric. This paper promises publication and exemplifies the highest of professional standards.


2007

Philip Sapirstein (First Prize)

At the recommendation of the Graduate Student Paper Awards Committee, the Archaeological Institute of America is pleased to award to Philip Sapirstein of Cornell University, the first prize for the best student paper delivered at the 108th Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America held in San Diego, January 4-7, 2007.

The winning paper is entitled “Potters and Disk Acroteria in Archaic Greek Architecture.” The committee praised Mr. Sapirstein for his highly original content, succinct and lucid presentation, and excellent graphics that forcefully and logically advanced the argument.


2007

Mont Allen (Honorable Mention)

At the recommendation of the Graduate Student Paper Awards Committee, the Archaeological Institute of America is pleased to give Mont Allen of the University of California at Berkeley honorable mention in the competition for the best student paper delivered at the 108th Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America held in San Diego, January 4-7, 2007.

His paper was entitled “Bridled in Bronze: The Prominence of the Horse on the Parthenon Frieze”. The committee recommended Mr. Allen for his concise and carefully illustrated argument of a controversial and much studied subject, his original interpretation, and his ability to provoke discussion.


2006

Elizabeth R. Macaulay Lewis (First Prize)

At the recommendation of the Graduate Student Paper Awards Committee, the Archaeological Institute of America is pleased to award to Elizabeth R. Macaulay of the Department of Archaeology, Oxford University, the first prize for the best student paper delivered at the 107th Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America held in Montreal, January 5-8, 2006.

The winning paper is entitled “The Role of Ollae Perforatae in Ancient Roman Garden Design and Ancient Plant Trade in the Vesuvian Region.”  The committee praises Ms. Macaulay for the rhetorical and visual clarity of her presentation, its clear organization, the pursuit of the implications of the research across many dimensions of garden studies, and for the originality of its method and interpretation.


2006

Nathan T. Elkins (Honorable Mention)

At the recommendation of the Graduate Student Paper Awards Committee, the Archaeological Institute of America is pleased to give Nathan Elkins of the Department of Art History and Archaeology, University of Missouri-Columbia honorable mention in the competition for the best student paper delivered at the 107th Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America held in Montreal, January 5-8, 2006.

His paper was entitled “The Function and Distribution of the Flavian Colosseum Sestertii: Currency or Largess?” The committee recommended Mr. Elkins for the clarity and originality of his presentation, its careful organization and argumentation of the many dimensions of his study, and the excellent handout accompanying it.


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