AIA Awards

Felicia A. Holton Book Award

Archaeological Institute of America


2019 Holton Book winner Timothy Matney

Deadline: February 1, 2020

The Felicia A. Holton Book Award will be given annually to a writer who, through a major work of non-fiction, represented the importance and excitement of archaeology to the general public. Submissions should focus on archaeology but may also delve into literary and historical topics. The work must have been published in English and bear a date of publication within three calendar years prior to (not including) the year in which the book is considered for an award. From time to time, the Holton Award may be given for lifetime achievement in non-fiction popular writing. Books written by current members of the Governing Board of the AIA or the CAA or by the Committee are not eligible.

Authors and publishers may bring their books to the committee’s attention by sending a Letter of Nomination and seven sample copies for distribution to the committee to the address below. Publishers are encouraged to submit e-books and audiobooks along with physical copies of the titles nominated. The Letter of Nomination should address how the book nominated fulfills the guidelines. AIA members are also encouraged to suggest books worthy of the award by filling out the nomination form. Please note that individual AIA members do not need to submit seven books. The AIA office will contact the publisher directly. Books may be submitted for the award only once, and should not be re-submitted unless specifically requested by the committee.

Letter of nomination and books should be received by Institute Headquarters at the below address no later than the deadline.

Guidelines for the Felicia A. Holton Book Award

The Holton Book Award is given annually to a writer who, through a major work of non-fiction, represents the importance and excitement of archaeology to the general public. This is a jointly sponsored award of the AIA and the Center for American Archaeology (CAA).

Submissions (by authors, publishers, or AIA members) should focus on archaeology but may also delve into literary and historical topics. The work must have been published in English, be available in the United States and Canada, and bear a date of publication within three calendar years prior to (not including) the year in which the award will be presented. No nominated book may be resubmitted for the Holton Award unless requested by the Holton Book Award Committee. From time to time the Holton Award may be given for lifetime achievement in non-fiction popular writing. Books written by current members of the Governing Board of the AIA, the CAA or of the Committee are not eligible.

Submission materials should include seven copies of the book and a letter describing how the book fulfills the criteria given below. Publishers are encouraged to submit e-books and audiobooks along with physical copies of the titles nominated.

The Holton Book Award will be presented at the annual AIA meeting.

Criteria for Submissions

The work should have broad public appeal and be written for an adult lay audience in a clear and engaging style. It should convey the excitement of archaeological discovery accurately and responsibly. It should be well-researched and provide new insight for the general public.

Nomination Form

Contact:

Holton Book Award

Attn: Awards
Archaeological Institute of America
44 Beacon Street
Boston, MA 02108

(857) 305-9350

awards@archaeological.org

Recipients


2019

Timothy Matney: Ziyaret Tepe: Exploring the Anatolian frontier of the Assyrian Empire

The Archaeological Institute of America and the Center for American Archaeology are pleased to present the 2019 Felicia A. Holton Book Award, for a major work of nonfiction written for the general public, to Timothy Matney and his project team for their book “Ziyaret Tepe: Exploring the Anatolian frontier of the Assyrian Empire” (Cornucopia Books, 2017).

This book is an in-depth, detailed look at field archaeology during the eighteen years of excavations in Turkey led by Professor Matney that ran from 1997 to 2014.  Day to day operations, the interpretation and evaluation of finds, conservation and presentation are all covered, with many striking photos to support the narrative.  It brings the daily work of this extended, multi-year dig to vivid life for general readers in a way that genuinely excites an interest in archaeology.

This citation also acknowledges Professor Matney’s three co-authors, John MacGinnis, Dirk Wicke and Kemalettin Köroğlu, along with the contributions from the rest of the project team over the life of the dig.

It is a pleasure to recognize Ziyaret Tepe as the worthy recipient of the 2019 Felicia A. Holton Book Award.


2018

Robert L. Kelly: The Fifth Beginning - What Six Million Years of Human History Can Tell Us About Our Future


2017

Miranda Aldhouse-Green: Bog Bodies Uncovered - Solving Europe’s Ancient Mystery


2016

Patrick Vinton Kirch: A Shark Going Inland Is My Chief: The Island Civilization of Ancient Hawai’i


2015

Allan Meyers: Outside the Hacienda Walls: the Archaeology of Plantation Peonage in Nineteenth-Century Yucatan


2014

Joyce Tyldesley: Tutankhamen


2013

Andrew Wallace-Hadrill: Herculaneum: Past and Future


Lifetime Achievement

Brian Fagan


2012

Jack W. Brink: Imagining Head-Smashed-In: Aboriginal Buffalo Hunting on the Northern Plains


2011 winner

Benjamin R. Foster and Karen Polinger Foster: Civilization of Ancient Iraq

The Archaeological Institute of America and the Center for American Archaeology are pleased to present the first Felicia A. Holton Book Award to Benjamin R. Foster and Karen Polinger Foster for Civilizations of Ancient Iraq (Princeton 2009).

The Fosters’ book traces Iraq’s rich and varied history from the earliest Neolithic settlements to the Muslim conquest, with chapters that focus on the individual cultures that prospered in this area. It effectively weaves ancient texts and archaeological artifacts to present scholarly research in an engaging style that makes complicated material accessible to the general public. The authors describe the agricultural revolution that produced cities, the invention of writing that made governance and literature possible, the law Code of Hammurabi, the successive domination of the Assyrians, the Babylonians, the Greeks, the Parthians, and finally the Sassanians. They conclude with an epilogue that brings the archaeology of Iraq up to the present day and demonstrates its importance to the modern nation to the rest of the world.

The book includes maps of the area, annotated illustrations of artifacts and monuments, an extensive bibliography, and an effective index. It is a concise and interesting treatment of a political area and of preservation and cultural heritage issues that are of great importance today.

The Archaeological Institute of America and the Center for American Archaeology present this award in recognition of the Fosters’ contribution to the field of archaeology through their effective exploration of the past and its continuing impact on the present.


2011 honorable mention

Patrick McGovern: Uncorking the Past: The Quest for Wine, Beer and Other Alcoholic Beverages

The Archaeological Institute of America and the Center for American Archaeology are pleased give an Honorable Mention in the 2011 Felicia A. Holton Book Award to Patrick E. McGovern for Uncorking the Past: The Quest for Wine, Beer and Other Alcoholic Beverages  (Berkeley 2009).

McGovern’s book takes the reader on a worldwide tour through the millennia in search of the origins of fermented beverages. At a Neolithic site in China, McGovern analyzes the residue in ancient pottery jars to find a grog dating back to 7000 B.C.E. In Iran, he discovers the first evidence of wine from grapes and recognizes jars used to make barley beer ca. 3500 B.C.E. His exploration takes him along the Silk Road, to Europe, to Africa, and to the New World.

McGovern combines archaeological, chemical, textual, and artistic data to elucidate the universal allure of alcoholic beverages. He posits that cereals were domesticated for their alcoholic potential as well as for use as a food staple.

The Archaeological Institute of America and Center for American Archaeology award an Honorable Mention in recognition of McGovern’s use of scientific techniques to extract new information and thereby to enhance our understanding of human history.


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