Grants

Richard C. MacDonald Iliad Endowment for Archaeological Research

Archaeological Institute of America


Deadline: November 1, 2022

Amount: $20,000

The Archaeological Institute of America announces a new grant program, the Richard C. MacDonald Iliad Endowment for Archaeological Research. The grant amount is $20,000. This grant will be awarded to projects that support research in regions that supply context to the study of Troy and generally help elucidate the Trojan War and its impact on ancient Mediterranean civilization. This can include but is not limited to Anatolia (modern Turkey), southeastern Europe, the Aegean and Crete during the third to first millennia B.C.E.

Geographic and Time Period Criteria:

This grant will be awarded to projects that support research in regions that supply context to the study of Troy and generally help elucidate the Trojan War and its impact on ancient Mediterranean civilization. This can include but is not limited to Anatolia (modern Turkey), southeastern Europe, the Aegean and Crete during the third to first millennia B.C.E.

The grant may be used for the purchase of innovative technologies as part of the research, including but are not limited to remote sensing, geographic information systems (GIS), geophysical techniques, LiDAR, global positioning systems (GPS), and space imaging radar.

To be eligible, applicants must be AIA members in good standing at the time of application and must have a Ph.D. in archaeology or related field. The grant is open to all professionals working in the field. Applicants must be the director or co-director of the proposed research project. Permits must be obtained before funds are dispersed. To be successful, applications must clearly demonstrate the impact of the project and the critical need for AIA funding. Although combining AIA funds with other sources of support is allowed, a MacDonald grant should be central to the success of the project.

The AIA will not fund overhead costs. Please note that funds may not be used for publication costs, for salaries for principal investigators, or to purchase land.

Dissemination of project results: Awardees shall be required to submit interim and final reports on their progress to the AIA. Grant winners are expected to provide a 200-500 word update for the AIA website either from the field or immediately upon completing the funded field season. A final report with a reconciled budget is due within 6 months of the completion of the field season. Grant winners agree to submit an abstract for a poster or field report for presentation at the AIA Annual Meeting following receipt of the grant. Winners are also encouraged to become an Interactive Dig on the AIA website. Full publication of the project results is expected, and plans for publication should be included in the grant application.

Contact:

Ben Thomas

bthomas@archaeological.org

Application Form

Recipients


2022

Jacqueline Meier

University of North Florida

Jacqueline Meier used the Richard C. MacDonald Iliad Endowment for Archaeological Research to fund her 2022 excavation at the Petsas House in Mycenae.  The project aimed to study the remains of animals excavated from a household at Mycenae to better understand how human-animal interactions linked Aegean societies during the Late Bronze Age by collecting new evidence of the livestock species, wild animals, and pets recovered from different contexts of Petsas House. Study of the actual animal remains from Mycenae will provide a more nuanced view of the economic and symbolic behaviors with animals during the Late Helladic period, providing valuable comparative information to assess how animal roles changed in later periods by the time of Homer.


2021

Müge Durusu-Tanrıöver

Bilkent University

Müge Durusu-Tanrıöver used the Richard C. MacDonald Iliad Endowment for Archaeological Research to fund her 2021 excavation at the district of Polatlı (Province of Ankara, Turkey). The project aimed to intensively explore Polatlı (western Ankara) through field survey and archaeometric analyses to offer a bottom-up archaeological perspective of local communities forged through long-lasting conflict between political powers to their east and west.


MacDonald grant winner, Donald Easton at Troy (Photo courtesy of Donald Easton)

2020

Donald Easton

Independent Scholar

Donald Easton used the Richard C. MacDonald Iliad Endowment for Archaeological Research to fund his 2020 excavation at Troy. The project aimed to perform analysis on up to 26 samples of animal bone to be selected from two tons of specimens taken from the Troy excavations of 1932-38 and now preserved in the Osteo-Archaeological Research Laboratory, University of Stockholm. The purpose was to test whether there was a 170-year gap between Troy III and Troy IV and, consequently, whether a hypothesised intervening “Proto-IV” period existed. The project aimed also to determine whether consequent late dates for Troy IV and V, of c. 2000-1750 BC, are correct.

Read about Donald Easton's experience

2020

Bonna Daix Wescoat

Emory University

Bonna Daix Wescoat used the Richard C. MacDonald Iliad Endowment for Archaeological Research to fund her 2020 project, The Samothrace Exploration Project. The project aimed to shed light on occupation and land use on Samothrace across the third to first millennium BCE, and its relationship to contemporary human activity in the Troad, northern Aegean, and Balkan hinterland. With the MacDonald grant, the project undertook a LiDAR survey of the rugged and often wooded landscapes around Middle Bronze Age and Early Iron Age sites. This data will form the basis for the first integrated investigation of settlement and transition across the island and over time.


Florence Gaignerot-Driessen
Florence Gaignerot-Driessen

2019

Florence Gaignerot-Driessen

French School at Athens

Florence Gaignerot-Driessen used the Richard C. MacDonald Iliad Endowment for Archaeological Research to fund her 2019 project, The Tombs of Aidonia Preservation, Heritage, and explOration Synergasia (TAPHOS). The project aimed to addresses the problem of Homeric archaeology from the particular perspective of tumuli, as emblematic monuments in the Iliad. It argues in favor of a Homeric archaeology that is not purely illustrative but considers archaeological realities in the context of cultural, social and political patterns characterizing the epics. The project was based on the tumuli recovered from the Early Iron Age cemetery of Anavlochos (Eastern Crete), which were brought to light in 2018 by the Anavlochos Project.


2019

Kim Shelton

University of California Berkeley

Kim Shelton used the Richard C. MacDonald Iliad Endowment for Archaeological Research to fund her 2019 project, The Tombs of Aidonia Preservation, Heritage, and explOration Synergasia (TAPHOS). The project aimed to elucidate how Mycenaean mortuary practices and ancestor worship were adopted beyond palatial sites throughout the Bronze Age through the systematic excavation and interpretation of recovered materials from the Bronze Age cemetery at Aidonia Greece.


Deborah Carlson
Deborah Carlson

2018

Deborah Carlson

Institute of Nautical Archaeology at Texas A&M University

Deborah Carlson used the Richard C. MacDonald Iliad Endowment for Archaeological Research to fund her 2018 Underwater Archaeological Survey of Gökçeada and Bozcaada, Turkey. The project aimed to conduct an underwater survey of Turkey’s only two Aegean islands, Gökçeada and Bozcaada, which have not yet been the focus of comprehensive, systematic, rigorous underwater survey in order to discover ancient preserved seagoing ships which sank while sailing toward or waiting to enter the Sea of Marmara.

Read about Deborah Carlson's experience

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