Events

The Last Human

Geological Lecture Hall 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA, United States

WINNER OF THE NORDIC:DOX AWARD 2022 Denmark, Greenland / 2022 Our most basic understanding of the origins of life was recently turned upside down when Greenlandic scientist Minik Rosing discovered the first traces of life on Earth in a small fjord near Isua, Greenland. His discovery predated all previous evidence by over 300 million years. […]

Caring for Navajo Culture: In Museums and Beyond

Geological Lecture Hall 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA, United States

Stephanie Mach (Diné), Curator of North American Collections, Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, Harvard University Cynthia Wilson (Diné), Native and Indigenous Rights Fellow, Religion and Public Life Program, Harvard Divinity School Wade Campbell (Diné), Assistant Professor of Archaeology and Anthropology, Boston University Join Stephanie Mach (Diné), Peabody Museum Curator of North American Collections and […]

The Mummies of Aswan: The Missing Link (Free Hybrid Lecture)

Geological Lecture Hall 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA, United States

In recent years more than four hundred ancient tombs, dating from the 6th century BCE to the 3rd century CE, have been discovered on the West Bank at Aswan, Egypt, near the Aga Khan mausoleum. A multidisciplinary team, including the Egyptian-Italian Mission, has found more than a hundred individuals along with their funerary equipment. Piacentini […]

The Living Dead in Ancient Egypt

Geological Lecture Hall 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA, United States

“Oh Unas, you have not gone away dead, but alive.” The Pyramid Text quoted here tells us that the ancient Egyptians believed in the continued influence of the dead in the lives of the living. The dead in ancient Egypt were supernatural intermediaries, folk heroes, and some were even deified, worshiped as gods in the […]

Finding the God Osiris: Latest Excavations at Abusir and Saqqara

Geological Lecture Hall 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA, United States

Free Hybrid Lecture Miroslav Bárta, Charles University, Czech Institute of Egyptology Miroslav Bárta will present the latest results from archaeological research at Abusir and Saqqara, two ancient Egyptian cemeteries. The exploration of several historically essential tombs dating to the Fifth Dynasty sheds new light on the rise and fall of the Old Kingdom empire and […]

Divine Mortals: Royal Ancestor Worship in Deir el-Medina (Hybrid Lecture)

Geological Lecture Hall 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA, United States

Yasmin El Shazly, Deputy Director for Research and Programs, American Research Center in Egypt The Egyptian craftsmen and artists who created and decorated royal tombs during the New Kingdom period (ca. 1550–1070 BCE) lived in Deir el-Medina. Today, this well-preserved village is a key source of information about the daily lives, artistic practices, and religious […]

Fossil Dispossession of Sioux Lands

Geological Lecture Hall 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA, United States

Lawrence Bradley, Adjunct Professor, Department of Geography/Geology, University of Nebraska-Omaha The continental interior of the United States—home to many Native American communities—is a region rich in fossils. Since the nineteenth century, fossils found on Native lands have been removed and placed in museums and universities without the consent of, or proper collaboration with Native Tribes. […]

Iron in the Sky: Meteorites in Ancient Egypt

Geological Lecture Hall 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA, United States

Victoria Almansa-Villatoro, Junior Research Fellow, Harvard Society of Fellows In ancient Egypt, iron harvested from meteorites was used to create ritual objects associated with royalty and power. An iron dagger from the tomb of King Tutankhamun is one of the oldest Egyptian objects verified to be of meteoritic origin. In this lecture, Almansa-Villatoro will discuss […]

When Evolution Hurts (Free Hybrid Lecture)

Geological Lecture Hall 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA, United States

Terence D. Capellini, Professor of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University Being able to walk upright on two feet is a physical trait that distinguishes modern humans from our early ancestors. While the evolution of bipedalism has contributed to our success as a species, it has also limited the evolution of other features and increased our […]

Rethinking Maya Heritage: Past and Present (Free Hybrid Lecture)

Geological Lecture Hall 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA, United States

Richard M. Leventhal, Professor, Department of Anthropology and Executive Director, Penn Cultural Heritage Center, Penn Museum, University of Pennsylvania The story of Maya culture as a once-great civilization that built towering pyramids in the jungles of Central America was developed and popularized by national governments, anthropologists, and archaeologists. Previously unable to control the story of […]