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Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture

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2316 W 1st Avenue
Spokane, WA 99201 United States

February 2020

When Did Vesuvius Explode?

February 20, 2020 @ 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm
Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture
2316 W 1st Avenue
Spokane, WA 99201 United States

Dr. Pedar Foss (Depauw University) It has long been held, on the basis of a letter of Pliny the Younger, that Mt. Vesuvius erupted on 24 August, AD 79. But after excavators began to work at the sites of Herculaneum at Pompeii, some scholars expressed doubts, suggesting a date later in the autumn of that year. Debate has increased with recent paleo-environmental research and finds from new excavations. Scholars have divided over a topic that might appear trivial—after all, most…

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March 2020

Technology and the Future of Classical Archaeology: the View from Pompeii

March 19, 2020
Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture
2316 W 1st Avenue
Spokane, WA 99201 United States
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April 2020

Prostitution in the Immor(t)al City: Investigating Pompeii’s Brothels

April 10, 2020 @ 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture
2316 W 1st Avenue
Spokane, WA 99201 United States

Dr. Sarah Levin-Richardson (University of Washington) This talk brings to life Pompeii’s purpose-built brothel, the only assured brothel from Greco-Roman antiquity. We take a virtual tour of the structure’s material evidence, from architecture to ancient graffiti (including the infamous erotic frescoes). In the process, we discover a world in which male and female prostitutes could flout the norms of society and proclaim themselves as sexual agents, where prostitutes and clients exchanged gifts, greetings, taunts, and praise, and where clients from…

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Humans as artifacts: inventing and displaying Pompeian body casts

April 11, 2020 @ 10:30 am - 11:30 am
Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture
2316 W 1st Avenue
Spokane, WA 99201 United States

Dr. Kevin Dicus (University of Oregon) This talk examines the modern life histories of Pompeii’s body casts. I begin by tracing the development of the casting technique that created the most tangible and poignant remains of Pompeii. These casts, however, are far from being snapshots of that infamous day; rather, modern intervention, and even fabrication, have blurred the distinction between ancient and modern. With the imagined biographies assigned to the victims, to the methods of forming and displaying the casts,…

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Kitchens, Dining Rooms, and Latrines: Daily Routines in a Roman House

April 11, 2020 @ 11:30 am - 12:30 pm
Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture
2316 W 1st Avenue
Spokane, WA 99201 United States

Dr. Mira Green (University of Washington) How did ancient Romans perform daily routines like cooking, dining, and using the toilet? This presentation explores the accounts from Roman literature about cooking, dining, and excreting alongside the archaeological evidence from Pompeii in order to recreate some daily routines in Roman houses. Roman law and literature indicate that household cooks and domestic laborers were assumed to be slaves. Because ancient Rome was a slave society, most households likely relied on slave labor. Thus,…

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Street Theater: A Pompeian Neighborhood in Five Acts

April 16, 2020 @ 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm
Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture
2316 W 1st Avenue
Spokane, WA 99201 United States

Dr. Jeremy Hartnett (Wabash College, IN) When we think of Roman cities, it is tempting to conjure images of temples, baths, and amphitheaters. This talk storms into the narrow streets of Pompeii to make the case that, for most Romans, the real action happened on the neighborhood level. By examining five stories at just one intersection far from the monumental center of this city, we will learn about (a) streetside religion, the former slaves who presided over it, and the…

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