Meet Our Lecturers

Professor Brian Rose is the James B. Pritchard Professor of Archaeology at the University of Pennsylvania, and is Past President of the AIA.  He holds his degrees from Columbia University (Ph.D.) and Haverford College, and his specialties include Roman art and archaeology, and the archaeology of Anatolia.  He has conducted field work at Aphrodisias, is Co-Director of the excavations at Gordion in Turkey, and is head of the post-Bronze Age excavations at Troy.  Professor Rose has held both the AIA’s Norton and Joukowsky Lectureships.

 

See Brian Rose's work in the American Journal of Archaeology:

Yorke M. Rowan is a Research Associate in the Archaeology of the Southern Levant with the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago.  He holds his degrees from the University of Texas (Ph.D. and MA) and the University of Virginia.  He is director of the Galilee Prehistory Project, co-directs the excavations at the Chalcolithic site of Marj Rabba, and co-directs the Eastern Badia Research Project, which involves survey and excavation at Maitland’s Mesa and Wisad Pools, two sites in the Black Desert of Jordan.  Dr. Rowan's current research interests include the ritual and mortuary practice of the Southern Levantine Chalcolithic Period, and ground stone assemblages from the Late Prehistoric to Early Historic Perionds in the Southern Levant.  His most recent edited volume, Beyond Belief: The Archaeology of Religion and Ritual (2012) draws together theoretical and methodological studies concerning ancient religion and ritual.  As a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow at the W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research, Jerusalem during 2013-14, Dr. Rowan is preparing a monograph on the survey and excavations of Marj Rabba.

Dr. Laurie W. Rush is the Army Archaeologist stationed at Fort Drum, NY, and is a Board Member of the U.S. Committee of the Blue Shield.  She holds her degrees from Northwestern University (Ph.D. and MA), and Indiana University Bloomington.  At Fort Drum she manages cultural property on over 100,000 acres of military land, including nearly 1,000 archaeological sites including five historic villages and over 360 farmsteads lost during the 1941 expansion of the military base; she also manages the LeRay Mansion Historic District.  Dr. Rush educates deploying personnel about cultural property protection during military operations, and also specializes in the prehistory of the Northeast and Great Lakes Region, and the local history of Jefferson, Lewis, and St. Lawrence Counties, NY.  As Native American Affairs Liaison for the Garrison Commander, she manages all diplomatic relations between the Tenth Mountain Division and federally recognized tribes with ancestral ties to Fort Drum land.

Kathryn Sampeck is Assistant Professor of Anthropology with Illinois State College, and holds her degrees from Tulane University (Ph.D.) and the University of Chicago.  Her areas of specialization include the archaeology and ethnohistory of Mesoamerica and the U.S. Southeast, the Andes, landscape archaeology, colonialism, foodways, political economy, urbanism, money economies, and ceramics.  She is the Principal Investigator for the Colonial Cherokee Landscapes Project, and has conducted fieldwork in El Salvador, Eastern Tennessee, Honduras (Copán), Bolivia, Southern Louisiana, Cantabrian Spain, and Kenya.  Professor Sampeck has numerous works in press and in review, is preparing a monograph on How Chocolate Came to Be, and most recently published "From Ancient Altepetl to Modern Municipio: Surveying as Power in Colonial Guatemala" in the International Journal of Historical Archaeology (2014).

Kathryn Lafrenz Samuels is Assistant Professor of Anthropology with the University of Maryland, and holds her degrees from Stanford University (Ph.D.), the University of South Florida and Bryn Mawr College.  Her areas of specialization are cultural heritage and heritage management, the environment, climate change, and international development.  As a US-Norway Fulbright Scholar she conducted ethnographic research on climate science at the High North Research Centre for Climate and the Environment in Tromsø, Norway, and has also conducted heritage management and international development research in Tunisia and Morocco; she has conducted archaeological research on Sicily and Cyprus.  Professor Samuels' forthcoming publications are Heritage Beyond Borders: Transnational Currents in Heritage Development and Politics (Springer), and Heritage Keywords: Rhetoric and Redescriptions in Cultural Heritage (editor with T. Rico, University Press of Colorado).

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