Meet Our Lecturers

Professor Stephen Harvey attended Yale University for his undergraduate degree and the University of Philadelphia for his PhD in Egyptian Archaeology. He currently works in the Department of Anthropology at Stony Brook University. Professor Harvey specializes in Egyptian archaeology, narrative in ancient art, ancient warfare, pyramid construction, ancient religious institutions, and sacred landscapes. He is the director of the Ahmose and Tetisheri Project in Abydos, Egypt.

Professor Sharon Herbert is a specialist in the Hellenistic Near East, and since 1997 has been the co-director of the excavations at Kedesh, in Isreal. She has also excavated in Greece and Egypt, where she led excavations at Coptos. After receiving her doctorate from Stanford, Dr. Herbert taught in the Department of Classical Studies at the University of Michigan. Currently, she serves as the Director of the Kelsey Museum as well as Curator of the Greek and Hellenistic sector, and is President-elect of the W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research. She was the 2008/2009 AIA Norton Lecturer.

James Higginbotham is the Henry Johnson Associate Professor of Classical Archaeology at Bowdoin College, and received his degrees from the University of Michigan (Ph.D.).  His areas of specialization are Greek and Roman colonization, ancient Spain, villas of the Roman Republic, the Romanization of Italy, and cultural patrimony.  Since 1991 Professor Higginbotham has been Field Director of the excavations at Paestum in Italy, and has also excevated in Israel and Greece.  His publications include contributions in J. G. Pedley and M. Torelli, The Sanctuary of Santa Venera at Paestum I, (Rome 1993) and Piscinae. Artificial Fishponds in Roman Italy, (Chapel Hill 1997).

Steven Holen is Co-Director of the Center for American Paleolithic Research, and he holds his degrees from the University of Kansas (Ph.D.) and the University of Nebraska.  He has served as the Curator of Archaeology at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, as State Archaeologist and Tribal Liaison with the Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA) in South Dakota, and as Public Archaeologist with the University of Nebraska State Museum.  His areas of specialization are early humans in the Americas, geoarchaeology, experimental archaeology, Clovis culture, lithic procurement and technology, and bone technology.  Dr. Holen's over 40 years of fieldwork span sites of all ages from the historic Oregon Trail to pre-Clovis mammoth hunter sites.  His publications include series on Great Plains Paleoindian Archaeology and Ice Age Humans in the Americas, both of which he has edited with his wife, Dr. Kathleen Holen.

Kathleen Holen is Co-Director of the Center for American Paleolithic Research, and she holds her degrees from Exeter University and the University of Michigan.  She has served with the Department of Anthropology of the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, and her areas of specialization are bone taphonomy and tools, cognitive and interpretive archaeology, and human dispersals into the Americas.  For the past three years she has conducted museum collection surveys and analysis of bone modification, since 2006 has worked on an Experimental Bone Modification resarch project in Tanzania and Colorado, and since 1998 has worked on excavations and surveys at Pleistocene sites in North America.  Her recent publication include "Evidence of a human occupation of the North American Great Plains during the Last Glacial Maximum" in IV Simposio Internacianal: El hombre temprano en America (2011), and a series on Great Plains Paleoindian Archaeology and Ice Age Humans in the Americas, both of which she has edited with her husband, Dr. Steven R. Holen.

Featured Lecturer

Thomas Palaima  is the Robert M. Armstrong Centennial Professor of Classics at the University of Texas, Austin, and he holds his degrees from the University of Wisconsin (Ph.D.) and Boston... Read More

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