Meet Our Lecturers

Gregory S. Aldrete

Gregory Aldrete is Professor of History and Humanistic Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Green Bay.  His areas of specialization include the city of Rome, daily life in the Roman world, floods and their effect, military history, Roman rhetoric and oratory, and non-verbal communication.  He holds his degrees from the Princeton (A.B.)and the University of Michigan (M.A. and Ph.D.), and has published a number of books and articles on his Roman research.  He has received various awards for scholarship and teaching excellence, and has most recently been awarded a grant towards his Linothorax Project (on ancient Greek linen body armor).  Professor Aldrete was the 2014/2015 Martha Sharp Joukowsky Lecturer for the AIA.


Bettina Arnold

Bettina Arnold obtained her BA in Archaeology from Yale University and her MA and PhD degrees in Anthropology from Harvard University. She is Professor of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where she served as the Co-Director of the Center for Celtic Studies from 2000-2009 and Coordinator of the Museum Studies Graduate Program from 1996-2012. She is the Editor of the on-line peer-reviewed journal e-Keltoi. Her area of expertise is the pre-Roman European Iron Age, but in the course of her career she has participated in archaeological projects ranging from the Middle Bronze Age through the early medieval period in western Europe. Since 1999 she has co-directed a research project in southwest-Germany focused on the burial record of the early Iron Age Heuneburg hillfort and its environs; two burial mounds associated with this site were excavated by the Landscape of Ancestors project between 1999 and 2002. Finds from those excavations were featured in Die Welt der Kelten: Zentren der Macht – Kostbarkeiten der Kunst, a major exhibition in Stuttgart in 2012-2013. Her research has focused on the archaeological interpretation and analysis of complex societies, particularly as reflected in mortuary contexts; material culture as a symbolic system and a means of communicating social relationships; the archaeological interpretation of prehistoric gender configurations in burial contexts; and the socio-political history of archaeology and museum collecting, especially their involvement in identity construction in 19th and 20th century nationalist and ethnic movements in Europe and the United States. Recent publications include: Bettina Arnold (2012) The lake dwelling diaspora and natural history museums: identity, collecting and ethics, in Francesco Menotti and Aidan O’Sullivan (eds) The Oxford Handbook of Wetland Archaeology and Beyond, pp. 865-881. Oxford: Oxford University Press; Bettina Arnold (2012) The Vix Princess redux: a retrospective on European Iron Age gender and mortuary studies, in Lourdes Prados Torreira (ed.) La Arqueología funeraria desde una perspectiva de género, pp. 215-232. Madrid: UA Ediciones; Derek B. Counts and Bettina Arnold (eds) (2010) The Master of Animals in Old World Iconography (Budapest: Archaeolingua).


Andrea Berlin

Professor Andrea M. Berlin is the James R. Wiseman Chair in Classical Archaeology at Boston University. She received an MA in Syro-Palestinian Archaeology from the University of Chicago’s Oriental Institute, and a Ph.D. in Classical Art and Archaeology from the University of Michigan. She has been excavating in the eastern Mediterranean for over thirty years, working on projects from Troy in Turkey to Coptos in southern Egypt to Paestum, in Italy. Her field of expertise is the Near East from the time of Alexander the Great through the Roman era, about which she has written four books and over forty articles. Professor Berlin is especially interested in studying the realities of daily life, and in exploring the intersection of politics and cultural change in antiquity. She is one of the Archaeological Institute of America’s most accomplished teachers and lecturers, having travelled to over 60 societies across the United States and Canada, most recently as the AIA’s 2008 Joukowsky Lecturer. In 2009 she was awarded the AIA’s Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.  Professor Berlin is an AIA Norton Lecturer for 2018/2019.


Bridget Buxton

Dr. Bridget Buxton is an Associate Professor in the Department of History at the University of Rhode Island. She holds degrees from Victoria University in Wellington (M.A. with distinction) and a Ph.D from the Graduate Group in Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology at the University of California, Berkeley. Her areas of specialization are underwater archaeology, and Hellenistic and Roman history and archaeology, especially the Age of Augustus. Bridget has conducted fieldwork and led expeditions all around the Mediterranean, most recently in Israel with the IAA Maritime Unit at Akko and Caesarea. She collaborates with Croatian and other European and American colleagues to apply new robotic technologies in underwater archaeology, and is an archaeological advisor for Oceangate Foundation.


Deborah Carlson

As a newly transplanted Chicago teenager, Deborah Carlson thought adapting to life in North Carolina would prove insurmountable. Then her parents insisted that she study Latin, which seemed at the time like a fatal blow. But in high-school Latin she discovered the world of Caesar, Ovid, and Pliny. The experience fostered in her a deep love of Greco-Roman antiquity, which she studied at the University of Arizona. After finishing her M.A. in 1995, Carlson taught Roman art and archaeology at Arizona for one year and then decided to pursue a degree in nautical archaeology at Texas A&M University. There, she earned the opportunity to work with George Bass as assistant director of a Greek shipwreck excavation off the coast of Turkey at Tektaş Burnu. Her 2003 appointment as the first female of A&M’s nautical archaeology faculty has given her the chance to train and advise the next generation of students, including a community of vibrant young women.  She has assisted in the direction of both terrestrial and underwater excavations in Italy, Greece, and Turkey, and has served as the Archaeological Director of Institute of Nautical Archaeology’s excavation of an early-first century B.C. Roman shipwreck at Kızılburun, Turkey, and as the Assistant Director of INA’s work on a Classical Greek ship at Tektaş Burnu, Turkey.  She has received various awards for her work, was the 2003/2004 recipient of the AIA’s Olivia James Traveling Fellowship, and a 2010/2011 AIA Joukowsky Lecturer.


Alison Futrell

Alison Futrell is Associate Professor of History and Head of the History Department with the University of Arizona, and received her undergraduate degree from the University of Utah (B.S. in Anthropology), and the University of California at Berkeley (M.A. and Ph.D. in Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology).  Her research is guided by her interest in the symbols and rituals of power in the Roman Empire, with particular focus on the deployment of gender and material culture in imperial politics.  Her first monograph, Blood in the Arena, looks at how the institution of the gladiatorial games functioned in the negotiation of power among different groups in the Roman Imperial West. She has appeared as a talking head on a number of documentaries for the History Channel and A & E, including “Hannibal”, “The True Story of Gladiators”, “Cleopatra’s World: Alexandria Revealed,” and, most recently, “Boudica: Warrior Queen”.  Professor Futrell is an AIA Joukowsky Lecturer for 2018/2019.


Andrew Goldman

Andrew Goldman is Professor of History with Gonzaga University.  He received his degrees from Wesleyan University and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (M.A. and Ph.D. in Classical Archaeology), and his research interests include Roman Anatolia, the Roman military, and Roman pottery.  Professor Goldman has worked at many sites throughout Turkey, including Çatal Höyük, and since 1992 he has been working at the ancient site of Gordion; the finds at Gordion are some of the earliest Roman military equipment excavated in the Roman East, and the site is the only Roman military base of its period to ever have been explored in Turkey.  Professor Goldman is also Field Director for the Sinop Archaeological Research Project in Turkey.  Current publication projects include Roman Gordion (in preparation, to be published as part of the Gordion Monograph Series, University of Pennsylvania Museum).


John Hale

Dr. John R. Hale serves as Director of the Liberal Studies Program and the “Individualized Major” in the College of Arts & Sciences at the University of Louisville, Kentucky.  He is also an Adjunct Professor of Archaeology in the Department of Anthropology.  John Hale earned his B.A. in 1973 at Yale University (Major: Archaeology), and his Ph.D. at Cambridge University in England (Dissertation: “Bronze Age Boats of Scandinavia”).

Professor Hale has more than 35 years of archaeological fieldwork experience, including excavations and surveys of sites around the Ohio River Valley, at the ancient Romano-British town of Dragonby in Lincolnshire, England, and at the Roman villa (and stud-farm) of Torre de Palma in Portugal.  He has also carried out interdisciplinary studies of ancient oracle sites in Greece and Turkey, including the famous Delphic Oracle.  Since 1995, Hale has been a member of an interdisciplinary consortium that is developing methods for using Carbon-14 analysis to date concrete structures from the Roman Empire and medieval Europe. 

In the area of nautical archaeology, Hale helped launch a search in Greek waters for lost trireme fleets from the time of the Persian Wars.  He has mapped a submerged Maya ceremonial center in Lake Atitlan, Guatemala, and has surveyed and excavated Roman and Arab shipwrecks around the ancient harbor of Caesarea Maritima, Israel. 

At the University of Louisville, Hale teaches introductory courses on Archaeology as well as more specialized courses and Honors Seminars on the Bronze Age, the ancient Greeks, the Roman Empire, Celtic civilization, Vikings, “Sacred Sites” in global perspective, and his own field of Nautical and Underwater Archaeology.  He has previously taught classes at Indiana University Southeast in his home town of New Albany, and also at Yale University.  At UofL, Hale has received awards for distinguished teaching that include the Panhellenic Teacher of the Year Award and the Delphi Center Award.  As a member of the Archaeological Institute of America he served as a national “Norton” Lecturer in 2009/2010, and is currently giving lectures across the country in his 2017/2018 year of service as an AIA “Joukowsky” Lecturer.  Some of these courses, as well as his course on “The Art of Public Speaking”, are now available in the catalogue of “Great Courses” sold by The Teaching Company Inc.

John Hale has published reports on his work in the journals AntiquityThe Classical BulletinThe Journal of Roman Archaeology, Radiocarbon, and Scientific American.  Several of his projects have been featured in the “Science” section of The New York Times by science reporter William Broad.  Hale is also the author of Lords of the Sea (Viking/Penguin 2009), a history of the ancient Athenian navy and the birth of democracy.


Patrick Hunt

Patrick Hunt is with the Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies at Stanford University, the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at UCLA, the School of Cultural Diplomacy in London, the Fromm Institute in San Francisco, and the Institute for EthnoMedicine.  He holds his Ph.D. from the Institute of Archaeology, University of London, and has also studied at the University of California at Berkeley, and the American School of Classical Studies in Athens.  His research interests are Alpine archaeology, archaeological science, archaeometry, geoarchaeology, forensic archaeology, Roman archaeology, Celtic archaeology, and Hannibal studies.  His main publications include Alpine Archaeology (2007), and Ten Discoveries That Rewrote History (2007), as well as numerous articles and encyclopedia entries, and his most recent book is Hannibal.


Morag Kersel

Morag Kersel is with the Department of Anthropology at DePaul University, and holds her degrees from Cambridge University (Ph.D.), the University of Georgia (M.H.P.), the University of Toronto (M.A.) and Queen’s University (B.A.H.).  Her areas of specialization are Eastern Mediterranean and Levantine Prehistory, cultural heritage protection and policy (trade in antiquities, museum practice, and archaeological ethics), and archaeological field school teaching methods.  She is co-director of both the Following the Pots Project in Jordan and the Galilee Prehistory Project in Israel.  Dr. Kersel is an AIA Joukowsky Lecturer for 2018/2019.


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