Meet Our Lecturers

Gregory Aldrete is Professor of History and Humanistic Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Green Bay.  His areas of specialization include the city of Rome, daily life in the Roman world, floods and their effect, military history, Roman rhetoric and oratory, and non-verbal communication.  He holds his degrees from the Princeton (A.B.)and the University of Michigan (M.A. and Ph.D.), and has published a number of books and articles on his Roman research.  He has received various awards for scholarship and teaching excellence, and has most recently been awarded a grant towards his Linothorax Project (on ancient Greek linen body armor).  Professor Aldrete was the 2014/2015 Martha Sharp Joukowsky Lecturer for the AIA.

Bettina Arnold obtained her BA in Archaeology from Yale University and her MA and PhD degrees in Anthropology from Harvard University. She is Professor of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where she served as the Co-Director of the Center for Celtic Studies from 2000-2009 and Coordinator of the Museum Studies Graduate Program from 1996-2012. She is the Editor of the on-line peer-reviewed journal e-Keltoi. Her area of expertise is the pre-Roman European Iron Age, but in the course of her career she has participated in archaeological projects ranging from the Middle Bronze Age through the early medieval period in western Europe. Since 1999 she has co-directed a research project in southwest-Germany focused on the burial record of the early Iron Age Heuneburg hillfort and its environs; two burial mounds associated with this site were excavated by the Landscape of Ancestors project between 1999 and 2002. Finds from those excavations were featured in Die Welt der Kelten: Zentren der Macht - Kostbarkeiten der Kunst, a major exhibition in Stuttgart in 2012-2013. Her research has focused on the archaeological interpretation and analysis of complex societies, particularly as reflected in mortuary contexts; material culture as a symbolic system and a means of communicating social relationships; the archaeological interpretation of prehistoric gender configurations in burial contexts; and the socio-political history of archaeology and museum collecting, especially their involvement in identity construction in 19th and 20th century nationalist and ethnic movements in Europe and the United States. Recent publications include: Bettina Arnold (2012) The lake dwelling diaspora and natural history museums: identity, collecting and ethics, in Francesco Menotti and Aidan O'Sullivan (eds) The Oxford Handbook of Wetland Archaeology and Beyond, pp. 865-881. Oxford: Oxford University Press; Bettina Arnold (2012) The Vix Princess redux: a retrospective on European Iron Age gender and mortuary studies, in Lourdes Prados Torreira (ed.) La Arqueología funeraria desde una perspectiva de género, pp. 215-232. Madrid: UA Ediciones; Derek B. Counts and Bettina Arnold (eds) (2010) The Master of Animals in Old World Iconography (Budapest: Archaeolingua).

John Arthur is Associate Professor with the Department of Society, Culture, and Language at the University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, and holds his degrees from the University of Texas at Austin, the University of Texas at San Antonio (MA), and the University of Florida (PhD).  His research interests are ethnoarchaeology, the archaeology of beer, ceramic technology, experimental archaeology, craft specialization, complex societies, African archaeology and North American archaeology, and his current project is on interpreting social stratification from African archaeological and living contexts.  His work in the Gamo highlands (southwestern Ethiopia) with Kathryn Arthur and Matthew Curtis led to the 2015 article in Science describing a 4,500 year old male human skeleton from Mota Cave that provided the first complete ancient human genome sequenced from the African continent found.

Erin Walcek Averett is Associate Professor of Archaeology at Creighton University, and also serves as the Adjunct Curator of Antiquities at the Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha; she holds her Ph.D. from the University of Missouri.  Her areas of specialization are the archaeology of Cyprus, Greek art and archaeology, ancient religion, figurine studies, Easten Mediterranean interactions, and the construction of gender in the ancient Mediterranean.  Since 2003 Professor Averett has been the Assistant Director of the Athienou Archaeological Project on Cyprus.

Kroum Batchvarov is Associate Professor of Maritime Archaeology at the University of Connecticut, and holds his degrees from Park College and Texas A&M University (MA and PhD).  He has a number of ongoing projects, including the Black Sea Maritime Archaeology Project (as Co-Principal Investigator), the Rockley Bay Research Project in Tobago (as Project Director and Principal Investigator), and the Vasa project (analysis of construction and documentation of a 17th century Dutch-built man-of-war); he also served as Co-Principal Investigator for the Ropotamo inundated Chalcolithic settlement excavation (part of teh Black Sea Maritime Archaeology Project).  His publications include Domestic Economy aboard a Black Sea merchantman (in press), and A Method for Documenting Hidden Structures on Shipwrecks (in review).

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