Meet Our Lecturers

James Aimers is Associate Professor with the State University of New York at Geneseo, and holds his degrees from Tulane University (Ph.D.) and Trent University.  His research interests are Maya archaeology, especially ceramics and architecture, and anthropological approaches to material culture, religion, technology and gender.  He has published and presented his work widely, and is currently the Ceramicist for the Belize Valley Archaeological  Reconnaissance Project, and the Lamanai Archaeological Project.

Alexander Mazarakis Ainian is Professor of Classical Archaeology with the University of Thessaly in Greece.  He studied History of Art and Archaology at the Université Libre de Bruxelles", Belgium (1980-1983, degree conferred with “Grande Distinction”) and continued his postgraduate studies at University College London with a grant from the Alexander Onassis Benefit Foundation, obtaining his Ph.D. in 1987, under the supervision of Professor J.N. Coldstream.  Since 2009 he has been the President of the Scientific Committee of the University of Thessaly Publications and a Member of the Board for the Management of the Assets of the University. He has been the Scientific Director of several major European Union Research Programs as well as personal research programs and several other scientific projects.  He has directed the excavations at Skala Oropou in northern Attica (and Early Iron Age metalworking site), at the ancient capital of Kythnos (Archaic-Hellenistic sanctuary), at Soros in Thessaly (Late Archaic-Classical sanctuary of Apollo at ancient Amphanai or Pagasai).  Professor Ainian's areas of specialization are the archaeology and architecture of Early Iron Age and Archaic Greece, and Homeric Archaeology, as well as ancient Greek religion and sanctuaries of the Geometric through the Classical periods. In recent years he has also specialized in underwater archaeology.  Professor Ainian is a 2014/2015 Kress Lecturer for the AIA.

 

Gregory Aldrete is Professor of History and Humanistic Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Green Bay.  His areas of specialization include the city of Rome, daily life in the Roman world, floods and their effect, military history, Roman rhetoric and oratory, and non-verbal communication.  He holds his degrees from the Princeton (A.B.)and the University of Michigan (M.A. and Ph.D.), and has published a number of books and articles on his Roman research.  He has received various awards for scholarship and teaching excellence, and has most recently been awarded a grant towards his Linothorax Project (on ancient Greek linen body armor).  Professor Aldrete is a 2014/2015 Martha Sharp Joukowsky Lecturer for the AIA.

Susan Heuck Allen is Visiting Scholar in the Department of Classics at Brown University. She received her Ph.D. in Classics and Classical Archaeology from Brown University, after earning degrees from the University of Cincinnati and Smith College. Her areas of expertise - Troy and the history of archaeology - were combined in her book, Finding the Walls of Troy: Frank Calvert and Heinrich Schliemann at Hisarlik (University of California Press -- Berkley, 1999). She is also the author of Excavating Our Past: Perspectives on the History of the Archaeological Institute of America, which is a part of the 2002 AIA Monograph Series, and recently published Classical Spies: American Archaeologists with the OSS in World War II Greece (University of Michigan Press, 2011).  Dr. Allen has held positions at Smith College, and Clark and Yale Universities, and has done fieldwork in Cyprus, Israel, and Knossos. She was named a Mellon Fellow in 2008, and has held a number of other fellowships.

Dr. Stephen Batiuk is Research Associate with the Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations, University of Toronto, as well as Director of Excavations for the Tayinat Archaeological Project (Turkey) and the Project Manager for the Computational Research on the Ancient Near East (CRANE) Project.  He holds his degrees from the University of Toronto (Ph.D.) and the University of Ottawa, and his areas of specialization include Near Eastern archaeology (particularly the Bronze and Irons Ages of Turkey, Syria and the Caucasus), and the origins of viticulture and viniculture.

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