Events

Tales from Under the Mediterranean Sea: Reminiscences of a Maritime Archaeologist

Hale Science Building, Rm. 270 1350 Pleasant Street, Boulder, CO, United States

The lecture presented by Dr. Robert Hohlfelder (Emeritus Professor, CU Boulder), will cover some of the most amazing discoveries of his long career including: A Treasure Trove of 4th Century CE Glass Panels Found in the Sea, Pixie Dust and Roman Imperial Maritime Infrastructure, The Amazing Levitating Roman Amphoras, Two Harrowing Episodes 1,000 feet Below […]

Street Theater: A Pompeian Neighborhood in Five Acts by Dr. Jeremy Hartnett

When we think of Roman cities, it is tempting to conjure images of temples, baths, and amphitheaters. This talk storms into the narrow streets of Pompeii to make the case that, for most Romans, the real action happened on the neighborhood level. As told through five different stories, we will see how ancient historians repopulate […]

King Midas of the Golden Touch in Context: Death, Belief, Behavior, and Society in Ancient Phrygia

CU Museum of Natural History Broadway, Boulder, CO, United States

Professor Elspeth Dusinberre will present her current work on the spectacular burial tumuli at Gordion (Turkey), the capital of ancient Phrygia and seat of the legendary (but historical) King Midas of the Golden Touch. This talk will consider material ranging from ca. 850-525 BCE. It will begin with Gordion’s oldest burial tumuli and look at […]

Expanding the Spatial and Temporal Limits of the Pinson Mounds Landscape in Western Tennessee

CU Museum of Natural History Broadway, Boulder, CO, United States

In this lecture, Professor Ed Henry will discuss the monumental earthen architecture present at Pinson Mounds State Archaeological Park (PMSAP) in West Tennessee, which features prominently in the archaeology of the American Midsouth. However, the Johnston and Elijah Bray mound sites, situated west and east of PMSAP respectively, are considered the anchors in defining the […]

New Technologies and Architectural Insights at the First Doric Temple in Sicily

CU Museum of Natural History Broadway, Boulder, CO, United States

In this talk, Dr. Phil Sapirstein presents his findings from a recent digital and architectural restudy of the temple of Apollo at Syracuse. Built in ca. 590 BCE, it was the first major Greek temple to be built entirely from stone, and thus it is fundamental to our understanding of the origins of Doric architecture. […]

Imagining a Greek Home for an Egyptian Goddess: Time, Landscape, and Architecture in Greek Sanctuaries to Isis presented by Dr. Lindsey Mazurek

Hale Science Building, Rm. 270 1350 Pleasant Street, Boulder, CO, United States

When Isis first arrived on Greek shores in the 3rd century BCE, her new followers had to build sanctuaries appropriate to an Egyptian goddess. In the process of imagining a place for their Greek Isis to dwell, devotees came up with a wide range of eclectic solutions that intertwined local needs, imperialist fantasy, and fantastical […]

“They are still teaching us”: Community Bioarchaeology and the Sisters of Loretto Project presented by Dr. Lauren Hosek

CU Museum of Natural History Broadway, Boulder, CO, United States

In the summer of 2022, construction necessitated the relocation of a small 19th /20th century cemetery of nuns from southwest Denver. Before their reinterment, a team of local researchers and students worked with the Loretto Community to undertake a bioarchaeological analysis of the remains of the Sisters of Loretto. This ongoing project highlights community collaboration, […]

The Arizona Sicily Project: Survey and Excavations in the province of Trapani presented by Dr. Emma Blake

CU Museum of Natural History Broadway, Boulder, CO, United States

A decade of fieldwork in westernmost Sicily has revealed a previously unnoticed pattern: high quantities of North African artifacts in virtually all periods, from the Paleolithic to the present day. From prehistoric stone tools, to Carthaginian amphoras and Roman finewares, to the soda bottles of contemporary migrants, a picture emerges of a deep and enduring […]

Landscapes of Predation: Exploring Hostile Social Environments in Small-Scale Societies presented by Dr. Catherine Cameron (CU Boulder, Anthropology)

Ancient social environments are difficult to reconstruct, and archaeologists have a much poorer grasp of how the social environment affects where and how people live. One sort of social behavior that is often visible archaeologically is violence: raiding and warfare. Using ethnohistoric cases, I identify “landscapes of predation” created by intense social violence. I will […]