Gault, Texas
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    AIA Site Preservation Committee members, trustees, and staff visit the Gault archaeological site.Over 2 million artifacts have been found at the Gault site in a little over a decade of excavations. The ready availability of quality chert (above, used to make stone tools) was one of the factors that made the area so attractive to early inhabitants of the Americas.AIA CEO Peter Herdrich, AIA President Elizabeth Bartman, and AIA Director of Programs Ben Thomas at Gault.Gault School of Archaeological Research (GSAR) Executive Director, Clark Wernecke led a tour for the AIA visitors.
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  • About the Project


    Gault, Texas

    The Gault Site in central Texas is regarded as one of the premier archaeological sites for helping us to understand the arrival of native peoples in the Americas. Continuously occupied by humans for 14,000 years, the site has yielded over 2.6 million archaeologically excavated artifacts in the last decade (mostly stone tools). But, looting and vandalism are threatening the site.

AIA Site Preservation Committee members, trustees, and staff visit the Gault archaeological site. Over 2 million artifacts have been found at the Gault site in a little over a decade of excavations. The ready availability of quality chert (above, used to make stone tools) was one of the factors that made the area so attractive to early inhabitants of the Americas. AIA CEO Peter Herdrich, AIA President Elizabeth Bartman, and AIA Director of Programs Ben Thomas at Gault. Gault School of Archaeological Research (GSAR) Executive Director, Clark Wernecke led a tour for the AIA visitors. It was easy to see why this landscape attracted early Americans. AIA former trustee Lynn Quigley looks at the sign marking where in the world the many excavators at Gault hail from. Clark Wernecke shows AIA trustee Julie Herzig the stratigraphy profile of an earlier excavation unit. AIA visitors got a glimpse of the current excavation area during their tour. AIA President Elizabeth Bartman at Gault. After the tour concluded, Bartman commented: “the Gault School of Archaeological Research is making great use of the funds awarded to them by the AIA Site Preservation Committee. They have certainly set a high standard that I hope all our future grant applicants will strive to meet.” Nancy Littlefield, GSAR Educational Coordinator, in the booth at the CAST 2010 conference (7,000 Texan science teachers were in attendance). One project the AIA Site Preservation Grant covered was the writing, design, and printing of a teacher’s guide to a free DVD GSAR distributes. Teacher's workshop participants outside the Gault School of Archaeological Research (GSAR)'s fieldhouse. D. Clark Wernecke (GSAR Executive Director) in front. All the teachers got to try their hand at some primitive technologies including the use of an atlatl Participants and Gault staff wetscreen looking for artifacts With the help of GSAR staff and interns everyone got a chance to learn firsthand about excavation (and record keeping) (AIA/Gault School of Archaeological Research) (AIA/Gault School of Archaeological Research) (AIA/Gault School of Archaeological Research) Site Preservation Grant Awarded to Gault Site in Texas Site Preservation Grant Awarded to Gault Site in Texas Site Preservation Grant Awarded to Gault Site in Texas

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