Umm el-Jimal, Jordan
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    The double‐arch window at House XVIII, a major domestic complexInterior of the so‐called ‘Barracks,’ likely a small Roman/Byzantine cavalry fort that was later converted to a monastery.AIA/Open Hand Studios and Umm el-Jimal ProjectPottery and other artifacts from Umm el-Jimal
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  • About the Project


    Umm el-Jimal, Jordan

    Umm el-Jimal, continuously occupied from the 1st through 9th centuries AD, contains an early Roman-era village and adjacent Byzantine and early Islamic period towns. The site includes a wealth of inscriptions in Nabatean, Greek, Latin, and Arabic and is an exceptional example of a prosperous agricultural town on the frontier of the Roman, Byzantine, and Islamic empires. Umm el-Jimal is currently threatened by neglect, looting, a lack of shared ownership, and very few economic opportunities for residents.

The double‐arch window at House XVIII, a major domestic complex Interior of the so‐called ‘Barracks,’ likely a small Roman/Byzantine cavalry fort that was later converted to a monastery. AIA/Open Hand Studios and Umm el-Jimal Project Pottery and other artifacts from Umm el-Jimal Excavation of skeletal remains at Umm el-Jimal Mosaic floor remains from a Byzantine cathedral at the site Ancient mangers inside House 119, now restored to function as Umm el-Jimal's site museum One of many stone inscriptions found at the site

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