Wilhelmina and Stanley Jashemski Lecture

The Archaeological Institute of America has established an annual lecture in honor of Wilhelmina and Stanley Jashemski.

Wilhelmina Jashemski was educated at York College, the University of Nebraska, and the University of Chicago. She began her teaching career in 1935 and was a faculty member at the University of Maryland from 1946–1980.

In 1961, Professor Jashemski was invited to commence excavations at Pompeii. For the next twenty-two years, she directed the University of Maryland’s archaeological investigation of Pompeii, Boscoreale, and Oplontis. She has also excavated gardens in Hadrian’s villa at Tivoli. As a result of her pioneering work, Professor Jashemski is credited with creating a new field of archaeology: the investigation of ancient gardens.

Throughout her professional career, Dr. Jashemski enjoyed the support and companionship of her husband, Stanley. A noted physicist, Mr. Jashemski accompanied his wife during her archaeological fieldwork and partnered with her in bringing innovative scientific methodologies to archaeological excavation. Furthermore, he contributed photography and drawings of the sites to illustrate her monumental two-volume work, The Gardens of Pompeii, Herculaneum, and the Villas Destroyed by Vesuvius (1979, 1993), and other publications.

The Archaeological Institute of America awarded its highest honor, the Gold Medal for Distinguished Archaeological Achievement, to Wilhelmina Jashemski in 1996.

The Wilhelmina and Stanley Jashemski Lecture was generously endowed by an anonymous donor. The Jashemski Lecture will be given annually on an archaeological topic, with a specific focus on ancient Roman gardens.

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