New Grants from the AIA
February 17, 2017

The Archaeological Institute of America is pleased to announce the availability of three new grants for archaeological research.

  1. The Richard C. MacDonald Iliad Endowment for Archaeological Research will provide support to scholars working on the site of Ancient Troy, or those geographic areas/time periods that give context to current understanding of Ancient Troy. The grant will support the study of ancient cultures and civilizations that interacted with the Trojans over the city’s long history, including examining the regional setting of Troy. The grant amount for 2017-18 is $20,000. 
  2. The Julie Herzig Desnick Endowment Fund for Archaeological Field Surveys provides grants to archaeologists for new archaeological survey projects. The awards are intended for projects involving field survey on the ground or a combination of field survey and remote sensing methods, rather than those based entirely on satellite imagery or other remote sensing data. Geophysical survey projects are also eligible. While all are encouraged to apply, preference will be given to archaeologists at an early stage in their careers (within 8 years of the receipt of the PhD). Projects may concern any location in the world and any time period. Each project should make innovative use of technology, and the fieldwork proposed should be designed to address important questions about the human past. In 2017, the Herzig Desnick Fund will be combined with the AIA Fieldwork Fund, for a total award of up to 5,500 USD.
  3. The Ellen and Charles Steinmetz Endowment Fund for Archaeology supports the use of technology in archaeological research by providing grants to archaeological projects that make innovative use of technological tools and methods. Normally, such projects will have a fieldwork element. However, research conducted in a laboratory setting that employs technology may also be eligible for a grant. While all are encouraged to apply, priority will be given to new projects proposed by archaeologists at an early stage in their careers (within 8 years of the receipt of the PhD). Projects may concern any location in the world and any time period, but must be designed to address important questions about the human past specifically through technological means. “Technology” should be understood broadly to include not only digital tools and approaches, but also those developed in engineering, chemistry, biology, physics, etc. In 2017, the Steinmetz Fund will provide a total award of up to 5,500 USD.

For more information about these programs and to apply, visit www.archaeological.org/grants. All applications are due to Ben Thomas (bthomas@aia.bu.edu) by March 1st, 2017.