The Vitor Archaeological Project
The Vitor Archaeological Project
The Vitor Archaeological ProjectThe Vitor Archaeological Project
The Vitor Archaeological ProjectThe Vitor Archaeological Project

Location: Peru

Season Dates: June 22, 2014 - July 26, 2014
Session Dates: Single session
Application Deadline: June 7, 2014

Website: http://www.ifrglobal.org/programs/south-america/peru-vitor

Program Type
Field school

Affiliation: University of Chicago, UCLA, Centro de Investigaciones Arqueológicas Arequipa, & the Institute for Field Research

Project Director: Dr. María Cecilia Lozada, University of Chicago; Dr. Hans Barnard, Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA; Lic. Augusto Cardona Rosas, Centro de Investigaciones Arqueológicas Arequipa; and Ms. Dawn Lohnas, Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Objects Conservation at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Project Description

The Vitor Archaeological Project is a comprehensive, longitudinal study of the lower Vitor Valley, approximately 40 kilometers west of the modern city of Arequipa. This is a multi-disciplinary project with strong field, laboratory, and bioarchaeological components. The project is focused primarily on the Early Intermediate and Middle Horizon occupation periods of the valley, with a strong emphasis on the Millo site complex. We have already identified extensive Wari influence and possible presence at Vitor, including a D-shaped temple and significant quantities of Wari-influenced ceramics.  In 2014, students will begin new excavations at the D-shaped temple. Students will also have the opportunity to participate in the mortuary excavations of a local tradition known as Ramadas.  Significant time will be dedicated to laboratory analysis of materials excavated from the temple and cemetery and for their conservation.

Period(s) of Occupation: Middle Horizon and Late Intermediate Periods

Project Size: 1-24 participants

Minimum Length of Stay for Volunteers: Full program length

Minimum Age: 18 years old

Experience Required: No previous experience is required

Room and Board Arrangements

Students will live in comfortable but modest field housing in the Vitor Valley and in Hotel La Casa de mi Abuela (www.lacasademiabuela.com) when in Arequipa.  While at the field house in the Vitor Valley, all participants will be expected to help keep the living spaces orderly and assist with daily tasks, which may include the preparation of meals and other activities necessary for a successful field program.
All meals will be communal events and will provide plenty of nutritious but basic food in the tradition of local cuisine. The daily diet in Peru is heavily based on rice, corn, potatoes and meat.  Specialized diets (vegan, kosher, etc.) are impossible to maintain in this location. Vegetarians may attend but will find options limited.  

Cost: All room and board costs are included in tuition (excluding weekend meals)

Academic Credit
Name of institution offering credit: Connecticut College
Number of credits offered: 8 semester credit units (equivalent to 12 quarter units)
Tuition: $5,050

Contact Information
Institute for Field Research
1855 Industrial St. #106
Los Angeles, CA 90021
info@ifrglobal.org
Phone: 424 226-6130

Recommended Bibliography

Cardona, R. Augusto, and Ran Boytner. 2010. "Más Allá de la Frontera: Nuevas Evidencias de Interacción Tiwanaky y Wari en el  Valle de Vitor. Arequipa." Paper presented at the SAA 75th Annual Meeting, St. Louis.

Cardona, R. Augusto, María Cecilia Lozada, and Hans Barnard. 2012. "The Vitor Valley: A New Window to the Prehistory of the South Central Andes." Paper presented at the 40th Annual Midwest Conference on Andean and Amazonian Archaeology and Ethnohistory at the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago.

Haeberli, Joerg. 2006. "When and Where Did the Nasca Proliferous Style Emerge?" In Andean Archaeology III: North and South. William H. Isbell and Helaine Silverman, eds. Pp. 401-434. New York: Springer.

Isbell, H. William. 2010. Agency, Identity and Control: Understanding Wari Space and Power. In Beyond Wari Walls. Regional Perspectives on Middle Horizon Peru. Justin Jennings, ed. Pp. 233-254. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press.

Isla, Johnny and Markus Reindel. 2006. "Burial Patterns and Sociopolitical Organization in Nasca 5 Society." In Andean Archaeology III: North and South. William H. Isbell and Helaine Silverman, ed. 374-399. New York: Springer.

Lozada, María Cecilia. 2010. "Mortuary Landscapes in the Vitor Valley of Southern Perú." Paper presented at the SAA 75th Annual Meeting,  in St. Louis., MO.

Nigra, Benjamin T., Hans Barnard and Rodolfo Talavera. 2010. "Structural Patterning at Millo II in the Southern Huari Periphery." Paper presented at the SAA 75th Annual Meeting, St. Louis.

Nigra, Benjamin T., and Augusto Cardona. 2012. "Directing Traffic: A Survey of Space and Movement in Middle Horizon Vitor Peru." Poster presented at the 40th Annual Midwest Conference on Andean and Amazonian Archaeology and Ethnohistory at the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago.

Shimada, Izumi and Rafael Vega-Centeno. 2011. "Peruvian Archaeology: Its Growth, Characteristics, Practice and Challenge." In Comparative Archaeologies: A Sociological View of the Science of the Past. Lazuis, Ludomir R. Lazius, ed. Pp. 569-612. New York: Springer.

Schreiber, Katharina. 2001. "The Wari Empire of Middle Horizon Peru: The Epistemological  Challenge of Documenting an Empire Without Documentary Evidence." In Empires: Perspectives from Archaeology and History. Susan E. Alcock, Terence N. D’Altroy, Kathleen D. Morrison, and Carla M. Sinopoli, eds. Pp. 70-92. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

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