Roman Capital of the Dacian Provinces Excavation - First Roman City North of the Danube (Transylvania, Romania)
Amphitheater
Sarmizegetusa Ulpia TraianaForum
InscriptionExcavation

Location: Sarmizegetusa, Hunedoara, Romania

Season Dates: July 5, 2015 - August 8, 2015
Application Deadline: April 25, 2015

Website: http://www.archaeotek.org/roman_capital_of_the_dacian_provinces_excavation

Flyer:

Program Type
Field school
Volunteer

Affiliation: National Museum of History of Transylvania (Cluj Napoca, Transylvania, Romania) and Archaeological Techniques and Research Center (Canada)

Project Director: Dr. Alvaro Ibarra, College of Charleston; Dr. Carmen Ciongradi, National Museum of History of Transylvania, Cluj Napoca, Transylvania, Romania

Project Description

In the plains at the foot of the majestic Retezat Mountains in Southern Transylvania, rose the first Roman metropolis north on the Danube:  Colonia Ulpia Traiana Augusta Dacica Sarmizegea. Located less than 50km from the former capital of the mighty Dacians finally defeated in 106 by Trajan’s legions, it was built on a strategic point where a battle between the Roman legions and the Dacian troops took place. Sarmizegetusa Ulpia Traiana quickly became the largest city in Roman Dacia and the capital of the Dacian Provinces. With an area of over 30ha, it was a very imposing cosmopolitan center, featuring four Palmyrene temples (among many others), a large forum with associated buildings, an amphitheater, gladiator schools, imposing fortifications and several necropoles.

This extraordinary city produced a plethora of beautiful monuments, quarried for 15 centuries both for artistic value and high quality limestone and marble. Medieval churches, such as the early medieval church of Densus, and castles display fragments from Roman Sarmizegetusa bas-reliefs and statues. The forum itself has been quarried for lime for at least one century, when the local stopped building with brick and started using cement.

The systematic excavation of the site has started in 1924 under the direction of Prof. C. Daicoviciu and continued until 1936. In 1973, the excavations have resumed under the expert leadership of Profs. H. Daicoviciu, D. Alicu and I. Piso. At the present time, less than 15% of the site has been exposed, revealing a cosmopolitan and rich metropolis. Our excavation will continue the exploration of the Forum and associated temples as well as identifying domestic living structures outside the public plazzas. We will also survey the city necropolises and possibly start work on a funeral household enclosure.

Period(s) of Occupation: Roman (Imperial, Provincial), Late Iron Age

Project Size: 1-24 participants

Minimum Length of Stay for Volunteers: 5 weeks

Minimum Age: 18

Experience Required: Training in excavation, survey and processing provided. Various lectures will be offered throughout the program.

Room and Board Arrangements

Students and volunteers will be housed in a beautifully restored rural pension, in the village of Sarmizegetusa, Hunedoara County, at the foot of the majestic Retezat Mountains. Participants will be housed 2-4 occupancy rooms, with semi-private bathrooms with hot showers. Breakfast, lunch and dinner will be provided, during workdays (Mon-Fri). The pension is situated about 25min walk from the site.

Cost: $1585

Academic Credit
Name of institution offering credit: Archaeological Techniques and Research Center
Number of credits offered: none

Contact Information
Dr. Alvaro Ibarra
92 Fishburne St.
Charleston, SC 29403-4778
USA
archaeology@archaeotek.org

Recommended Bibliography

Alicu, D.  & Adela Paki, 1995. Town Planning and Population in Ulpia Traiana Sarmizegetusa. BAR IS 605, Oxford.

Ciugudean, D., 2001. Workshops and manufacturing techniques at Apulum (2nd and 3rd century AD). British International Series, 937:61-72.

De Sena, E.C., and H. Dobrzanska (eds.), 2011. The Roman Empire and beyond : archaeological and historical research on the Romans and native cultures in Central Europe. Oxford: Archaeopress.

Diaconescu, A., 2004. The towns of Roman Dacia: an overview of recent archaeological research. In W.S. Hanson and I.P. Haynes (eds.), 2004. Roman Dacia: the Making of a Provincial Society. Portsmouth: Journal of Roman Archaeology, Supplementary Series, 56.

Haynes, I.P., and W.S. Hanson, 2004. An introduction to Roman Dacia. In W.S. Hanson and I.P. Haynes (eds.), 2004. Roman Dacia: the Making of a Provincial Society. Portsmouth: Journal of Roman Archaeology, Supplementary Series, 56.

Hanson, W.S. and I.P. Haynes (eds.), 2004. Roman Dacia: the Making of a Provincial Society. Portsmouth: Journal of Roman Archaeology, Supplementary Series, 56.

Lockyear, K., 2004. The Late Iron Age background to Roman Dacia. In W.S. Hanson and I.P. Haynes (eds.), 2004. Roman Dacia: the Making of a Provincial Society. Portsmouth: Journal of Roman Archaeology, Supplementary Series, 56.

Macrea, Mihai, 1969. Life in Roman Dacia. Bucharest.

Oltean, Ioana A., 2007. Dacia. Landscape, Colonisation, Romanisation. Routledge, London.

Oltean, I.A,, 2004. Rural settlement in Roman Dacia: some considerations. In W.S. Hanson and I.P. Haynes (eds.), 2004. Roman Dacia: the Making of a Provincial Society. Portsmouth: Journal of Roman Archaeology, Supplementary Series, 56.

Oltean, I.A. & W.S. Hanson, 2007. Villa settlement in Roman Transylvania. Journal of Roman Archaeology 20:113-137.

Opreanu, C.H., 2009. Chronology and cultural identity of the interaction zones over the frontiers of Roman Dacia. In O., Tentea, and I.C. Opris (eds.), Near and Beyond the Roman Frontiers. Bucharest: Center for Roman Military Studies, 5, pp. 129-150.

Opreanu, C.H., 2009. Chronology and cultural identity of the interaction zones over the frontiers of Roman Dacia. In O., Tentea, and I.C. Opris (eds.), Near and Beyond the Roman Frontiers. Bucharest: Center for Roman Military Studies, 5, pp. 129-150.

Ruscu, D. 2004. The supposed extermination of the Dacians: the literary tradition. In W.S. Hanson and I.P. Haynes (eds.), 2004. Roman Dacia: the Making of a Provincial Society. Portsmouth: Journal of Roman Archaeology, Supplementary Series, 56.

Tentea, O., and I.C. Opris (eds.), 2009. Near and Beyond the Roman Frontiers. Bucharest: Center for Roman Military Studies, 5.

Webster, J., 2001. Creolizing the Roman Provinces. American Journal of Archaeology, 105:209-225.

Weiss, D., 2011. Influence and observation: towards a more concrete understanding of the Roman-Dacian limes. In E.C. De Sena, and H. Dobrzanska (eds.), The Roman Empire and beyond : archaeological and historical research on the Romans and native cultures in Central Europe. Oxford: Archaeopress.

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